10

.se is not on Google's list of generic top level domains that can be geo-targeted. That means that Google will always treat it as targeted to Sweden and nothing can change that. You will need to create a second site on a .nl domain or on one of the generic domains from Google's list if you want to target a site to the Netherlands. Your only option is ...


8

I'm not aware of anything explicit from Google that specifically advises translating URLs to local language, however they have acknowledged that keywords in URLs do help. You can see that Google (and Bing) is doing something with URL keywords by the way they're bolded in search results. That being established, it's a reasonable extension to say that ...


6

As Stephen points out in comments, geo-IP redirects are generally bad for SEO (it prohibits the site from being crawled naturally and can at times hinder users through being redirected incorrectly). However, specialized bikes would appear to get around the SEO issues with sitemaps containing the different language versions (hreflang). (And only redirecting ...


5

This has mostly been answered in the comments but I wanted to add a little bit to it... If you're targeting a global market with your domain then you should use a .com TLD. This should be done for a few simple reasons. If you're starting from scratch it will be easier to rank globally using a .com TLD than a country code Users are more comfortable ...


3

You can do this with DNS if you use a service such as Route53: DNS GeoProximity Trafic Routing If you wanted to setup your own DNS server to do this kind of thing you could look into technologies such as GeoDNS with BIND. A different approach would be to use load balancing software such as HAProxy to geolocate the user, and then pass the traffic to your ...


3

Google maintains a list of top level domains that are geo-targetable. There are a few country code TLDs on that list: .ad .as .bz .cc .cd .co .dj .fm .io .la .me .ms .nu .sc .sr .su .tv .tk .ws However, if your TLD isn't on that list, you are out of luck. Google Webmaster Tools will not allow you to geo-target most country code domains to something ...


3

Google does not allow many country top level domains (ccTLDs) to be geo-targetted globally. This includes com.au. There is no way to get a com.au domain to show up in global Google search, only in Google searches from Australia. If you want a generic TLD that can be targeted globally in Google search, you must choose one from this list published by Google....


3

The cheapest way to accomplish this would be to setup a sub-domain for each. eu.yoursite.com and us.yoursite.com Then when they first arrive on yoursite.com you can use a tool to determine their geolocation based on IP such as: http://www.ip2location.com/ or http://dev.maxmind.com/geoip/geolite Set a cookie to direct them to the most appropriate subdomain....


3

Wherever feasible, ccTLDs should be first preference. Google recognise them and try to target a site accordingly. User preference should be considered too, as users in some countries exhibit strong preferences for sites on their own ccTLD. For example, a "survey conducted by AFNIC in June 2010 showed a marked preference among French people for .fr domain ...


3

Is it bad practice to use .ie as our top-level domain with subdirectories for our other country pages? Yes, unfortunately it is. Google considers pages on ccTLDs as belonging to the region specified by the ccTLD, therefore, whatever you're trying to do, Google might still think the country-subfolders might belong to Ireland instead of the UK or the ...


2

It's also worth remembering that the search results you see in Google are influenced by the location of the person searching. Also, if you are logged in to a Google Account at the time of the search other factors can come into play that will influence the search results you are shown.


2

In short, no, but you can minimise the extent to which it happens. If a page is relevant to a search term - regardless of the searcher's location and the website's geographic focus - it will be returned. As a result, there is an inevitable degree of overlap between sites on the same topic aimed at English speaking markets like the US, UK, Canada, etc. You'...


2

To isolate the problem, first try it without the redirect. If it still doesn't work, then make sure that the httpd user (e.g. nobody) has read access to the GeoIP database files, as covered in the Troubleshooting section here. Also make sure that each line in your .htaccess file or main server config ends in a newline, and remove the spacing before ...


2

IP addresses are assigned in blocks to various owners and then typically leased out to yet others, who assign them variously to customers or locations, they are not assigned by geograpic location per se. There isn't really a way to determine what location has been assigned what IP address other than to get the IP address of the location, at least that I am ...


2

Googlebot does have IP addresses located in other countries. For a (likely incomplete) list, see the following link and click on each IP address listed there to see its country of origin: Bots vs Browsers - User Agent Details for "+http://www.googlebot.com/bot.html" You could add these IP's, and others you might find elsewhere, as exclusions to your IP ...


2

The answer depends a lot on what sort of business you're running and what sort of content you could offer for local branches. But, generally speaking, Google+ Local/Google Places for Business is a great tool to use if you want to optimise for local search. That's the source for local search listings like these: You'd do a bulk upload of your locations ...


2

When you website is targeted to a specific country, you will rank better in that country and much worse everywhere else in the world. Unless your top level domain is on Google's list of generic top level domains, you won't be able to use it for a website that targets a global audience and gets traffic from Google search.


2

I am not an expert on GEO Targeting, but I did do some research for another question and was not surprised by the answer. If a domain name is registered by a ccTLD (country code), there are two things that happen from Google's point of view. One, it knows what data centers should be populated primarily, and two, where searches are likely to come from. All of ...


2

Your server's location (or that of CDN nodes) can influence geographic targeting, but relative to other factors it's minor. Things like your choice of TLD, using geotargeting in Webmaster Tools (Google and Bing), alternate language markup (supported by Google and Yandex) and various code signals like the lang attribute of the <html> element, or Content-...


2

Geo targeting in AdWords generally includes not just people that are actually in your targeted location but also people that: Search for your targeted location View pages in your targeted location If you target to the United States, you may end up advertising to people that view US websites from out of the country. This behavior of targeting can be ...


2

Would Google (and others) know to list our website in other searches and not just UK (where our server is based)? The only way to make sure is using sub-folders for each of your target countries, just as you suggested, AND use the hreflang annotation. If the currencies are different, but the rest of the content is the same, you might still be fine with the ...


2

Yes, folders can be named and targeted the same way that subdomains can be. You can add folders to Google Webmaster Tools and set the targeting there for each folder. The only drawback to folders compared to subdomains is that you can't move the hosting into the country being targeted. Geographic location of the server can be an important signal to ...


2

should those sub-directories be named the same way you would use the ccTLD? According to the Google Webmaster Tools on Multi-regional and multilingual sites under "URL structures" for subdirectories, you can use gTLDs as a subdirectory, however, as Google states here in regards specifying which URLs to use for multilingual regions: Do not specify a ...


2

This should be fine. It probably doesn’t affect SEO. Consumers would have no reason to parse the URL path segment if they could just parse the rel-alternate+hreflang markup instead, which is typically easier and more reliable. Any way, even if the URL path segment is used by some consumers, both types are valid language tags after all. For what it’s worth,...


2

With toys in their millions, All under one roof, It's Called Toys'R'Us! Unless you have good specific reasons why not to host your website under one roof then generally speaking it is far better to use sub folders rather than sub domains or other domains. Using sub folders such as /fr/ and /ch/ will give your domain more authority because your SEO WILL ...


2

Use hreflang to target the two sites to their respective markets. This markup is supported by Google and Yandex, but not Bing etc., which may or may not be an issue depending on your traffic sources. Google's John Mueller has confirmed that the same content can be targeted to multiple markets, and I've had clients successfully deploy this approach. For ...


2

Your configuration is incorrect. Rather than permanently redirect the root to https://www.amolelingue.com/en. Either: Do a conditional redirect, i.e. test the user's browser language and do a temporary redirect to the appropriate language page, /en, /it or /fi. Don't redirect the root at all, and have a page on which users can select the version they want....


2

<link rel="alternate" href="example.com/pt/" hreflang="pt-pt" /> The same annotations should appear on your French and Portuguese homepages. It is still possible that Mexican, French Canadian, and Brazilian customers could see your site (remember, hreflang is a signal not a directive) Source: https://moz.com/learn/seo/hreflang-tag Your ...


2

There are a couple of ways on how to tackle this, regardless of your location: Make sure that your pages are clearly stating where your services are being offered to. This is a content issue, not a logical one. So if you plan to offer your services in 50 states, make sure that you name them all, not just "in 50 states". Give each state a separate landing ...


2

Should Geo-targeting Subdomains have their own dedicated Social Media Profiles? There is no particular answer for this and totally depends on the vision you have for the website. we create/use dedicated Social Media Profiles for Brand Awareness and helping customers have updates on what's going on. Does Dedicated Social Media Profiles for Geo-...


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