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5

The first reason is competition. The registrar cannot force you to stay with them and there are tons of registrars. If they charged you 10 times their public price you'd just go to the next one. The second reason is economics. If your domain is famous, you probably need a lot of other stuff : emails, servers, IPs... If they lost all their big customers, ...


3

Most people choose to pay for hosting for multiple reasons. Site availability: A personal computer isn't really built for serving a website to however many visitors you would get. Most people turn their PCs off from time to time, and most people have limited bandwidth for their internet connection. So, if your site suddenly got popular, most people's ...


3

The only authoritative source on this is ICANN/IANA (and despite its name "icannwiki.org" is not run by ICANN so should not be taken as authoritative source) Specifically you can go to the following addresses: https://gtldresult.icann.org/applicationstatus/viewstatus https://gtldresult.icann.org/applicationstatus/stringcontentionstatus If you do a search ...


2

I don't think the future registry has been appointed yet. Apparently you still have 3 applicants and it hasn't been decided who will own .DATA in the end. Also there seems to be a "warning" on the Dish application because of anti-trust/anti-competition issues. Source : https://icannwiki.org/.data What's for sure : don't expect it in 2019...


2

SSH can use a domain name. ssh uname@example.com/me -p 1234 would not be correct, however, the /me may be ignored and still work. You should not need to use ssh uname@me.example.com -p 1234. In fact, this would take some configuration changes to make work when it should not be necessary at all. What should happen is this. If you use your domain name, it ...


2

Besides the fact that your question may depend on the TLD, the answer is "probably nothing", except that if this practice becomes known I think it would attract bad buzz and hence clients going elsewhere. Also as comments hinted at, you are free to transfer your domain to another registrar at any time (after 60 days) and since you are also free to renew at ...


2

Is there any risk of legal action if I proceed and buy the .io domain? There is always risk. The question is how much risk you can sustain which often also translates in how big of a budget you have to pay your lawyers. And the question is almost impossible to answer in general, it hugely depends on the name (since bigdata.io is already reserved, it is of ...


1

I think for a beginner, trying to figure out such intricacies will not be beneficial in your own interest. Why not instead do practical projects related with web development and such concerns will gradually be addressed along the way.


1

Not likely. "Big data" are industry terms often used as a phrase. And while there may be a trademark for BigData (I don't know if there is or not), trademarks are not generally defensible if they contain common terms or phrases especially within an industry. As long as you are not trying to confuse any trademark with any similar look and feel for their site ...


1

I asked the same question to godaddy and Reply from godaddy is, We may buy the domain from godaddy like this, however, if his tech giant company files copy right related issues since Google and Facebook keywords are the brands they own, you may have legal issues.


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