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1

Can I create a keyword subdirectory for my home page to help SEO? You could, however, this may not help much with SEO. The URL doesn't necessarily help that much with ranking (on page content is what really matters), although it could perhaps help click through rates when users see the URL/keyword in search results. I suspect this requires some ...


2

As stated by Stephen, you should rather set a 410 Gone redirection, like this: # /.htaccess: Redirect 410 /pl/index/12 Redirect 410 /pl/index/16 Redirect 410 /pl/index/18 # And so on. Or, if you can identify a pattern in the paths that have to be redirected, you can use the RedirectMatch directive, for example: # /.htaccess: # Of course, you **must** ...


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Cloudflare is a free solution for redirecting your alternate domains with HTTPS support. Here are detailed instructions for setting it up: Visit Cloudflare Create an account and verify your email address Use the "add a site" feature to add your alternate domain under their free plan. If you are creating an account, it should ask you to do this as a step ...


1

Google is just telling you that it doesn't add redirects to its index. This is fine and normal. Continue to redirect to the trailing slash version, which is the version that Google will index.


3

Google allows the robots.txt 301 redirection you're talking about: Google follows at least five redirect hops as defined by RFC 1945 for HTTP/1.0 and then stops and treats it as a 404. https://developers.google.com/search/reference/robots_txt I couldn't find any information about Bing's crawler. It's my suspicion that smaller, poorly-written, non-...


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It will probably be fine for SEO to continue to link to your old URLs. However, you should start converting all the links on your site to the new URLs. Internally linking to URLs that redirect isn't best practice. It isn't very common. Users will make two requests instead of one for each link they click on your site. Similarly, search engine crawlers ...


0

This should do it: RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^page=[0-9]+$ RewriteRule ^/?(page/[0-9]+)$ /$1? [R=301,L] When the query string has a page number in it like page=34 and the path is also a page number like /page/23, then redirect to remove the query string. [0-9]+ is one or more digits, ie a number ^ and $ are "starts with" and "ends with" respectively, ...


4

It is always a good idea to "test" with 302 (temporary) redirects in order to avoid the caching of erroneous redirects - as you have stated. Ordinarily "testing" is just a matter of running your own tests in development before going live. tl;dr I don't see any problem in going live with a 302 in this instance and changing to 301 later. The "only" duplicate ...


0

First ans second are the same, canonical act as a redirection. So that part is normal. For the last try, maybe the original page receive lot's of backlink and that's why it doesn't lost ranking. When you perform an seo migration you should avoid url changing. So my suggest is you move the new version content on the old url (if there are still ranking best) ...


1

I suggest you translate on english this article i wrote, it describe the full process of successfull seo migration. https://www.410-gone.fr/seo/optimisation-on-site/migration-https-certificat-ssl/refonte-site-redirection.html


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