New answers tagged

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You can test your twitter card configuration using the following aplication https://cards-dev.twitter.com/validator


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This is likely due to the low quality and square aspect ratio of your twitter image: https://fireflysemantics.github.io/logo/service-parts-help-center/fs-logo-help-center.png Twitter renders the card when the image is twice as wide as tall or 16:9 ratio. A square image should not be used. A two color image is not high quality. Most twitter cards contain ...


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Background videos have no direct impact on SEO. Google doesn't penalize for background video any more than it does for images. This is all down to the implementation details. Will the video delay the load of the usable elements of the page? Does the video make it harder to use the rest of the page? If the page renders and becomes usable quickly while the ...


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So does it actually impact my SEO if I would change from client-side rendering to server-side rendering? No - Just make sure that Google can crawl can render the content that you are serving - test it using GSC inspect URL or https://search.google.com/test/rich-results, look s the JS loading issues and source code to make sure the content is visible.


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I don't see anything wrong with Hreflang annotation, it could be the tools that is causing an issue, however, I never used this tool. Its worth to test is GSC to see if it does return any issues.


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It's best to split the sitemap by your website structure, example category pages, product pages, blog, etc, this way you can easily debug it if anything goes wrong. Limit a single sitemap to 50MB (uncompressed) and 50,000 URLs. If you have a larger file or more URLs, you will have to break your list into multiple sitemaps. Make sure there isn't any duplicate ...


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If you can remove the empty H1 is better, but nothing to worry as google pick the overall intent of the content.


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Google will typically ignore empty header tags. Google has also confirmed or has been cited as saying that using multiple header tags or H1s is completely fine and will not impact, help or hurt, how you rank. https://www.searchenginejournal.com/google-h1-headings-seo/328459/#close


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As long as one tag is empty you will only have one h1 tag and this is fine. 2 h1 tags will only confuse the search engines. But the title is the title and h1 is h1. So don't use h1 as page title, for title use title tag.


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In order to avoid the duplicated content, you can use the canonical url. In the page for /es-es/zapatos you would add a canonical link to /es/zapatos Example for the page href="http://example.com/es-es/zapato" <head> <title>Wha efa</title> ... <link rel="alternate" hreflang="es" href="http://...


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In fact, google indexes all the urls or url-like text contained in a piece of code. When you publish the web, try to access with lynks (or other console text based browser) and see as spider views.


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There are not ccTLP content restrictions. You can put, for example, english content inside an .es (Spain) ccTLP. In my opinion using a country to target an specific language audience is an error, because the language is above the countries. Try to use an generic TLP like, com, net, org or the new ones as online, site, etc ...


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Old question but must be answered completely. It's very disappointing that it has not been answered in almost a year! Those images come from either your: Twitter card image or Facebook opengraph image I am not 100% from which one, but I am 100% it is from one of the two, or at least the first image that Google finds while reading your page. So keep this in ...


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The only fields that are useful to include in your sitemap are the <loc> and <xhtml:link rel="alternate" hreflang="en">. You can omit the <lastmod>, <priority> and other fields. Google doesn't use them. Google's Gary Illyes (methode) says: The lastmod tag is optional in sitmaps and in most of the cases it's ...


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Boostrap, Foundation, and W3C all don't use literal quotes. I'd say leave them out.


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The list you've outlined looks complete to me, not sure what exactly you're looking for. According to W3, the following elements can go inside the <head>: <title> (required in every HTML document) <style> <base> <link> <meta> <script> <noscript> The only thing that's missing from your list that's related to ...


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In terms of SEO, this should make no difference whatsoever. Search engines rank content based on many factors, but whether the content is wrapped in quotes is not something that matters.


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If the goal is to improve your own website's SEO, copying another website's content probably won't help even if you have permission from them to do so. There isn't any magic that a canonical tag (on your site at least) can do about that. Google tries best to only index one copy of each article it finds on the internet, and it's very likely to index the ...


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I highly doubt that the CNAME is the only reference to example.cloudhost.com. There are many ways that URLs leak. See Can a URL that is not linked to from anywhere be discovered? for a more complete list but it includes: Emails with the link sent through Gmail Third party JS used on your site, especially analytics or ads which send data to Google External ...


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As a rule of thumb, never nofollow internal links. Matt Cutts, Google Search engineer, said that he doesn't use nofollow on his website's category or archive pages, which are similarly dynamically generated like your related videos section is. If one of the guys who ran Google Search didn't bother with it on his website, neither should you.


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Doing a site:salon-live.website search shows that what Google has currently indexed is sub optimal. Like the title is "React App". You're latest version of the page is a little better. I'd do a Url Inspection in the Google Search Console and then a Request Indexing. Hopefully that would speed up re-indexing so that Google sees your new title. meta ...


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This is totally fine from an SEO standpoint. You're telling the crawlers not to index these "No Index" pages, so that's just what they'll do. Ideally you would configure the server to return a "403 Forbidden" status code so that non-search crawlers get the idea too, but in practice it probably does not really matter.


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Your question is on a very broad subject so you won't get an actual 100% working answer for it but can chime in with some suggestions. What you have is a scenario and only you know that scenario because you haven't mentioned the keywords and other info (You shouldn't as we don't want that getting crawled here) therefore everything that I say will be just my ...


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Googlebot does not interact with the page like a user. It does not click on anything. It does not scroll. If content is loaded into the page when users click, Google is not going to index it as part of that page. However, Googlebot still may find AJAX content to which users have to click. That is because Googlebot scans the page source, the rendered ...


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Well, in my opinion and experience, internal linking may be google ranking factor. So, too many internal linking to low quality pages from top ranking pages somewhat may harm google ranking. The number of links may be different upon the scale of sites. How many pages does your site have?


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Once again I find myself repeating the same words "No one knows how the Google Algo actually works" but after that being said... I don't think internal linking will affect the rankings that much. Just don't go overboard with the internal linking and try to link to pages that also have a chance to rank better. i.e. don't do internal linking to low ...


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It depends on your call to action/moneymaker. Sometimes people have mostly mobile traffic, but eventually those mobile users complete an important form from their desktop (cross device), making that desktop traffic small but important. But if no desktop traffic is very important and causes you headaches to maintain that site, it makes sense to ditch it.


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Technology changes fast and I am not saying that desktops will be the thing of the future but don't forget tablets and don't forget other devices which could use slightly bigger resolutions. If time permits then instead of spending time in managing 2 versions I would say code out a responsive design of the same site. It can be done easily with media queries ...


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I wouldn't bother with it as of now. It should be able to take care of itself. The key here is the ?m=202005 it is query string and usually this will be dropped in sometime. If after some days you see any negative effect of it then just stop that feature (If you have rights to do that) otherwise in end you have option open to remove that link from there. But ...


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Describing the image yourself would be much better from SEO point of view. Article title always won't be matching the image contents. It would be manual work to describe the image and use that image name or alt tags but that is worth it. Don't forget that you can easily target Google Image search as a traffic source if your image appears in that search ...


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As long as all of the '/foopage.php' pages have 301 redirects to their new slugs '/foopage', and the domain name is the same, then: yes.


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What you are describing is what Google calls doorway pages. Having doorway pages can get your entire site (including your original domain) penalized and removed from the search results. Google doesn't like it when you copy pages, change a few keywords (like the location), and try to rank for all of them. Using multiple domains is not a good ranking ...


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Google should be removing the development site from its index. I'm surprised that is taking months. The only ways that it should take that long are if: You have thousands of pages. Google does have to crawl each page to realize it is gone. If you have a large number of pages, it may take Googlebot months to get back to each and every page. /robots.txt ...


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Google doesn't care much about what tags you use these days. Historically Google put extra weight on words in header tags because Googlebot only looked at the source code of the page and could pick those tags out. Today Googlebot renders pages to see what words are prominent on the page. I wouldn't try to include h1, h2, and h3 tags just for SEO. I'd ...


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Images can rank in search engines, but it is easier to rank paragraphs of text. There are several reasons: Search engines ignore pages that don't have much content on them. Search engine bots can identify text as content reliably. Images are much harder for them to interpret. It is much harder for a bot to know how much content is in an image. It is ...


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Here are the minimum requirements for Google to be able to Crawl your video: Minimum requirements for a video search result: If you want your video to be eligible for search results: Google must be able to find the video. Videos are identified in the page by the presence of an HTML tag, for example: <video>, <embed>, or <object>. Ensure ...


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Just a little update here, because Google has changed their policy and in consequence only https page will be taking into account.


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I want to redirect all traffic reaching example.com to example.app (i.e. the .com is a pure redirect). Does that have any impact on SEO? It means that any links to the .com will pass some link juice to the .app domain, though less than if the .app domain were linked directly. I am fairly certain that there are no other SEO implications. So, fairly useless ...


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Google dropped support for news_keywords year before last. So now, it neither helps nor hurts SEO, no matter whether your website is a news site or not: Hi Joost, it looks like we dropped support for this around the time when we removed it from the help center. Keeping it on pages is fine, we just don't use it for Google News anymore. (@JohnMu) February 20, ...


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We are thinking about including the [+] and [-] buttons on the AMP page as links to the non-AMP version with a GET param in order to show the calculation result on the non-AMP page. These GET parameters create an "infinite space" (there are in practice an "infinite" number of pages, one for every number in the GET param). So you would be ...


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Google has often said that proper HTML formatting and semantic tagging is important in how they understand content on a page. They often use this in order to extract and understand the important parts of a page. headings tags like H1s and H2s are still important. Google goes to great length to identify which parts of the page are "primary" content ...


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The answer depends. Is it a good idea? well that depends on the percentage of your users that are mobile. If a 100% of your website users are on mobile devices, then yes, forbidding your desktop site is probably not going to make much of a difference. It terms of SEO rankings. Google primarily crawls with a mobile user-agent/bot, so having a purely mobile ...


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Its absolutely fine to markup multiple products on a single page. Use Google's Structured Data Testing Tool to see if your schema markup validates.


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Hmm, interesting. I guess first thing first. Google will generally not crawl a link that has a rel=nofollow. If you later change the link to dofollow then google will take it into consideration i.e. pagerank and the link graph. I don't believe removing or adding nofollow to links is seen as "manipulative" by Google. This is done pretty regularly ...


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If you're asking if there is a difference in how google treats urls with forward slashes vs. without then no, there isn't much of a difference. You just have to make sure that you always reference a single, "canonical" version of the URL.


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Google only indexes images that have direct URLs, so images that are dynamically generated on a page (svg or otherwise) would not be eligible to appear in results. They do not index data-URI images for image search. I would consider rendering them server-side using something like NodeJS, or writing a script that will generate the directory of all 20,000 in ...


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As of September 10, 2019, Google announced to start treating rel=nofollow as 'hint' which means in some cases it may decide to count it or may also use it as an advantage to rank some sites. Read more here.


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Been a web dev for 23 years and have had all sorts of high- and low-ranking websites. The stuff in common for the high-ranking ones is: Unique and useful content Fast load time Went straight to the point / no bs / nothing annoying


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To answer your question, no it is not possible without violating Google's guidelines. According to Google's structured data guidelines: Don't mark up content that is not visible to readers of the page. So adding extra FAQs to structured data, if they are not visible on the page, is a violation and is likely to get your structured data ignored. I imagine ...


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It is always better to use the canonical URLs in links whenever possible. If you don't use canonical URLs in your internal linking: Users won't see the canonical URLs when navigating your site Users will create external links to your non-canonical URLs Search engine bots will see both your canonical and non-canonical URLs causing twice as much crawling ...


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