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5

According to Google's official Search Central dev docs (under the Submit Your Sitemap to Google section), they still require you to ping them when you change your sitemap to make sure it gets crawled. Otherwise, they crawl it once "the first time [they] notice it."


2

Submitting an XML sitemap may or may not get Googlebot to come re-crawl your entire site more quickly than it otherwise would. Google has suggested using temporary sitemaps to trigger recrawls so it may be worth a try. One way to speed this up could be to submit a temporary sitemap file listing these URLs with the last modification date (eg, when you ...


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The purpose of a sitemap is to help search engines find paths that may not be obvious from scanning for links on your page. They are NOT to be used to point to every piece of content on your site and is a waste of effort. In many cases, sites do not need sitemaps at all. On the small-ish sites my company developed, we didn't create any site maps at all.


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I believe the definitive answer is at: Avoid creating duplicate content Google's advice appears to be to use the rel="canonical" tag on the preferred version (maybe the first one or the parent page?), and they specifically do not recommend blocking the crawling of duplicate pages. That said, I expect leaving the similar versions out of the sitemap....


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Your sitemap should not contain redirects. Just pick the URL that you want and don't try and get so many keywords into it with categories. Pick the URL structure you want and just use that.


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When sites and sitemaps are new, Google takes a bit of time to show a change in fetching status. Since that URL is perfectly accessible by Googlebot (returns 200 when changing the User Agent using Chrome Dev tools), I wouldn't worry about Google not being able to see the URLs in your sitemap. Give it a few days to see if that "fetching error" ...


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