3

In my experience - yes. But this isn't tied to the indexing of sitemap urls. Submitting of the sitemap into GSC helps you just to monitor your sitemap urls. However the sitemap can be discovered by Googlebot independently of GSC submission. And Google is able to index your sitemap urls independently of the fact the sitemap was submitted into GSC or not. ...


3

Unfortunately, you can not edit the current property. However, you can keep the current property as it is and add a new property with 'https'. You would be able to track and analyse the data for the new property from the date it is added as a verified property in your search console and on the side, you can see the historic data of your old property. I ...


3

Much of the answer depends upon the site itself. For example, a few of my sites should not see much traffic at all. For example, one is for my apartment building. Short of a few pages of content intended to help tenants, there is no real reason to visit the site unless you are looking for an apartment. Another is for an antiques business site. It is one ...


3

If you haven't noticed any problems from these links, you can safely ignore them. Googlebot usually knows how to ignore poor quality links without you taking any action. The fact that these pages now return 500 status means that Googlebot will not be able to see the links anymore either next time it crawls. Other answers suggest using the disavow tool. ...


3

The answer is to remove the property and then re add the property. Google Console prompts you to verify via DNS when you re-add. This helpful siteground article helped me out: https://my.siteground.com/support/kb/site-tools-vs-cpanel-comparison-create-aaaa-srv-txt-records Edit: Upon coming back the next morning, when I ran some of my urls through the URL ...


2

The total number of clicks and total impressions are fluctuating, but overall they are moving upwards, which is a good thing. It will increase once the average position improves and CTR increases. The CTR seems to be on the lower end of the spectrum. It can be improved by optimising for relevant keywords to reach the desired customer segment and further ...


2

Thanks to the comment by @closetnoc and the helpful link to nvd.nist.gov/vuln/search I was able to troubleshoot the problem. The solution is a fresh reinstall of Wordpress on the server (Bluehost helped me with this) and then a backup from VaultPress (If you have VaultPress). Otherwise, manually add the backups, but don't add the core files. Since those were ...


2

You need to tell Google that your new domain name is your canonical domain name for the content on the site, otherwise Google won’t index the new domain since it is duplicating content. You can move to a new domain name by using 301 redirects from each page available on the old domain to the equivalent URL with the new domain. (Implementation of this ...


2

Pages serving content depending on parameters aren't necessarily a problem for Google, unless they have essentially duplicate content to each other. There are several ways of handling this: Noindex: Add a no-index tag to the results pages which serve this duplicated content or disallow spidering in the robots.txt file. This will instruct Google to simply ...


2

Ok, this was tricky because Google's suggestions are deceitful: Google talks about "clickable elements too close to each other" and "small text", but looking at the screenshot, the problem is that the video container is too big (despite the responsive wrapper). Considering that there's an error type in the tool called "content bigger than the screen", I ...


2

I can't read the language the report is in, but I am guessing from what I can gather that the reason is that the default YouTube embed method involves an iframe which is a default number of pixels. While this is fine for a computer's browser to handle, it's not best practice for mobile devices. It is possible to embed in a responsive way, so that the video ...


1

There should be no data loss, but the new domain property may take a while to populate. Note that some integrations do not support domain properties yet. Like linking to Google Analytics. I'd not delete any site level properties. Keep them as a backup. Even consider adding the www variants.


1

I followed the sample on schema.org/BreadcrumbList and noticed that I am missing the position meta tag: <meta itemprop="position" content="1" /> I also found Google's breadcrumb testing tool for verification. The original breadcrumb was showing the following errors: I added the position meta tag: <ul class="nav-breakcrumb" itemscope="" itemtype="...


1

From my experience you cannot tell how long it will take for your images to be shown in Google Image search. Factors that can affect the speed are: How much content your site has. How much of a niche your site is. How good is your site in terms of end user value. How good is your site in terms of SEO. How popular your site is. If it's brand new site then ...


1

I wait longer and it shows up.


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