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There are many acceptable ways to structure your site for both SEO and internationalization. Each have advantages and disadvantages. Top Level Domains Buy the same domain name at multiple top level country domains like example.com, example.es and example.de. Advantages Fully supported by Google. You can add the sites to Google Webmaster Tools where ...


12

Google Analytics Spam is linking to THIS discussion thread now. If you got to this thread because you saw a referral in your Google Analytics, YOU HAVE BEEN FOOLED. Check the Language for those referrals ("...Vote for Trump"), then read this article for the details and a filtering solution: http://www.analyticsedge.com/2016/11/heres-a-secret-%C9%A2oogle-com-...


10

You can ignore this. It has no impact on your site.¹ What is happening? When requesting resources from your site, clients (i.e., bots, humans using a browser, …) can send additional request headers (e.g., User-Agent, Referer, Accept) with values of their choice. The Accept-Language request header tells the server which language(s) are acceptable for the ...


8

I'm not aware of anything explicit from Google that specifically advises translating URLs to local language, however they have acknowledged that keywords in URLs do help. You can see that Google (and Bing) is doing something with URL keywords by the way they're bolded in search results. That being established, it's a reasonable extension to say that ...


8

Some SEOs are wary of using these non-Latin characters in URLs because of the way it might display in certain browsers, or in certain text cases when the link is copied and pasted somewhere online. While having spammy-looking links is never a good thing, I personally think the possible benefit in search results is worth the drawback. For example,...


8

Looks like it. This example comes from the HTML5 specs: For example, the following link is a French translation that uses the PDF format: <link rel=alternate type=application/pdf hreflang=fr href=manual-fr>


7

...is it considered to be duplicate content if the site is in another language which happens to be an exact duplicate? Google doesn't consider the same content translated into different languages as duplicate content since the same content in English that's translated into French is different, unlike the same content appearing twice in English, as ...


6

The problem with your set-up (from an SEO standpoint) is that search engines don't accept cookies, so whenever a bot follows a link to your root domain, it'll be sent to your English content. Hopefully, there's an abundance of links to the other language content, too, but in my experience, this situation nevertheless seems to lie at the root of a lot of ...


6

The idea of the rel="alternate" hreflang="xx-XX", as I understand it, is ultimately to stop duplicate (or near duplicate) content that is intended for discrete regions from competing with itself or being actively penalised as duplicate content. So the specification of alternates won't stop them from showing in search in regions that aren't targeted (or ...


6

There is no big SEO advantage using either top level domains, sub-domains, or sub-directories. This is well covered in the question: How should I structure my URLs for both SEO and localization? The biggest differences are going to be: Top level domains and sub-domains allow you to move the hosting near the users by getting servers that are in the correct ...


5

You should use the lang attribute (e.g., on the html element) to declare the language, not a meta tag. This allows you to overwrite the language declaration for other parts on the page (note the lang attributes in my example markup for a language switcher). Anyway, having a few words in a different language shouldn’t affect your SEO at all, whether you use ...


5

One thing to note is that when Google suggests, "This page is in XYZ" and offers translation, it doesn't necessarily mean it thinks the entire page is in that language. Even if it thinks that just a very small part of the page is in that language it offers the same option to translate the page. In your example, if you click on the translate link, ...


5

Permalinks, like all other site content, should be in the native language of the website if possible. As far as I know, there is no SEO benefit to having permalinks in a different language from the website content, and it would seem to me to be a poor choice regarding user experience. If you think about it, your Polish-speaking customers are not going to ...


4

As of Jun 10, 2014 Google recommends either ccTLDs, Subdomains with gTLDs or Sub-directories with gTLDs. URL parameters such as ?lang=en are not recommended: https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/182192?hl=en#2 (Funny that the page which says that it's not recommended to use URL parameters for this, is actually doing exactly this.)


4

I ended up emailing Google. MY LETTER If my website is written in English, but I allow my visitors to temporarily translate the page using the Google Translate tool, do I need to remove unsupported adsense languages from the Google Translate tool? Since the translation is a temporary one I assume that the language is primarily in English and thus not in ...


4

Well, I don't know how to merge them into Google Analytics, but I can answer the first question. de or de_de are (obsiously) the same. They are Language tags. de is a Language subtag de-de is a Region subtag. A few examples of language tags: fr: French language, en-AU: English language, as written and spoken in Australia, az-Latn-IR, Azeri language, ...


4

If your site is handling personal data then it must (i.e. its practices for handling personal data must) comply with EU data protection laws (see the EU Data Protection Directive 95/46/EC for the definition of personal data). However, there is nowhere in the European Union a requirement for a website to have its privacy policy posted - except for "cookies". ...


4

I don't speak Albanian, but I ran a little test on google.al. When I type keng in the search box, it offered me kenge and keng popullore in the drop box. keng popullore returns many music videos and some include the këngë spelling in their title. This confirms what I thought. Google can deal with incorrect spellings in your language. If I were you, I would ...


4

You'll have better user metrics, if you create slugs in language according to the language version: users will easier remind about page addresses to visit them twice, users will faster understand the page's topics reading them in their mother tongue, in general, you get all benefits of using mother tongue instead of foreign language. But note! such setup ...


4

To answer your questions: If you do not have localized country-specific versions of your site live at the https://www.construct.net/en-us and https://www.construct.net/fr-fr URLs, then remove those lines. By just having en and fr, they will act as a catchall for all language regions. Google shouldn't be showing the French version in normal English results, ...


3

"Does my website have to publish a privacy policy?" What Gisle Hannemyr's comment states might be misleading. Technically speaking you need to inform your users, but the standard way to do so is by having a privacy policy posted on your website. As further addition, consider that the California Online Privacy Protection Act (in practice reflecting on any ...


3

Adding nofollow generally does not prevent Googlebot from discovering content. See: Does a "nofollow" attribute on a link prevent URL discovery by search engines? If the nofollow link is the only link to that page, then Google won't index it. In your case, I highly doubt that your alternate language links are the only links into your other sites. Once ...


3

No you cannot do this using hreflang, they are primarily for language and location is optional, but you cannot just mark up the location: Do not specify a country code by itself! Google does not automatically derive the language from the country code. Use hreflang for language and regional URLs I think the other option here is to try and detect what ...


3

The fact that http://www.productontology.org/id/Vinothek works (it redirects to http://www.productontology.org/id/Enoteca) is not because it’s called "Vinothek" in German, but because the English Wikipedia has a redirect from Vinothek to Enoteca. The PTO only uses the terms from the English Wikipedia: You can use this ontology to describe any object for ...


3

I think it’s better to include the language code for the default language, too. Quoting the pros from my answer on Stack Overflow: If you decide to change the default language, you don’t have to change your URLs. Consistency. It allows you to redirect from / based on the visitor’s language preference. It’s a signal that your site is available in ...


3

Try this in the <head> section: <meta charset="UTF-8"> <meta name="google" content="notranslate"> <meta http-equiv="Content-Language" content="en">


3

If the specified font doesn’t contain a glyph for a character, browsers typically use a fallback font to render this character. (Browsers don’t have do this, of course, and how it exactly works might also depend on the operating system. But it would be really suprising if there were browsers that don’t use fallback fonts. Not to mention that there are many ...


3

First off, I want to address the decision over language - as I initially thought that you would want to use both languages on your website... but the more I researched, the more I realized that it is not as straightforward as, for example, debating whether or not to use English or Spanish for a website. The more I learned, the more I realized that answering ...


3

@BenoitLussier If you read my answer, English is (to some degree) naturally integrated into the Sinhala Language. Not to mention, Google understands the user's language based on their interface settings. I never suggested the use of any additional code. Google knows the role of English in Sinhala. This ultimately comes down to a judgment call. Much of ...


3

Google determines language by running your page through a machine learning algo, they don't use tags: Google uses the visible content of your page to determine its language. We don’t use any code-level language information such as lang attributes, or the URL. You can help Google determine the language correctly by using a single language for content and ...


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