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Your indexing is going to be spotty. Google may index some of both sites. It will index mostly your international site because Google does most of its crawling from the US. Auto-redirection based on geo-IP address or the Accept-Language header hurts SEO. If you want good SEO, you can't use redirects. Google crawls from all over the world. It expects to ...


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A .gr domain will only ever rank on Google for searchers from Greece. There is no way to target a .gr domain to worldwide users of Google. See I'm using a vanity country code top level domain (ccTLD), can I persuade Google to geotarget a different region?. It doesn't make sense to put your English content on a .gr domain name unless it is focused just for ...


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The answers are all here: Tell Google about localized versions of your page Two of the most important key points to note are: Each language version must list itself as well as all other language versions. and If two pages don't both point to each other, the tags will be ignored. This is so that someone on another site can't arbitrarily create a ...


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Facebook doesn't have to have good SEO. Facebook doesn't need to have lots of content in various languages indexed in Google. If you need to be listed in search engines, don't try to emulate Facebook. Google doesn't really support crawling and indexing several languages at the same URL. A few years ago Google announced that Googlbot was going to start ...


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So if I understand correctly on every page that doesn't have a translation there is a link that goes to a 404 page? Those will all become broken links, because Google will be able to find the Url to the page, but it gives a 404 when it actually arrives. So you'll have to find a way without there being 404 pages. In a website I made, the language switch ...


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It is indeed a very annoying behavior of Google. In a case i personally experienced Google kicked from austrian index the site example.at and ranked instead example.de (both have the same language - german). The cause of ignoring hreflang and deindexing of one ccTLD was explained with "the content of sites hreflang="de-de" and "de-at" is too similar to ...


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Google doesn't like automatic redirects based on geo-ip, because on this way the Googlebot and human visitors are forced to visit certain site/folder. Beside of this, wrong handling of similar content on different tld-domains will cause duplicate content issues. The strategy Google recommends looks like: main domain with hreflangs, on first visit of human ...


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You need to understand two important concepts for internationalization. For proper international targeting you need to use both hreflang attribute and google search console international targeting feature. Using Hreflang attribute you can target people on their language basis. Using Google search console international targeting feature you can target ...


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Google's John Mueller has spoken about this and advises against using automatic geo-redirects: https://twitter.com/JohnMu/status/877043654472466432 The approach I would suggest is using a modal or notification to inform the user that there is a localised version available for them which they can go to (or decide to stay where they are). In terms of local ...


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lastmod, priority, changefreq can be omitted. Include your hreflang urls according to the following example: <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <urlset xmlns="http://www.sitemaps.org/schemas/sitemap/0.9" xmlns:xhtml="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"> <url> <loc>http://www.example.com/english/</loc> <...


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Redirects from one domain to another will have no effect on SEO unless you are enacting a Change of Address. So, buying a new domain and pointing it at your existing website will have zero impact on your SEO. Having a website, which has built up authority and PageRank for its content and backlinks, then being moved onto another website (using 301 redirects ...


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If your developer is using a 301 Redirect then this is the best practice. Google guideline (and I guess guideline from other search engines) is simple on this matter. When you are moving a URL and want to maintain its SEO value implement a 301 Redirect when the change is permanent. Source


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I think you are making it a bit hard on yourself .. if the .com domain is available just buy it and register it with your new identity. for your old domain use domain privacy service to hide your name on that domain and redirect it 301 to your new domain, basically you will need to do that if you want to continue the same SERP exposure and not starting from ...


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Google Guide Managing multi-regional and multilingual sites tells us: Use different URLs for different language versions Google recommends using different URLs for each language version of a page... This means that your versions for English and German content must have separate URLs. Another Google guide Follow the structured data guidelines ...


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I have an idea: I'd write only an English title tag and an article in another language. For the English page, I'd use the English title but all other content would be identical to the other language page. That would be an efficient way to get traffic from foreign counties. Let me consider the following example. Someone created a web page with an ...


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Since both URLs target the same content I suggest using a canonical URL, specifying either the .com or the .gr as the canonical version of your site. If what you wanted was to safeguard your domain from fraud by also purchasing the .com TLD but you actually want to focus / show / target the other domain, you might also want to set up a 301 redirection from ...


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