62

.google actually is a valid top level domain (or top level zone), as is '.youtube'. Google applied for those TLDs a long time ago... successfully as we can now see. Google can now further delegate authority within that zone and com.google and other subdomains (or delegated zones) can become valid and be operated. Here's a news article on zdnet about this ...


19

The How... In the past few years icann opened up applications for custom GTLD names, you can take a look at application statuses on the ICANN website. Expect to see many new company names as gTLD in the next few years such as .bbc,.foodnetwork,.hilton etc. Sadly these scheme was only for the super rich or big corps with buckets filled with 100 dollar bills. ...


16

If a registry breaches their ICANN agreement for business or technical reasons, ICANN can force them to transfer data to another registry through the Registry Transition Process. For gTLDs, an RFP is sent out for someone to take over the registry. If no RFPs are received or approved, then the gTLD will be closed in accordance with the gTLD's sunset rules. ...


15

This is related to how the new TLD are administered. Old TLDs can be administered by several parties (.com, .org, .net, .biz, etc . . .) so there is competition in the field because it was viewed as a monopoly when first setup (those TLDs started at $50 back in the day through Network Solutions.) The new rights to .anythinggoes are purchased by a single ...


15

It is almost impossible completely "lock up a brand" by buying it for every top level domain. There are hundreds of top level domains with new ones coming online all the time. Only well funded companies have enough money to spend on that. I have traditionally purchased the .com, .org and .net together. But at this point I'm questioning the necessity of ...


14

From a technical standpoint, it's possible, and there are some examples: http://ai./ http://to./ http://uz./ These are country code TLDs, but the point is that DNS as a technology does support "dotless" domains. However, it appears that most generic TLDs are not allowed to have them due to ICANN polices. According to RFC 7085 such restrictions only apply ...


13

Just count the dots... .co.uk is a top level domain aka first level domain; uk is a TLD. co is a SLD. (Reference: http://www.nominet.uk/uk-domain-names/about-domain-names/uk-domain-family) Although it's common to see .co.uk described as a ccTLD, it's really only the uk part that is the TLD. google.co.uk is a second level domain and an apex domain; ...


10

It is possible for a company with a trademark dispute to take you to court over this, however I would not worry too much about it. They have to make a substantial claim that you have somehow violated their trademark with your given name ("trademarked" whenever you were issued an birth certificate, I would imagine). It's not like you were named &...


10

If we're to go by this 2016 survey, general consumers do not trust the new gTLD domain extensions: We found that roughly half of consumers are uncomfortable visiting websites ending in new domains, and only 9% of consumers feel comfortable doing so. In terms of their overall security, almost half of respondents report feeling less secure online ...


8

They're available… …probably because they're significantly more expensive(from any registrar I've ever seen) than the usual TLDs… …and somewhat desirable to techs because of a cheap I/O joke. The usage itself among web/tech people isn't terribly new. There were several bloggers who started using the TLD years ago that I can't remember at the moment. Over ...


7

If the domains are serving duplicate content, or even similar content with minor variations, you run the risk of being penalized for that by the search engines. At least, that's my understanding from all of the articles I've read. Irrespective of that, there are many reasons you should be using the <link rel="canonical" href="..." /> tag in your page ...


7

There are only two cases I am aware of where Google treats domains differently. Google automatically geotargets ccTLDs to their corresponding country, except for ccTLDs that have been genericized such as .tv, .io, or .me. There is a rumor that Google's algorithm may be less forgiving to TLDs that are free-to-register and/or historically associated with spam,...


6

Although .me is a country code top-level domain (ccTLD), it has been one of the fastest-growing and widely used in history. Consequently it's considered to be generic enough to use for targeting a global audience, as discussed by Matt Cutts here (~1:34). In the case with .me therefore, it should be treated as equally by search engines as generic top-level ...


6

The authoritative list of all TLDs is http://www.iana.org/domains/root/db. The top-level domain .sea is not listed. It may of course be possible to register it with alternative DNS roots, but that’s probably not what you want, because your visitors would have to configure the list of their DNS servers accordingly. cesidianroot.net lists .sea as belonging ...


6

[A]m I just relying on industry/market self-regulation or otherwise? Essentially, yes. Entities called Domain Registries (who are the people who oversee the day-to-day operations of Top Level Domains or "TLDs" such as .xyz) generally have most of the say over the pricing for any "premium" (newer) TLD they control. In the case of .xyz specifically, a ...


6

Initially you didn't say what TLD domain you are talking about, but they are likely similar. [UPDATE] Chris.leonard's answer gives more depth on that issue. [/UPDATE] ICANN states the following: In the 2013 RAA, the Admin, Tech, and Registrant telephone numbers are each required to be present. https://whois.icann.org/en/whoisars-validation-telephone ...


6

There are no cheaty tricks in the case of .dev. The basic gist of it is that the more you pay, the closer you are to the front of the line. Timeline: If you own a trademark, you can get a corresponding .dev domain starting Jan 16 2019 if you pre-register right now. If you don't have a trademark, you can get a desired domain starting Feb 19th for a likely ...


5

Registering myna.me for a web app in a niche market is just fine, especially if you think it works well as a brand for your marketing. Web designers should be more aware that the .me ccTLD is often used for personalized websites. Many large corporate sites (e.g., Facebook, Google, Visa, etc...) have also registered .me domains for URL shortening purposes ...


5

The new TLD operators have had to find a large bond upfront to cover the cost in case their business fails. The cost will go towards paying an "emergency registry operator" and is documented in ICANN's Continued Operations Instrument.


5

It is also worth noting that even if you can technically set up a "dotless" domain name (per depquid's answer), it might cost you a pretty penny. ICANN just auctioned off the rights to control a bunch of new top level domains. The cost of owning a top level domain is $185,000. In addition to the money, the process also involved technical requirements for ...


5

The short answer? No. Speaking from a U.S. perspective: In order for anyone to file a complaint and recover a registered domain, you would have to knowingly register a trademark as a domain name. The term knowingly is a high standard to meet. The trademark owner has to prove that you intentionally and knowingly used a trademark. There are other ...


5

Google's systems treat new gTLDs like other gTLDs. They even wrote a post on the subject a few weeks back to cover off all the misconceptions out there. http://googlewebmastercentral.blogspot.co.uk/2015/07/googles-handling-of-new-top-level.html


5

They're called Top Level Domains or TLD for short. A top-level domain (TLD) is one of the domains at the highest level in the hierarchical Domain Name System of the Internet.1 The top-level domain names are installed in the root zone of the name space. For all domains in lower levels, it is the last part of the domain name, that is, the last label of a ...


5

There are no TLDs that Google finds preferential to others; they are all treated equally in rankings. There are some geo-specific TLDs that Google will default to a specific country and use that as an indicator that the website is more important in a specific geographic region. But all TLDs are treated equally. Google's systems treat new gTLDs like other ...


5

This is just an addendum to Steve's excellent answer, in case anyone sees this and wonders if Steve's answer is applicable to all TLDs mentioned in the revised question (COM, NET and ORG). There are two types of TLDs - global TLDs (gTLDs) and country code TLDs (ccTLDs like .US for the USA or .CN for China). ICANN rules govern gTLDs only. COM, NET, and ORG ...


5

The only authoritative source on this is ICANN/IANA (and despite its name "icannwiki.org" is not run by ICANN so should not be taken as authoritative source) Specifically you can go to the following addresses: https://gtldresult.icann.org/applicationstatus/viewstatus https://gtldresult.icann.org/applicationstatus/stringcontentionstatus If you do a search ...


5

There is no possible canonical answer. For 2012 new gTLD round, each applicant was coming with some kind of business plan, for what it wants to do with the TLD. Some are restricted to a brand, some to a geography, some are bound by other restrictions, and some are completely open. If you go to https://gtldresult.icann.org/applicationstatus/viewstatus and ...


5

TL;DR No one can predict the future (so theoretically the case you present can happen, in practice I wouldn't bet on it), especially because ICANN, in charge of TLDs creation has a lot of rules and procedures, that change over time, with decisions that can later be appealed, reversed, upheld, and redone. So expect the unexpected. Now, in more details (the ...


4

Anyone can snatch up an expiring domain and it doesn't even require being at the computer when it expires. There are many companies that you can use that you can use to snap up a expiring domain, they will hammer the registration servers in the final hours when its due to be released. These companies have request limits and actually pay for the requests, its ...


4

It sounds like you are serving the same content (targeting the same locale) with all your TLDs/domains. In which case you should 301 redirect all domain variations to your preferred (canonical) domain (ie. the advertised example.org.uk domain). If you don't redirect then... You could encounter duplicate content issues if people/bots find and link to the ...


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