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7

An organization called ICANN (The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers) contracts with registries to manage the registration of top level domains (TLDs). In the case of .com, Verisign is the company who manages that TLD. Verisign then works with registrars to resell .com domain names. ICANN places limits on how much Verisign and registrars can ...


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how those domains prices get establish? There is nothing to understand. Registries decide the price of their premium domain names based on what they want and how much they think they should cost that is how much they think people are prepared to pay for them (technically, for a registry, any single name is exactly like any other, it means that the cost to ...


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You say that only one computer/browser still redirects away to another website, and that the redirect is gone on all the other machines you've tried. This sounds to me like maybe that one browser cached a 301 redirect, and is using this cached redirect without even trying to look up the domain in DNS at all anymore. The way to test this is to use an ...


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All of the .com (gTLD) and .com "subdomain" domains are treated similarly in the Google search engine. By default they don't target any country in particular. You can set a gTLD to target a specific country by using Google's International Targeting report tool. Do note that if you use a subdomain, Google may treat your website as being "part of the same ...


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Subdomains are domains. The site doesn't seem to suggest that you specifically need a public suffix domain, which is what most people think of when they say "domain", so you should be able to use a subdomain just fine. As Stephen mentioned, you could use a Dynamic DNS address. Another option if you're using cloud hosting is to take the subdomain directly ...


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Also, registries paid a lot of money for the rights to a gTLD. They are trying to recoup their outlay plus make a profit that covers their running costs. If a domain extension isn't likely to be all that popular e.g. .dealer, the cost per registration is going to be higher. Aside: I imagine all the very cool .dealer domains are gone...they have to do ...


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I've got a domain on a registrar, which is in its grace period. I'd like to move it to a new registrar, so I think releasing it will be the best option. I had the impression releasing a domain name makes it available for registration again, but I have a worrying warning from my old registrar when about to release it The terminology you are using is ...


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A registrar detags a domain because for some reason they are assuming you don't want to renew. The detagging ensures that they are not billed by the registry for a domain you seemingly don't want. There don't seem to be any information on whether the domain becomes available immediately for registration.


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If I understand your question, you're asking how the web server knows which domain to send the request to. You are correct about host headers. HTTP(S) 1.1 added host headers as a way for web servers to host more than one host/domain. When you make a request via your web browser, it sends a request via HTTP(S). The protocol includes both the IP ...


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Make sure you're adding your TXT record to www as Google wants, not just to the bare domain.


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