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This happens when a page includes a hreflang link to an alternate language, but the linked page doesn't link back to it. This Official Google Webmaster Central Blog post explains that: Annotations must be confirmed from the pages they are pointing to. If page A links to page B, page B must link back to page A, otherwise the annotations may not be ...


20

If you canonicalise appropriately, it is fine. Use rel="canonical" to specify that the pages are identical, and hreflang for the alternate languages. <link rel="canonical" href="https://example.org/es/ads/2"> <link rel="alternate" hreflang="en" href="https://example.org/en/ads/2"> <link rel="alternate" hreflang="es" href="https://example.org/...


6

Splash screens are acceptable according to Google. They do offer some best practices however, when using multi-language/multi-regional sites. In this article, Google recommends the use of the hreflang tag within <link rel="alternate" ... /> tag in the head. The specific excerpt from the article is below: For language/country selectors or ...


6

They should be identical as far as SEO is concerned, because Google doesn't look in the URL to determine language - to determine language they actually use machine learning on the text content itself. The important part for SEO is to just make Google aware of the different language versions of each page by using meta tags like so: <head> <title&...


5

Whereas the answer by Andrew makes sense and is in line with the official response by Google, I see 3 types of errors in my website: A URL containing an URL-encoded URL is linked back using the properly encoded URL. E.g. http://example.com%3Flang%3Dzh is linked back as http://example.com?lang=zh - there is not much I can do if someone is linking my site ...


5

Ok. Found the answer at: Help Google serve the correct language to your visitors We need to have a url tag for each of the url and specify the others as alternate urls.


4

As Stephen said, it is mostly likely an attempt at defining locale. In some of the web-based software that I've worked with, I've come across form values and URLs like: <input type="hidden" name="lc" value="US"> Or page.php?id=233&lc=FRA The meta tag for "lc" is undocumented, which means that it is either a mistake or some sort of custom tag ...


4

Within another context I have given these examples of how to use hreflang and canonical links. For your purpose I added structural data in the head section of both examples with meta tags indicating an organization name, brand and department: Example of an English webpage http://example.com/en/ <!DOCTYPE html> <html lang="en"> <head ...


4

We checked today on November 29th and the title in the SERP no longer has the - Foobar USA appended to the end. It is now just Foobar Korea (not Foobar Korea - Foobar USA). Here is what we did October 27th (Day 0) - Added the following structured data: <script type="application/ld+json"> { "@context": "http://schema.org", "@type": "Organization", "...


4

In short, no. The "Supported language/region codes" section of Google's hreflang guidelines is fairly unambiguous: The value of the hreflang attribute identifies the language (in ISO 639-1 format) and optionally the region (in ISO 3166-1 Alpha 2 format) of an alternate URL. The use of the word "region" there is perhaps confusing. ISO 3166-1 Alpha 2 codes ...


3

It is not valid. ea.com is using HTML5, but in HTML5 it is only allowed to use name values that are defined in the specification, or registered on the WHATWG wiki page MetaExtensions. lc is not included. If they were using older HTML versions (e.g., HTML 4.01), it would be valid to use this value.


3

also geotarget the subfolder to the main territory he would wish to target for that langauge? You can specify the region (as well as the language) in the hreflang attribute. However, whether you should or not is really dependent on your subject matter. You say that these other languages are simply translations of the English version, so I would guess not. ...


3

Using a combination of localised sites (de.example.com or www.example.com/de/), with a global default landing page at www.example.com in conjunction with conditional redirects based on Accept-Language value is a common and perfectly search engine friendly approach, if properly optimised. Optimise the regional variants by applying lang attribute for those ...


3

I think that what you'll want to do is change the way your system works. If no language is specified in the URL, but you detect the language via the browser settings, then your site should redirect the user to a URL with that language in the path. This is for two reason: 1) Duplicate content. Spiders/Bots will come to test.com/books, test.com/booken, and ...


3

Edit based on Joao's comment* The domains in question are cctld, i.e .es, .it, .pt. Geotargeted subfolders on country specific domains don't work well, if the top level domain is generic (i.e. .com) this solution works. Otherwise, from a pure "best for ranking" perspective, keeping cctlds that only serve one country is best, but, like every solution, each ...


3

We would set up an hreflang="en" or hreflang="x-default" for the primary site, and an hreflang=en-uk just for the UK site Couple of corrections here. For the global English content hreflang="en" would be correct, not hreflang="x-default". The latter is reserved for language selectors and conditionally redirecting pages, per Google's hreflang ...


3

If the specified font doesn’t contain a glyph for a character, browsers typically use a fallback font to render this character. (Browsers don’t have do this, of course, and how it exactly works might also depend on the operating system. But it would be really suprising if there were browsers that don’t use fallback fonts. Not to mention that there are many ...


3

I think the proper heading looks something like this: <link rel="alternate" href="http://example.com" hreflang="en-us" /> <link rel="alternate" href="http://example.co.uk" hreflang="en-gb" /> https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/189077?hl=en (same link as provided by emirodgar)


3

From an SEO perspective, it doesn't matter. However, in the general case, using query-based language configuration complicates server code all over the place. It makes handling forms slightly more complicated, can complicate template processing, removes the possibility of static language-based files (e.g. imagine a banner image in each language, you can't ...


3

Search engines love multiple-languages and are super flexible Google and Bing are very flexible when it comes to structuring a website with multiple languages. The first thing you should know about these types of sites is that you can either target a language or a language + country. Country Based Content Targetting a country is more ideal for sites that ...


3

Google determines language by running your page through a machine learning algo, they don't use tags: Google uses the visible content of your page to determine its language. We don’t use any code-level language information such as lang attributes, or the URL. You can help Google determine the language correctly by using a single language for content and ...


3

A .gr domain will only ever rank on Google for searchers from Greece. There is no way to target a .gr domain to worldwide users of Google. See I'm using a vanity country code top level domain (ccTLD), can I persuade Google to geotarget a different region?. It doesn't make sense to put your English content on a .gr domain name unless it is focused just for ...


3

Google Guide Managing multi-regional and multilingual sites tells us: Use different URLs for different language versions Google recommends using different URLs for each language version of a page... This means that your versions for English and German content must have separate URLs. Another Google guide Follow the structured data guidelines tells us the ...


3

Your indexing is going to be spotty. Google may index some of both sites. It will index mostly your international site because Google does most of its crawling from the US. Auto-redirection based on geo-IP address or the Accept-Language header hurts SEO. If you want good SEO, you can't use redirects. Google crawls from all over the world. It expects to ...


3

Either way can work fine for SEO. There is going to be no difference in crawl rate. Targeting can be done either way with hreflang. I have a site with great SEO with English at the root of the domain but subdomains for every other language. Wikipedia (which also has great SEO) uses a language subdomain for every language including English. Advantages ...


3

I have a contrary opinion on this. I don't believe your checkbox collects any additional consent from the user that just submitting the form does, so I believe the checkbox can be removed because it is useless. Let's break down the consent language: I consent to having this website store my submitted information so they can respond to my query. Firstly: I ...


3

Regardless of redirects (Saw your comment), if you don't set hreflang annotations and canonicalize pages Google will likely consider them duplicates. Via document <head> <head> <title>Example.com</title> <link rel="alternate" hreflang="en-gb" href="http://en-gb.example.com/page.html" /> <...


2

Here is my suggestion: You can find out the best language to show to user using the user agent along with user IP, if there is no user preference record. If you want to show up for searches in all languages, don't use java script for translation at all. You can redirect users to the appropriate domain (e.g. de.example.com) which has the localized text in ...


2

Your redirection rule and dropdown menu are not ideal from an SEO standpoint. Google won't be able to crawl and index your content properly unless you have different URLs for each language. See: How should I structure my URLs for both SEO and localization? From an SEO standpoint, you shouldn't choose the language based on a URL parameter, the user's ...


2

Very few sites get this right, the complex permutations are very confusing. It appears that you may have two different issues here: 1st Example (Careers): You are indicating, using the rel=alternate reference, that there are other versions of that URL, when there is only one. You only need to self-reference when there are other alternates. This circular ...


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