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28

You have a misconception of what a sitemap is. The sitemap is used to audit the site crawl by the search engine bot. The sitemap and crawling a site are two different and independent things. Google will continue to crawl your site independently of any sitemap. The sitemap will be used to audit/see if Google is able to properly crawl your site. For example, ...


19

Google does index XML sitemaps (like any XML file). If Google is aware of a URL and it returns a valid response then it's going to pass Google's inclusion rules and could get indexed. Personally, I only submit the sitemap through GWT and include a Sitemap: reference in robots.txt and this is certainly enough to get it indexed. The recommended method to ...


18

Closetnoc is correct about sitemaps. Don't expect them to limit what URLs Google will crawl and index. In fact sitemaps have little to no influence over SEO. See The Sitemap Paradox Google won't complain about errors from your old URLs if you redirect them. When you change your site's URL structure it is best to redirect all the old URLs to their ...


14

I'm not sure if this changed over the years since this was asked; while in theory you can (as the first answer states), in practice Google at least will give you an error (as seen in their Webmaster Tools): Incorrect Sitemap index format: Nested Sitemap indexes The Google help page further states: A sitemap index file can't list other sitemap index ...


14

In your header you have a canonical link (on line 11, just under <title>). It looks like this on your page: <link href="http://escene.ir/component/products/?task=view.12" rel="canonical" /> This element tells Google your preferred URL for a page which has several urls to choose from. This is to prevent you from being penalized for having ...


14

MrWhite's answer about using X-Robots-Tag appears to be the correct way to do this. Here is code that can be used in .htaccess or Apache configuration files to do so. (Reference: WebmasterWorld - Sitemaps showing up in SERP - How to prevent this?) <Files ~ "sitemap.*\.xml(\.gz)?$"> Header append X-Robots-Tag "noindex" </Files> Under nginx ...


12

You can have multiple sitemaps per website, and this is a great example of when that makes sense. You should make sure you have a Sitemap Index listing each of your sitemaps. It will probably look something like: <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <sitemapindex xmlns="http://www.sitemaps.org/schemas/sitemap/0.9"> <sitemap> ...


12

You can make any file dynamic. The best way to do so is not through redirects, but through rewrite rules. RewriteRule ^robots\.txt$ /robots.php [L] That way, you power it with a dynamic script, but the URL doesn't change. Most crawlers (including Googlebot) will follow redirects for robots.txt, but some crawlers will get confused if you introduce ...


11

Generally, you have to use a separate sitemap for each host (i.e., different protocol, domain, or subdomain): From the FAQ "Where do I place my Sitemap?": All URLs listed in the Sitemap must reside on the same host as the Sitemap. For instance, if the Sitemap is located at http://www.example.com/sitemap.xml, it can't include URLs from http://...


8

No, you don't need to submit a sitemap for the version (here with www) you don't want to use. Remember submitting a sitemap to your Google Webmaster Tools account helps indexing of the site. Therefore, you submit a sitemap only for a site you want to see in Google's index.


8

As per Matt Cutts blog post, he said: A subdomain can be useful to separate out content that is completely different. Google uses subdomains for distinct products such news.google.com or maps.google.com, for example. This is similar to what Blogger (blogspot) does. John's blog (john.blogspot.com) is totally different from Doe's blog (doe.blogspot....


7

A single XML sitemap should not contain a mix of HTTP and HTTPS URLs (i.e. essentially different locations as far as the search engines are concerned). So, the sitemap located at http://example.com/Sitemap.xml should only contain URLs starting http://example.com/ and similar for the HTTPS sitemap. From sitemaps.org: Q: My site has both "http" and "https" ...


7

The purpose of sitemaps is to tell the search engines about the pages in your website that you want them to crawl and index. If new pages are added to your site that you want crawled and indexed then they should be added to your sitemap. If this is occurring daily then you can add them daily. If this is occurring weekly then you can add them weekly. Search ...


7

The sitemap should reflect the way pages should be accessed, if you want them to be accessed by HTTPS, then yes, that is what you have to do. Otherwise, you are just making the server work a bit extra each time it's crawled.


7

We have another question here that ask why items in the sitemap are not ranked better: The Sitemap Paradox. Google's John Mueller has this to say about common SEO misconceptions regarding sitemaps: The Sitemap file isn't meant to "fix" crawlability issues. If your site can't be crawled, fix that first. We don't use Sitemap files for ranking. ...


7

Yes. Everything you ask for is possible. And here's an example XML sitemap file generated by the Drupal XML sitemap module with a little bit of configuration. Everything is done for you out of the box. http://softkube.com/sitemap.xml If you check the code of the XML file there's a link to an XSL and inside that file you can see the code with references to ...


7

You're better off creating a multilingual sitemap, just to avoid any source of confusion. The format you have shown is correct. In fact, you could even drop the hreflang declarations in your page sections and just use the declaration within the sitemap. The Official Webmaster Tools blog explains the advantages of using the multilingual sitemaps ...


7

As closetnoc suggests in comments, the 50,000 URL limit for sitemaps refers to the number of URLs in the sitemap file itself. ie. the number of <loc> elements. This is an individual sitemap limit, not a website limit. (The file must also be no larger than 50MB*1 (uncompressed) - so whichever comes first.) (*1 Previously 10MB.) Then you can also have ...


7

Google will never index HTTPS while the canonicals point to HTTP. I switched my largest site over to HTTPS using the following protocol: Enabled HTTPS for the site without switching canonicals for about two years. During this time period Google sent all traffic to HTTP. Switched the canonical version to HTTPS. It has been running that way for about 8 ...


7

if this difference of ampersand in URL and sitemap will cause any issue. tl;dr No issue, because the URLs are the same. Since in sitemap & has to be escaped I replaced & with &amp; ... Your sitemap is an XML document. As with any XML document, the data values must be stored XML-entity encoded. The & character is a special character (it ...


7

That isn't possible. You need to map your old URLs to the new with redirects for SEO and user experience. Google never forgets about old URLs, even after a decade. When you migrate to a new CMS, you need to implement the page level redirects If there is no equivalent for some particular page you can let it 404 and Google will remove it from the index. ...


6

This post is 4 years old, hope the status in not Pending anymore. But this helped me. After 14 days of pending status, I found this link, to PING bing with your sitemap. It's was a kind of awake call for my sitemap. Few hours later, my site was indexed. Upload your sitemap (but you already did hence the pending status) Typ in your browser: http://www.bing....


6

You are asking two questions here. Does a sitemap need to be XML? The simple answer is no, it doesn't have to be XML. It can be XML file, a text file or RSS/Atom feed (which is basically XML), HTML Sitemap HTML Sitemaps: These are used on your website to display the layout in layers on your website to any customer that would wish too (don't know why they ...


6

http://zhanzhang.baidu.com/sitemap/index is the (sparse) documentation about sitemaps for Baidu. It only describes that it may help to submit your sitemap, and it shows a screenshot of their webmaster tool, listing several sitemaps and their status. However, it seems that they intend this feature only for "high quality" sites, on invitation basis. Here is ...


6

Most likely some part of your web site generated links like that, and that is how Google started to crawl the URLs. You should check the links in your web pages to see where these incorrect URLs are, and you should fix them. Also, you could change your Apache configuration so that requests for any other virtualhost than example.com or www.example.com would ...


6

You need to disable and reenable the sitemap, going to SEO > Sitemap XML. It probably will solve your problem (Yoast bug).


6

Because it is an XML file, the sitemap doesn't support meta tags. Instead it is technically an HTTP header: X-Robots-Tag: noindex You don't want to remove it that header. It prevents the XML sitemap itself from appearing in search results, it doesn't prevent the URLs listed in it from getting indexed. If you don't put a noindex in, the sitemap itself ...


5

I'm assuming you're referring to an XML Sitemap? If so, then no - the sole purpose of an XML sitemap is to facilitate in the discovery (for indexation) of URLs/Pages. So if you only have one page, then there's no point. If you're worried about being found by search engines, you can either link to your page (from another site, or a twitter/Google+ page), ...


5

You should include to your sitemap all the URLs you want to see in a search engine's index.


5

Ok. Found the answer at: Help Google serve the correct language to your visitors We need to have a url tag for each of the url and specify the others as alternate urls.


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