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3

It is already answered in Stackoverflow, you just need to define the useragent name there. Here we only specify Googlebot, so that rule is not applied to other search engines. user-agent: Googlebot Allow: /$ Disallow: / As Google said (at the end of page). Use $ when you want to Match URLs that end with a specific string. Here /$ will say allowed to index ...


2

if ($_SERVER['HTTP_CACHE_CONTROL'] == 'no-cache') { Also bear in mind that the Cache-Control HTTP request header (as with most request headers) are entirely optional, so may not be present as part of the request at all. (This line would then generate an E_NOTICE under these conditions.) In fact, I don't believe Googlebot sends the Cache-Control header when ...


1

Based on the link you provide. Are you being deceptive? Meaning are you hiding the parent element in order to achieve keyword stuffing of some sort? This is really bad and I would't do it. You aren't being deceptive but again some text (that might contain keywords) is being hidden along with the parent element? This is bad and I would't risk it. Do you ...


0

You refer to the two stage crawling of Googlebot that has been problematic for getting JS powered websites indexed in a timely fashion. The good news is that Google says that the render stage usually takes place within seconds and rarely more than minutes after then initial crawl. Reference: Google Says The Median Time For GoogleBot To Render Is 5 Seconds ...


2

What is a crucial at the upgrade you are making is to make sure that your structure remains the same and when not possible use 301 redirects from your current pages to the new ones. Doing that should not affect your page's rankings. Avoid 404s at all cost. That being said, the difference of the two-wave crawling and indexing is the speed. If your site's ...


2

It is always better to have proper 404 responses. However, search engines can deal with both JS redirects to 404 pages and blank pages. They should treat them the same as a proper 404 error. There is a long history of web servers redirecting to error pages rather than showing a proper error status directly. Search engine bots have to be programmed to ...


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You should remove all your <lastmod>, <changefreq>, and <priority> data from your sitemaps. Google says they don't use it. It is just extra bloat making your sitemap files larger with no benefit to you. In fact, sitemaps have almost no SEO benefit. See The Sitemap Paradox. Google will crawl pages listed only in a sitemap, but it ...


2

I found the solution from these links: https://stackoverflow.com/a/19100808/3247491 https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/aspnet/web-api/overview/security/enabling-cross-origin-requests-in-web-api#enable-cors First I removed these codes from web.config: <httpProtocol> <customHeaders> <add name="Access-Control-Allow-Origin" value="*" ...


2

If your sitemap is being submitted in txt format, then it must have a .txt file extension. https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/183668?hl=en


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