31

Google's Duplicate Content webmaster guide defines duplicate content (for purposes of search engine optimization) as "substantive blocks of content within or across domains that either completely match other content or are appreciably similar". Google's guide goes on to list the following as examples of duplicate content: Discussion forums that can ...


20

It is critical! If it's not unique in some way you become another of the useless, pointless, needless web sites that are among the millions thinking they can make money repeating what others do but, instead, should be thrown on a dung heap and make me think the internet needs to be regulated to prevent such sites from existing.


20

Let's be upfront about this. This is blackhat. The very concept you are pursuing is what I call "city-state spamming". That is, creating "content" (to use the term loosely) for every possible of something -- localities, postal codes, area codes/prefixes, ports, iPhone apps, you name it. You have no interest in generating bona-fide original content for ...


12

Yes, if you have your URLs redirected properly. Yes. You should be using a 301 redirect instead of internally rewriting the URLs. No, this is completely unnecessary. If your old URLs are 301 redirected to the new URLs, then Google will know that those resources have been permanently renamed/moved. That's the whole point of having a 301 redirect code (as ...


11

If you don't specifically tell Google your preference you will probably have duplicate content issues. There is more then one way to inform Google of your preferred domain: Do a 301 redirect to use the 'www' or no 'www' Specify your preferred domain in Google Webmaster Tools Use canonical URLs (although it isn't typically used in this situation)


11

Search engines index pages by URL, and duplicate content is content that's found at more than one URL - see this for more: What is Duplicate Content? Search engines would only penalize content appearing more than once on the same page if it appears to be spammy or an attempt at keyword stuffing. Incorporating different menus and layout structures would not ...


11

You need original content for each page of your site. Even 300 words sounds a light to describe places in the world. There are entire guidebooks written about different places in the world. Furthermore, your original content can't be re-used, warmed-over, or spun. Google considers machine generated content to be very low quality. Using machine ...


9

Yes, Google still crawl webpages that have noindex tag. But if you have same content on two different webpages and one URL contain noindex tag, while second does not, then you should not worry about it, because out of all duplicate content only one webpage is indexed by Google. Rest of webpages are crawlable but not indexed in Google search result, so that ...


8

While its not bad advice from the SEO company I do feel its a little incomplete, there's a tag that you can use on your pages to avoid duplicates finding their way into the index of search engines such as Google. Better Advice The better advice from the SEO company would be to ensure that your using Rel Canonical on your pages so no pages ever end up in ...


8

Content Scraping is not at all Good and it is a worst SEO technique (Negative SEO) which will surely harm your website in Panda update. Google will penalize those websites which are following content scraping technique. In Google support page you can find Scraped content Some webmasters use content taken (“scraped”) from other, more reputable ...


7

About a year ago Google tackled this problem by creating Source Attribution meta tags: syndication-source: this meta tag is used to point to the long-lived (bookmarkable) URL of the original article. This should be used on all pages that republish the syndicated content, but it can also be used on the original page to point to itself as the syndication ...


7

It's very simple how it works: Google sees 2 or more sites with the same content. It's not gonna show you all of them, because it's not really a good resultpage if everything is the same. So it starts to decide which of the sites will be shown. It does this based on a few factors like: - Which site had it first (on same publish date, this is THE FIRST ...


7

Google's bots will still want to request /robots.txt from your sub domain and not /robots_static.txt which would have no meaning to them. RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} ^www\.static\..*$ [NC] RewriteRule ^/robots\.txt$ /robots_static.txt [L] When requests for /robots.txt are made from your www.static domain the /robots_static.txt file will be served up as if it ...


7

I deal with this type of situation using my virtual host configuration. Under Apache, the first virtual host is the "default" virtual host. I configure it to serve a 404 error with the message 404 Not Found -- Hostname Not Recognized This server is not configured to serve documents for foo.example.com Then I create specific virtual hosts for each ...


7

Ideally, no. It is very, very difficult to get penalised (Sandboxing, Deindexing). Having duplicate content may 'de-value' your content and it will have less weight than it would organically but it's Google's job to identify the original content whilst devalueing other pages. Setting a canonical link on your website is your way of telling search engines ...


7

GWT is known for not refreshing some parts of their data very often. Chances are your site got crawled before the 301's and what was reported at that time got stuck. Usually it will go away after a while but in some cases it will stay the same. I have about 40 error that haven't changed in over a year. All have 301's set on them.


7

Okay. This will be one of those cases where I will work through the process so that it becomes clearer. It will be somewhat long, but hopefully not painfully long. Let's start at the beginning shall we? Starting with what we know about how Google works based originally with the research paper by Brin and Page back in 1997, we know a few things things that ...


7

As Goyllo has already stated, search engine bots will crawl pages that have a noindex meta tag. If you think about it, they need to crawl the page in order to see the noindex meta tag in the first place. (You could use an X-Robots-Tag HTTP response header instead and, in theory, a bot would only need to do a HEAD request in order to see the noindex attribute ...


6

Unfortunately, having the same content on a mobile page would be considered a duplicate. This is among the few legitimate sources of inevitable content duplication, along with syndicated content and news/blog homepages. But if you just have a single URL for each page and simply switching the CSS based on cookies, then there's really only one page. This is ...


6

Canonical URLs are per page, not per website. So if you are using a canonical URL it must point to the page it is a duplicate of, not the website that page resides on. And actually you both are wrong. You don't use canonical URLs for this. You are supposed to use a 301 redirect to indicate that a page has moved to a new URL. Canonical URLs are to indicate ...


6

Personally I would do the opposite canonical - ie set /texas/houston as canon instead of /houston - the main reason being to avoid name clashes with identical names in other states. A URL of /springfield could be a little confusing, even if you are showing a specific Springfield page. You also get an extra keyword in the URL. Secondly, I would always prefer ...


6

No there is not, Google will reflect the changes when it crawls and processes your pages again. This whole process may take from days to weeks and you can't force Google to do it right away. Even if those conflicts are already solved, they could still be showing up in Webmaster Tools.


6

You can remove the sub-domains in webmaster tools, but first you need to add the sub domains as seperate sites and then submit a site removal. They should be gone within a day or so. See these instructions for removing a site from google : https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/1663427?hl=en


6

Let me give you practical answer. If yours is heavy backlink profile from high worth sites then chances of Panda penalty will be much less than if you hadn't. Secondly if you're copying articles "as is" then it is adding to internet spam. Everyone wastes time and energy on such sites. Google abhors such sites. These ways you can help reduce web spam: So ...


6

No don't use a 302, because it means temporary redirection. Set a canonical link in page 1 to index.html. That is the right way. REM: both pages exist, but Google (and other search engines) will only pick one to display in search results.


6

Personally, I would use canonical URLs. Example: <link rel="canonical" href="http://othersite.com/article-name" /> Avoids any duplicate content issues and allows you to re-publish articles on your newer website. This approach is often used by blogging networks such as Gawker, etc.


6

Two of the most widely used operating system file systems for serving web content have have very different settings for case sensitivity of URLs by default. Whether or not your URLs are case sensitive is likely a function of which you are using: Microsoft IIS running on Windows - case insensitive URLs - shows the same content regardless of capitalization. ...


6

It's not normal that your site is outranking you, but can happen. Google has its own tool to report Scrapped content, you can check it here -> https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1Pw1KVOVRyr4a7ezj_6SHghnX1Y6bp1SOVmy60QjkF0Y/viewform I also advise you to make a DMCA complaint, as addresses copyright issues and can act faster. I had that experience in the past ...


6

The idea to make a site mobile friendly is excellent, but I don't think your method is best, especially if later you decide to monetize your website with adsense for these reasons: You're scripting your site so that text is hidden if a screen resolution is under a specific value. Google may think you're playing games when you use this technique and might ...


6

When using content from other sites you can use <blockquote> and <cite>, one of my customers had a similar case to yours, they wanted to use external reviews on TrustPilot, by using blockquote, cite and Schema they have not experience any droppings in rankings. You can view the code in action by visiting their site and viewing the source on any ...


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