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22

This happens when a page includes a hreflang link to an alternate language, but the linked page doesn't link back to it. This Official Google Webmaster Central Blog post explains that: Annotations must be confirmed from the pages they are pointing to. If page A links to page B, page B must link back to page A, otherwise the annotations may not be ...


7

...is it considered to be duplicate content if the site is in another language which happens to be an exact duplicate? Google doesn't consider the same content translated into different languages as duplicate content since the same content in English that's translated into French is different, unlike the same content appearing twice in English, as ...


6

The idea of the rel="alternate" hreflang="xx-XX", as I understand it, is ultimately to stop duplicate (or near duplicate) content that is intended for discrete regions from competing with itself or being actively penalised as duplicate content. So the specification of alternates won't stop them from showing in search in regions that aren't targeted (or ...


6

You're better off creating a multilingual sitemap, just to avoid any source of confusion. The format you have shown is correct. In fact, you could even drop the hreflang declarations in your page sections and just use the declaration within the sitemap. The Official Webmaster Tools blog explains the advantages of using the multilingual sitemaps ...


5

Definitely keep the <link> tags in your <head> section. I've never read anywhere that Google actually acknowledges rel="alternate" on <a> tags. Also many other bots may only retrieve the <head> of your documents, so if those <link> tags aren't in the header, they may never actually see them. But I don't think that having the rel=...


5

Whereas the answer by Andrew makes sense and is in line with the official response by Google, I see 3 types of errors in my website: A URL containing an URL-encoded URL is linked back using the properly encoded URL. E.g. http://example.com%3Flang%3Dzh is linked back as http://example.com?lang=zh - there is not much I can do if someone is linking my site ...


4

Ok. Found the answer at: Help Google serve the correct language to your visitors We need to have a url tag for each of the url and specify the others as alternate urls.


4

The problem you have is caused by the combination of canonical and hreflang. Your setup Given your example: for the URL https://example.com/au/publications?count=50&page=4 you specify the following: <link rel="canonical" href="https://example.com/au/publications"> <link rel="alternate" hreflang="en-US" href="https://example.com/us/...


4

Google supports: Link Hreflang HTTP Header Hreflang Sitemap Hreflang Using <link rel="alternate" href="#" hreflang="en-ie" /> within the <body>and not the <head>, testing it in W3C validator fails and reports the following: W3C A link element must not appear as a descendant of a body element unless the link element has an ...


4

You'll have better user metrics, if you create slugs in language according to the language version: users will easier remind about page addresses to visit them twice, users will faster understand the page's topics reading them in their mother tongue, in general, you get all benefits of using mother tongue instead of foreign language. But note! such setup ...


4

To answer your questions: If you do not have localized country-specific versions of your site live at the https://www.construct.net/en-us and https://www.construct.net/fr-fr URLs, then remove those lines. By just having en and fr, they will act as a catchall for all language regions. Google shouldn't be showing the French version in normal English results, ...


3

No you cannot do this using hreflang, they are primarily for language and location is optional, but you cannot just mark up the location: Do not specify a country code by itself! Google does not automatically derive the language from the country code. Use hreflang for language and regional URLs I think the other option here is to try and detect what ...


3

You need to have separate URLs for Google to be able to index them separately. Using the same URLs for multiple languages won't work. You can dynamically serve the content on a single URL, but the individual language content needs to be on separate URLs too.


3

This looks pretty spot on to me, apart from on the Spanish desktop site set, where there are quite a few errors. You are referencing the mobile version with the three rel="alternate" hreflang= tags, you should be referencing the desktop version. The canonical tag on the Spanish desktop is pointing to the English language page. If you need to set a ...


3

The webmaster tool started to show me the hreflang tags about 8 days after putting them online. Thus, I guess one should expect those values to be updated - at least from the webmaster console viewpoint - only twice per month or so.


3

The hreflang tags are on all these URLs yet Google hasn't pick up the global site Assuming that you're intending the last link to be the "global site", since you indicated that to be default page with hreflang="x-default", which doesn't target any specific language or locale, then it's not necessary to specify the canonical link on each language specific ...


3

If you don't have a specific locale, you can just specify the language. Google give an example here: rel="alternate" hreflang="x" If you have several alternate URLs targeted at users with the same language but in different locales, it's a good idea to provide a generic URL for geographically unspecified users. For example, you may have specific ...


3

rel="alternate" hreflang="x" annotations cannot be used to specify a city, or any other geographical content other than the Language and region: hreflang supported values The value of the hreflang attribute identifies the language (in ISO 639-1 format) and optionally the region (in ISO 3166-1 Alpha 2 format) of an alternate URL. For example: I doubt ...


3

Adding nofollow generally does not prevent Googlebot from discovering content. See: Does a "nofollow" attribute on a link prevent URL discovery by search engines? If the nofollow link is the only link to that page, then Google won't index it. In your case, I highly doubt that your alternate language links are the only links into your other sites. Once ...


3

We would set up an hreflang="en" or hreflang="x-default" for the primary site, and an hreflang=en-uk just for the UK site Couple of corrections here. For the global English content hreflang="en" would be correct, not hreflang="x-default". The latter is reserved for language selectors and conditionally redirecting pages, per Google's hreflang ...


3

You explicitely requested an indexing of some urls, through sitemap or webmaster tools, which are duplicates without canonical. The question is rather why do you want duplicated urls are explicitely indexed? It is not according to good SEO practices. Set your duplicated urls to noindex or, at least set a canonical so Google knows what to rank instead of ...


3

In short, no. The "Supported language/region codes" section of Google's hreflang guidelines is fairly unambiguous: The value of the hreflang attribute identifies the language (in ISO 639-1 format) and optionally the region (in ISO 3166-1 Alpha 2 format) of an alternate URL. The use of the word "region" there is perhaps confusing. ISO 3166-1 Alpha 2 codes ...


3

Wherever you put the hreflang is fine you have to use only one of the above methods. Find the methods suggested by Google here: Tell Google about localized versions of your page Methods for indicating your alternate pages There are three ways to indicate multiple language/locale versions of a page to Google: HTML Tags HTTP Headers Sitemap ...


3

The a hreflang attribute is indeed a semantically correct way to signal that a linked page is in a different language than the current page. Regarding SEO, it never makes sense to worry about the possible detriment of adding a few bytes here and there. It would take about 50-100KB of extra page weight before I would even consider splitting hairs, and ...


2

Very few sites get this right, the complex permutations are very confusing. It appears that you may have two different issues here: 1st Example (Careers): You are indicating, using the rel=alternate reference, that there are other versions of that URL, when there is only one. You only need to self-reference when there are other alternates. This circular ...


2

Google appears to have a bug. Other people have been asking about this in the Google product forums. Google's Christopher Semturs says: …we are looking into this. As long as you do not get a mail with better examples you should not worry, the general setup looks sane.


2

Yes 100% always see this http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TxahHF_MD2Q and this https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/156184?hl=en


2

Google's John Mueller has answered the question "should I include every single page of my blog in the Sitemap (including tag pages and the date-based archives) or just the important ones?": It’s always a good idea for your XML Sitemap file to include all pages which you want to have indexed. While he says that it is a "good idea" it shouldn't be ...


2

Since your domains are different for your English site and German site, there really is no need to use hreflang as covered here by Google. If you had a single domain for a multilingual site that served content in more than one language, then you'd want to use hreflang. Even though the two sites will focus on the same subject, you won't run into duplicate ...


2

Nothing will happen. If you know that you're implementing it like this, you probably want to achieve something with it though, so maybe you should just implement it properly? :-)


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