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2

What you are describing is the expected click-through rate (CTR) for each ranking position - in other words, what percentage of clicks each position gets. This can vary greatly according to the intent behind the search (commercial vs informational, for example), the device (mobile vs desktop) and many other factors but as a starting point, the desktop ...


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The biggest exception to "no duplicate content" is for nearly identical sites targeted at different countries. Google specifically allows copies of your site for this purpose and won't penalize the duplicates. Google can index each and every copy and show them in the search results to users from the correct countries. See Geotargeting: Managing multi-...


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Both. If you add NOINDEX to some articles, they won't help you with SEO because they won't be seen by search engines. If most of your articles are not seen by search engines, then your website is missing opportunities to rank and bring organic traffic. If your question is if adding NOINDEX to some articles will hurt the rankings of the other articles or ...


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What you need to implement is HREFLANG tags, which are a special type of canonicals created specifically to deal with having duplicate content in different languages. This guide from Google is a good way to learn more about HREFLANG and should teach you the basics but pay attention because it can get very confusing, very fast.


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Headings (H1, H2, etc) play no part in ranking a website and having duplicate ones won't get you penalized - Google uses them to understand the content and how it is organized in the page, so having unique headings means it's an opportunity to make your content clearer to Google, which in turn can help you (but again, it won't get you penalized). On your ...


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Using a 301 redirect for this is indeed the correct way to do. Should you "move" your EN site from example.com to example.com/EN? Probably not - there's nothing to gain from doing this, it's perfectly fine to have the main language in your main domain (not only that but people probably expect to).


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This is a known "bug"; even Google mentions that if you get one of these where no actual file is referenced, you should just request a review and ignore it (my website gets one of these every few months, just a small annoyance but no real harm). Source


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I think there are two separate issues here: usability and SEO. For usability, yes, you should redirect as you suggested, it's a good idea behavior. For SEO/Google, you definitely need to implement the correct HREFLANG tags in every page that has a localized version. This means that if you have 4 different homepages, you need to add <link rel="...


1

The solution you are looking for is using a canonical tag to signal Google which of the pages you want INDEXED and shown on Google. A canonical tag transfers the "SEO" value of a URL to a different one but it keeps both online and accessible; a redirect (such as a 301) replaces one with the other. What you want is to add a canonical tag in the example.com/...


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A canonical is one of the signals that Google uses to decides which page to index and show on the SERPs; because of that, they can decide to ignore it if the other signals point to another page that appears to be a better match. The signals they use for this: Link rel canonical annotation that matches throughout the site Redirects Internal linking using ...


1

A canonical is one of the signals that Google uses to decides which page to index and show on the SERPs; because of that, they can decide to ignore it if the other signals point to another page that appears to be a better match. The signals they use for this: Link rel canonical annotation that matches throughout the site Redirects Internal linking using ...


0

As most answers already said here, I wouldn't recommend doing this, but one way to do would be to set up a 301 redirect to your "main" language (https://example.com/en for example). Every website needs a default page, so you should choose one and then redirect to it.


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I would say this depends on what is going on the website along with your ability to implement the solution, also whether you have subdomains. Gauging by your question, you seem to have the ability to do any of the solutions. Your websites content. I would suggest using a paid SSL if you are an e-commerce site or is a multi-site. Mainly due to the warranty ...


0

Google can't see some JavaScript links, so you need to be careful. Which links does Google index? <a href=”/good-link”>Will be crawled</a> This is a regular a href link that will be crawled by Google. <span onclick=”changePage(‘bad-link’)”>Not crawled</span> Google will not crawl this link because it is not an anchor. <a ...


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No, it won't hurt your website. Just make sure your links are natural (i.e. they belong in the content) and try to use natural-looking anchor text and you'll be fine - this is an internal link and Google knows this is the correct usage for them.


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What do you mean by " allow access to the .csv"? If you host the file publicly to your server, Google can find it and index it without any issues. That being said, there are ways for you to make sure they find it, such as linking to this .csv file from withing a page or submitting it using an XML sitemap. Do a search on Google for: filetype:csv sunburst ...


1

Unless you got a manual penalty from Google, these links are not the reason for your traffic drop - Google is very good at ignoring SPAM links like these, so in most cases, you can completely ignore it You only need to disavow them if a big percentage of your links are from these SPAM websites, or if you start getting many of these every month.


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No, it won't. Google knows that this kind of issue happens and they can read the content of the page visually too, so you shouldn't have any problem.


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So, creating 15 collection pages on a single page is a very bad practice. A simple WebPage scheme is just enough.


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According to the dev docs for structured data Structured data is coded using in-page markup on the page that the information applies to. The structured data on the page should describe the content of that page. You should not create blank or empty pages just to hold structured data; nor should you add structured data about information that is ...


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So, is a redirect to another page with 410 code fine? A redirect is not necessary. Define a custom 410 error document: ErrorDocument 410 /error-docs/e410.php And trigger the 410 in .htaccess, as you did before: RewriteRule ^deleted/ - [G] The G flag is simply a shortcut for R=410 and the L flag is not required (it is implied when using a status code ...


1

With that logic you could have children's stories and many innocent sites being flagged as "bad". No, it doesn't work like that. Context is everything. But, from the other standpoint... just because a site's subject matter is in that "bad" realm isn't necessarily a reason to reduce it's ranking (with some obvious exceptions). Aside: "we don't publish ...


2

I've been apprised that the DNS entries above won't work because you can't CNAME a naked domain to a subdomain. Is that correct? Yes, as stated in comments, you can't create a CNAME record on the domain apex, ie. example.com. Trying to do so can cause problems later. You would typically do this the other way round. For example: example.com. A 14400 ...


1

I am considering stripping down or gutting this product page however it takes to stop this from happening. I would refrain from "gutting this product page" as this might only harm ranking. It is, after all, this page that has "amassed the heavy backlinks". If you "gut" this page too much then these backlinks become irrelevant. I would just make sure that ...


1

Make sure you 301 redirect your .in pages to the new ones on .com. .com is considered a general domain which could be associated with any region. You can control this in Google Search Console under the legacy tool of "international targeting" then the Country tab. Opinion is that there is no real negative global impact on targeting a country.


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It is perfectly fine to do what you propose, as long as you do not do any domain masking. Here's a short yt video explanation.


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There are several ways to skin a cat. The cleanest solution if you have already been indexed to to send signals to get those URLs removed from the index. e.g. 404, 410 or a noindex meta tag. Once the GSC is reporting all URLs as excluded and not indexed, you can do a stronger block. e.g. disallow in robots.txt or even restrict access to the whole site in ...


2

Disallow: / will prevent robots from crawling your entire site. Robots.txt rules are "starts with" rules. Google and other search engines allow some extensions to robots.txt rules such as wild cards and ends with operators. For the robots (including Google) that follow those extensions you could use: User-agent: * Disallow: /$ Most robots will still ...


2

I will allow myself to give an answer from the point of view of Google because I know a little with their documentation. Duplicate content (regardless of location - in the metadata or in the main content of the web page) has the following negative result. The presence of duplicate content of the website does not allow Google to determine the relevant ...


0

Google specifically allows duplicate content when targeting the same site to different countries. Creating subdomains for each country and changing the currency, pricing, and taxes will help your SEO, not hurt it. You just need to make sure you tell Google about this targeting. You can either use HTML tags, HTTP headers, or sitemaps to do so. The link ...


1

For SEO it is best to only ever use one language per page. Google's John Mueller said: In general, we recommend sticking to a single language per page. If you have multi-lingual content on your website, I'd recommend using separate pages per language. Our language recognition tries to find the most relevant language from your content, so that we can send ...


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Let's say 'Bulb page' with 'White bulb' as a product, 'Yellow bulb' as another product and so on. White bulb and Yellow bulb are more specific values for the product such as Bulb. You can use the property color of the type Product to mark up more detailed product information. Also, this type has the following properties which are for marking up more ...


2

To allow a more specific URL you can use the Allow directive (supported by all major search engine bots). For example: User-agent: * Allow: /v6.0/i-want-this-page-indexable Disallow: /v6.0 Disallow: /v5.8 Disallow: /v5.7 Disallow: /v5.5 Disallow: /v5.1 Disallow: /v5.0 The order of these directives doesn't strictly matter for most search engine bots (...


1

Don't overthink it. Your blog pages (articles) should be linked on: Main blog page (index, follow) Blog category page (noindex, follow) Blog tag page (noindex, follow) PHP website pages, where they match the content (index, follow) You see, despite some pages are noindex, all of them are follow - this is because even pages not worth for index are crawled ...


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The topic of duplicate content has changed over the years. Here is one older question: What is duplicate content and how can I avoid being penalized for it on my site?. I have written some examples of how Google determines duplicate content, however, I could not find it quickly. Trust me, it would quickly put you at ease. The up-shot is this. Google knows ...


2

When a canonical tag is used, you are saying that the page specified in the canonical tag is preferred. So if one page's canonical tag points to another page, only the preferred page is shown in the search index. This is by design. Google will only show the preferred page in the SERPs. Any exception to the rule is only temporary as Google processes what it ...


3

There is a risk with URL changes of SEO problems, ranking loss, and traffic declines. When correctly implemented with 301 redirects, it can go perfectly fine, but it doesn't always do so. I recommend changing URLs only when there is an overwhelming need. If you do want to change URLs you should consider gentler changes as well: Chang the URL structure ...


1

It seems you have/had a WordPress on your server and Google is indexing it. Perhaps you could redirect all those pages to your homepage to make it easyer for Google to understand and more user friendly if someone find one of those results in a search. If on apache server, you could add this directive to .htaccess file at the root of your website. ...


4

If you correctly put in 301 redirects and update your sitemap, the site will be fine. However... What are you trying to gain from this change? The Stack Exchange-style hierarchy doesn't make sense for what it seems you're trying to accomplish (a Wikipedia-style website?). What you currently have makes more sense in terms of organizing the information: ...


3

While you won't see any changes to your SERP positions or indexing regardless of which path you take here, you're doing the right thing by having internal links open in the same tab. (As @closetnoc pointed out above, including the attribute at all is a bit redundant, since the default behavior of links is to open in the same tab, unless otherwise specified.) ...


4

No. Google would not take the right to do that (I don't think any browser has done such). Also many "hidden" pages would anyway not be accessible; i.e. I may have many pages on my computers that are 100% private; also many websites have pages that are not accessible unless you first create an account and log in. However, would Google be able to eventually ...


0

Since it's only temporary, you should use 302 redirect instead of 301. But my advice is don't use auto-redirect, but inform the visitor in existing/old website to try a new platform with a popup every visitor visit it or something else. My worry is that all new content will be indexed against a subdomain Why are you worrying about it? I don't see any ...


1

Frankly, it mostly doesn't matter what you use as a separator. Literature on this is scant, though I think this is a good article. Just don't use any crazy characters, as results may display in unexpected ways and might even look spammy. (More on that in this thread from this very forum.) Of the three options you listed, I don't see > much, and I've ...


1

Although you and your team are building the site, the client is buying it, which means if you want to put any sort of credit on their website (even Schema code) you really should ask their permission. As Stephen mentioned it's unlikely that this data will be used for anything, so it would probably be better to instead ask the client if they would mind being ...


1

John Mueller recently had a lot to say about how Heading affect SEO: I think in general, headings are a bit overrated in the sense that it’s very easy to… get pulled into lots of theoretical discussions on what the optimal headings should be. We do use headings when it comes to search. But we use them to better understand the content on the ...


0

As the content of the page is user-specific, it would likely be always blank for spiders (which probably won't trigger the conditions required to have anything other than the blank version of the page). Ergo, you're probably better blocking spiders from accessing the page entirely. Just add the following to your robots.txt file. Disallow: /?read-it-later ...


2

It isn't clear what the "General HTTP error" is from the screenshot you posted. I can access your site, robots.txt, and sitemap myself. To resolve that problem you should: Click on "1 instance" and try to see what specific error Googlebot is getting. Use "inspect URL" in Google Search Console with a live test to try and reproduce the problem Examine your ...


0

I think you are asking the wrong question and a redirect isn't the correct solution in your case. It might be better to use Dynamic Rendering for your use case in which something like a dashboard that is dynamically generated is rendered statically for the user-agent of googlebot and others bots of their ilk. Basically, serve the public, non-specific ...


1

As has already been stated, treating Googlebot differently to normal users and redirecting Googlebot only is generally not a good idea. An alternative approach is to: Redirect all users/bots from /app to /dashboard (the new "app") But include a link back to the old "app" from /dashboard that is not redirected. eg. /app?noredirect=1 that allows users to ...


-1

You just need to redirect googlebot PHP for exp if(strstr(strtolower($_SERVER['HTTP_USER_AGENT']), "googlebot")) { // redirect } For nginx exp if ($http_user_agent ~ (googlebot) ) { return otherdomaine.com; }


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