8

I'm not aware of anything explicit from Google that specifically advises translating URLs to local language, however they have acknowledged that keywords in URLs do help. You can see that Google (and Bing) is doing something with URL keywords by the way they're bolded in search results. That being established, it's a reasonable extension to say that ...


7

...is it considered to be duplicate content if the site is in another language which happens to be an exact duplicate? Google doesn't consider the same content translated into different languages as duplicate content since the same content in English that's translated into French is different, unlike the same content appearing twice in English, as ...


5

One thing to note is that when Google suggests, "This page is in XYZ" and offers translation, it doesn't necessarily mean it thinks the entire page is in that language. Even if it thinks that just a very small part of the page is in that language it offers the same option to translate the page. In your example, if you click on the translate link, ...


5

It makes no difference, how you translate your content. Main keywords are always: proofreading and curation. If these procedures give you the go - then everything is OK. Google translate or Bing or Promt or a million other translation services - really no difference. They all do their job - more or less good, depending on complexity of the content and ...


4

It is against Google's webmaster guidelines to put machine translated text where Googlebot can find it and index it. Google will penalize your site for auto-generated content for doing so. Here is the excerpt from the guidelines: Q: Can I use automated translations? A: Yes, but they must be blocked from indexing with the “noindex” robots meta tag. We ...


4

No, Google does not view translated content as duplicate, as content in another language is different than if it is appearing in the same language twice.However, it is recommended to have a human translation as Googlebots can tell if the site has been translated using Google Translate and may view it as 'spammy'.


3

The URLs should be in the same language as the content. Ideally you would also translate the relevant path segments (like "product" in your example), not only the slug. A URL that’s in a language users might not understand is useless for them. A good URL is descriptive, it gives an idea what the content is about. If it’s in a language the users don’t ...


3

Try this in the <head> section: <meta charset="UTF-8"> <meta name="google" content="notranslate"> <meta http-equiv="Content-Language" content="en">


3

Google determines language by running your page through a machine learning algo, they don't use tags: Google uses the visible content of your page to determine its language. We don’t use any code-level language information such as lang attributes, or the URL. You can help Google determine the language correctly by using a single language for content and ...


2

The Google Translate Toolbar only appears to send analytics events for the old (non-universal) analytics. I developed the following workaround. Just: Ensure you set gaTrack: true and gaId: 'xxx' in your translation toolbar settings Include the below script on your page alongside the translate snippet /*! * Capture Analytics for Google Translate * As of ...


2

You should definitely have a different URL for each language for SEO. In your pages you can use Links in the header to inform the bot or useragent of the other languages: <link rel="Alternate" hreflang="en-US" title="English content" href="/english/page.htm" /> <link rel="Alternate" hreflang="nl-NL" title="Dutch translation" href="/dutch/page.htm" ...


2

No, you should leave the original site untouched, as by this time the Search Engines already have it well indexed and you don't want to confuse them with another site with the same content, just different url. Besides, the Search Engines already know your site is French, even if you don't have a .fr domain. Inside Webmaster Tools, for example you can select ...


2

As noted by Waldir: You should specify the link and the link label as system messages and create language code subpages of said messages for them to follow user interface language. See the manual for more. For instance * portal-url|portal with [[MediaWiki:Portal]] being "Portale" and [[MediaWiki:Portal/en]] "Portal" (on an Italian wiki). You can also use ...


2

You say you have checked Google's multilingual guidelines pages, but have you implemented the rel="alternate" hreflang= mark up, either on the pages source code or in sitemaps? If not you should do that, as it can help Google discover and understand the connection between your translated pages. If you haven't already, make sure all your URLs are in a ...


2

The purpose of hreflang is to help Google with geotargeting your website, especially if you are having all your language versions in different subfolders on a gTLD domain (like .com, .net, .org etc.). So its main purpose is to serve the correct version of your website to the user, depending on their language and region. It can also help prevent from ...


2

Multi-regional and multilingual sites A multilingual website is any website that offers content in more than one language. Examples of multilingual websites might include a Canadian business with an English and a French version of its site, or a blog on Latin American soccer available in both Spanish and Portuguese. A multi-regional website is one that ...


2

Is that possible to rename the greek files to something like the following example: www.example.com/blog-gr.html/ should be renamed to www.example.com/blog.html/gr eg: Remove the -gr of all the greek documents and add /gr at the end. Also only for index file, example.com/index-gr.html should be example.com/gr Theres a couple ways you ...


2

Google will reward each version of the page on its own merits, in fact, it's common if not expected that some languages have fewer words or more words than one compared to another. This also means more or less headers, again, each version is treated separately. As long as you DO NOT use auto-translate software then you will be okay.


1

Marking it up in sitemap: https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/2620865?hl=en Meta tags: https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/189077?hl=en The problem is with navbar and if you use some kind of automation to "related pages", social media and all the other stuff. If it is just for a few static ones the sitemap and meta tags are ...


1

Back when Google still had the free Translate API there where terms which would have made this against the rules as the terms stated that it was for the purpose of translating source content to an alternate language for end users to be able to read or for translating user content from their source language to the site language. Since the depreciation of the ...


1

Disavowing was the first suggestion I had. I would file a complaint with Google. Once the claim is processes they will de-index the page or hit them with a manual action that will knock them from the SERP (though neither are guaranteed). https://www.google.com/webmasters/tools/dmca-notice?pli=1&


1

Because this is only for search engines and communicating where to find your site - you could move all of this code over to your Sitemap and submit it in the search engine of your choice's Webmaster interface. Advantages: Make it as big as you like, without bloating your HTML. There's no limit! No need to worry about confusing header link structures. You ...


1

Use x-default for the default version of your website that you haven't targeted yet by another hreflang. For your information, Google don't mention canonical. reference: https://googlewebmastercentral.blogspot.fr/2013/04/x-default-hreflang-for-international-pages.html From your code you have added to your question i can see a misconfiguration <link ...


1

For HTML5: A link with the alternate link type indicates that the linked document is an alternate representation of the linking document. A link with the hreflang attribute indicates the language of the linked document. A link with alternate + hreflang indicates that the linked document is a translation of the linking document (see my answer with a quote ...


1

To keep your current rankings don't move the current content. For new content create subfolder. Assume your site looks now like: example.com/page-one, /page-two etc. Assume it is in english. Then, if you want to translate your content into German, create a subfolder /de/ and double your site structure into it, like /de/page-one, /de/page-two. Your ...


1

hreflang may be used on any link. It doesn’t matter from which and to which document you link. It just conveys in which language the linked document is.¹ hreflang+alternate may be used only on links which point to a translation for the linking document.² ¹ In practice I’d only specify the hreflang attribute if the language of the linked document is ...


1

There is a video at Google Webmasters Youtube channel that presents a slide with a closed list of what is considered by Google as a duplicate content: What's duplicate content? Exact same page, or same content (or piece of content) www / non-www / http / https / index.html / ?utm=... Separate mobile-friendly URLs, printer-friendly URLs, CDN hosts Tag pages,...


1

In both cases, adding content to your site (whether original or a translation) does not per se improve SEO. What you need are inbound links. If those posts get you inbound links, then they will improve SEO. If they don't, other than possibly adding a few matches for non-competitive requests, they won't do much for you.


1

Why creating pages for each language is pointless? That is the only way of doing it, you can put your keywords to same page in every language, but that looks bad and you might get penalized by Google too. Istockphoto for an example has separate pages for different languages too. To be more precise they have them under different subdomains.


1

Yes, The problem of not much traffic from China and Japan is mainly because of the language barriers. If you have a localized website, it definitely will help. But content is always the king. You will get more traffic from China if more of your website pages could be indexed by Baidu, Baidu is working quite different from Google.


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