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Your indexing is going to be spotty. Google may index some of both sites. It will index mostly your international site because Google does most of its crawling from the US. Auto-redirection based on geo-IP address or the Accept-Language header hurts SEO. If you want good SEO, you can't use redirects. Google crawls from all over the world. It expects to ...


2

HTTP redirects happen AFTER the TLS handshake. For the TLS handshake to be successful, the server has to present a valid certificate, having in it the hostname that is in the URL being accessed, otherwise browsers will show errors. So the rule is simple: as soon as you see an https:// URL, even if all accesses to it are finally redirected to another URL, ...


2

You have a misconception about what DNS can do. You say, "I know I can redirect all subdomains ... using a wildcard DNS record." However, DNS can't do redirects at all. All DNS can do is point your domain (or subdomains) to the IP address of a server. Even if you use a CNAME record, DNS doesn't redirect. A CNAME just means that the domain resolves to ...


1

This is a WordPress site and I'm using the Redirection plugin by John Godley. There is an example on the Plugin's "Redirect Regular Expressions" page that appears to do exactly what you need. For example, your "source URL" would be: /listing/old-district/(.*) and corresponding "Target URL" would be: /new-district/$1 The pattern (.*) captures anything (...


1

The solution you are looking for is using a canonical tag to signal Google which of the pages you want INDEXED and shown on Google. A canonical tag transfers the "SEO" value of a URL to a different one but it keeps both online and accessible; a redirect (such as a 301) replaces one with the other. What you want is to add a canonical tag in the example.com/...


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