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When considering SEO, you should keep User Experience top of mind. In this case, the mark-up itself won't have a huge impact on SEO, but it could on user experience which often indirectly translates to better rankings over time. If your styling makes it difficult or abrasive for users to read the linked text, then you would want to avoid linking the entire ...


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The First is more specific and accurate, even though there is not a big difference between both, in SEO right now (I doubt it though), I think it's safer to look for what search engines developers are trying to achieve, and try and do that. Because the tools change constantly but the aim is the same: link what users search for, to the most relevant content. ...


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For SEO, this really does not matter. Sure, you want relevant anchor text for your links, but if your anchor text is a monster, it'll be overkill. This is one of those cases where you have to think about the user, and about accessibility. Imagine a person who can't see your copy, using a screen reader. The screen reader will read each section in turn, down ...


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It is better to enclose a relevant keyword or phrase in <a></a> tag that leads to the destination page than wrap more than one elements like <h3> and <p>. If the page is like a category page where there are list of articles, you may wrap the heading, read more separately.


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I found a way that seems to work 100%: Use the old app MS Front Page Go to "Design Mode" (lower left corner on a blank page) Paste text copied from MS Word Switch to "Code Mode" and you will have clean HTML code You can save it from there as HTML if needed


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Google works correctly. If I search for "ampersand in title" I can find several results such as this one that show an unescaped ampersand in the Google search results while I having an escaped ampersand in their HTML source code. <title>A Guide to the Ampersand (&amp;) | Proofed’s Writing Tips</title> Your site has an HTML entity ...


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