Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.

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1

Although, not a primary ranking factor, we would recommend that you clean them up so there are no 404s or missing pages. If an auditing software can detect these errors, then you can bet that Google can, too.


1

I'd disagree that this would be of no concern. Your biggest concern I'd imagine is going to be your mobile experience. Say one image is linked but another is not (I'm sure neither are but stay with me), in this case a crawler (or user) gets to the page can't click on one image versus the other. In GSC you may see that you're getting a warning for images ...


2

Alt text should be written as if it were describing the significant parts of the image to a blind person. So yes, three images can all have the same alt text, but only if all three images are identical. If the images aren't identical, the alt texts should include a description of their differences. Someone using the thee example alt texts (from another ...


4

There can be more than one path here, and it depends on a couple of factors: Do you want all the images to be competitive in image search, or are you okay with only your main product image being competitive? Are those zoomed-in images crucial for individuals with accessibility challenges, or is it okay if screen readers and other such technologies skip over ...


3

You shouldn't use the Google Search Console inspect URL feature for image URLs. It is only for web pages that can be indexed in web search. See this Tweet by Google's John Mueller The Inspect URL tool is only useful for webpages, so if you inspect images, CSS, JS, etc -- then the results there wouldn't be as useful (they'd reflect how we would index it ...


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