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I don't want to question the skills of the marketing department who gave you this advice, but several h1s and therefore the different headings have no impact on SEO (if we put the keywords aside). See: https://searchengineland.com/multiple-h1s-wont-get-in-the-way-of-your-seo-google-says-322909 On the contrary, modifying the headings as requested could be ...


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There are five characters that should be escaped as entities in HTML documents, no matter which character set your website uses: < as &lt; > as &gt; & as &amp; " as &quot; ' as &#39; Other special characters always can be escaped with entities, but only need to be if you are using a character set that doesn't contain them....


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Thus, instead of displaying >, the article displays >. This occurs (for me, at least) on Chrome, Firefox, and Safari (all latest versions with cache cleared). That is probably a software error where > was turned into &gt; then that was turned into &amp;gt; by some kind of duplicate encoding. You can use "Control-U" to view the ...


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HTML elements strong and em are the semantic elements of the current HTML5 standard. Check the description that this standard gives for the strong element: The strong element represents strong importance, seriousness, or urgency for its contents. and for the em element: The em element represents stress emphasis of its contents. In turn, HTML elements b ...


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Short answer, probably not Matt Cutts of Google has said that strong and b originally had no affect on your SEO and that his opinion is that of 2013, they still didn't. Matt Cutts and <b> vs <strong> When to use <b> vs <strong> According to SEO Ability you should always use strong for text you want to emphasize content, but use <b&...


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Structured data offers different possibilities to make your content better machine-readable. But it is not a tool or method to gain the content spreading. To do so you should run usual content marketing campaigns, connect your business with press release aggregators, multiplicators and influencers in your vertical and so on. Don't run into delusion, some ...


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NO. This misses the point of SEO. By breaking up linguistic data across multiple "environments", the information is artificially "out of context" for Google's algorithms and presents difficulties for interpretation and categorization. In the "big picture" Google wants your content to be useful for people, so context is important....


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