9

Nothing wrong with that, as Google confirmed, they crawl based on URLs' popularity so, in your case, that article must have more internal/external links than the others. URLs that are more popular on the Internet tend to be crawled more often to keep them fresher in our index. Also, John Muller confirmed that on Twitter. In addition, how Google's ...


3

There is no need to worry about this. In fact, it's a good thing, this way google would be able to index your updated content and would increase the chances of your page ranking higher. If you, however, do not want to get your page indexed by google(for any reason whatsoever), there are multiple ways to do that. You can add a noindex tag on the head of ...


2

No, it won't. All you need to focus on is to make things easier for the end-user. Everything else doesn't matter anymore. Google's algorithms are very evolved and what's good for the user is good for robots and ultimately for rankings.


2

Googlebot will see the lazy loaded content after it has been loaded onto the correct page. The page will be taken as a whole once any lazy loaded content or dynamic content has been loaded as Google will evaluate the page as the end user would see it. All that having the exclusion in your robots.txt file will do is prevent Google from listing the endpoint ...


2

If you are using an analytics platform like Google Analytics you can check how much organic traffic are those languages generating. If you remove them, you will not rank anymore and therefore you will lose all that traffic. If you are using Google Search Console you can also check the SEO impact they are generating in the performance report filtering by ...


1

If your sitemap is being submitted in txt format, then it must have a .txt file extension. https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/183668?hl=en


1

URL length does not have much impact on how Googlebot crawls. Changing your URLs will have the biggest effect. Googlebot will forever come back and crawl your old URLs. You will need to implement redirects to the new URLs and maintain those redirects indefinitely. If you change all your URLs, this can significantly increase the number of URLs that ...


1

Is there any source/knowledge out there of what is actually counted in this metric? Back in the day, John Mueller wrote on Google+ that it was a simple HTTP request time. Basically, how long it takes GoogleBot to complete the HTTP request. Is it only pages responding with 200 OK status code or would it also include response times 301s, 410s 404s and ...


1

Quite often the live test can have that sort of issues. It has a limited time to test the page and it tried to re-load all resources to make sure it is showing you the latest version. The real indexing uses caching to store the resources and has longer timeouts so that it can more reliably get everything. What you do want to be careful about is if ...


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