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Doing a site:salon-live.website search shows that what Google has currently indexed is sub optimal. Like the title is "React App". You're latest version of the page is a little better. I'd do a Url Inspection in the Google Search Console and then a Request Indexing. Hopefully that would speed up re-indexing so that Google sees your new title. meta ...


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You can create a custom report to get this information. Go to "Customization". Select "Custom Report". Title your report "Users by hostname". Add the Metric Group "Users" (I also added "Sessions" and "Pageviews" to my report). Add the Dimension Drilldown of "Hostname". Save your custom ...


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It depends on your call to action/moneymaker. Sometimes people have mostly mobile traffic, but eventually those mobile users complete an important form from their desktop (cross device), making that desktop traffic small but important. But if no desktop traffic is very important and causes you headaches to maintain that site, it makes sense to ditch it.


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Technology changes fast and I am not saying that desktops will be the thing of the future but don't forget tablets and don't forget other devices which could use slightly bigger resolutions. If time permits then instead of spending time in managing 2 versions I would say code out a responsive design of the same site. It can be done easily with media queries ...


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I wouldn't bother with it as of now. It should be able to take care of itself. The key here is the ?m=202005 it is query string and usually this will be dropped in sometime. If after some days you see any negative effect of it then just stop that feature (If you have rights to do that) otherwise in end you have option open to remove that link from there. But ...


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As the other two mentioned, you probably want to consider using 301 to drive the juice to your new site if you do not want to keep the old site. It is also possible to change the canonical URL. In the old site you add that entry to your headers that need to point to the new site. Either way, if your pages have completely new URL paths, it's not going to be ...


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If you are migrating domain names, do not remove your old domain's content from the Google index or you will see your rankings drop. Leave it be in Google's index, and implement proper 301 redirects. Also, use Google Search Console's Change of Address tool as potatomodem mentioned in his answer. "Content" does not "duplicate" on the new ...


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You've got 2 options: First you could log into Google Search Console > Settings > Change of Address and let Google know you're moving the domain. The important part will be ensuring your new domain has the right 301 redirects so the pages aren't 404. Second, log into Google Search Console > Removals > New Request, then place the URL of the page ...


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If you are fully deleting your site, it can be a one step process: Delete all files and the domain from the server. Googlebot and Bingbot will the pages from the search index the next time they crawl them and get an error. It could take a couple weeks for all the pages of your site to be removed from search engines, but it will happen. If you want to ...


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Yes, the three step plan you outlined would be the best way to completely remove a site from Google's index. Set all pages to contain a noindex tag either via the meta robots tag or the HTTP response header. However, keep in mind that this process may take a while depending on how large your website is and how often and deep google crawls your site. So if ...


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Just a little update here, because Google has changed their policy and in consequence only https page will be taking into account.


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This appears to be a bug/glitch on Google's end. Many sites have had this same issue (https://support.google.com/webmasters/thread/16282442). Google has also indicated that they may be deprecating the tool entirely soon, so this may be a sign that there is very little resources being dedicated to it.


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The answer depends. Is it a good idea? well that depends on the percentage of your users that are mobile. If a 100% of your website users are on mobile devices, then yes, forbidding your desktop site is probably not going to make much of a difference. It terms of SEO rankings. Google primarily crawls with a mobile user-agent/bot, so having a purely mobile ...


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This is a very common misconception actually. The indexing API only works for job postings or livestream videos. "Currently, the Indexing API can only be used to crawl pages with either JobPosting or BroadcastEvent embedded in a VideoObject. For websites with many short-lived pages like job postings or livestream videos, the Indexing API keeps content ...


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Hmm, interesting. I guess first thing first. Google will generally not crawl a link that has a rel=nofollow. If you later change the link to dofollow then google will take it into consideration i.e. pagerank and the link graph. I don't believe removing or adding nofollow to links is seen as "manipulative" by Google. This is done pretty regularly ...


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I suspect you are showing us the robots.txt file for the link that is blocked. robots.txt files vary per site. In this case https://static.doubleclick.net/robots.txt. doubleclick are themselves saying, don't crawl our site. That is fine as Googlebot is not interested in ads. Quite a few third party tracking systems will do the same. It's nothing to worry ...


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Thinking outside of the box you may be able to apply regex to your robots.txt file to disallow any variable parameters such as https://example.php/?p=x. You may be able to filter the question mark indicating a variable in your robots.txt with regex in the file itself. I actually just Googled this and although the robots.txt file does not allow regex it ...


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To expand on Stephen's answer not only will links to your site not hurt your seo, it will actually help. You can use Google webmaster tools to submit your site to Google for indexing but what really helps your seo in the end are organic links. It used to be that indexers relied on meta tags in your code but not anymore. The number one thing that will ...


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Those are sites that link to your site, not sites to which you link. If you click on the circled question mark, you can see Google's explanation: Links from outside your property to your property. Values are trimmed to root domain and grouped. If the current property is listed here, it is because the subdomain of the host page has been omitted. For example,...


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Yes, a 301 redirect would be the way to go about it. According to yoast, Use a 301 redirect to permanently redirect a URL to a new destination. This way, you tell both visitors and search engine crawlers that this URL changed and a new destination is found. This the most common redirect. Via - 6 questions about redirects for SEO | Yoast


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A page containing a large table is likely to cause layout shift as the columns may change size as more content is loaded. (Browsers typically start showing content before the HTML has fully downloaded.) The effect is probably not visible on mobile because the later columns are off-screen to the right so any layout changes don't shift anything around. ...


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First you have to identify any security or manual aActions in Google search console. If there is no issue listed there, that's ok. Second, you have to ensure that a 301 redirect from old domain to new domain is in place. Use a redirect checker to look into it.


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