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15

We talked about Alexa here on Webmasters a lot. Alexa is useless and relies on users using their toolbar. It has junk metrics and unreliable data. I advise you not to consider Alexa ranking in any terms. Still, I'm not sure why do people use it, it's total gibberish.


13

This is an easy one. Keyword density is a myth- sorta. At least it is now. What is important to note is how the terms are used and not how many times the terms are used. SEOs like to intentionally confuse the issue to keep you dependent upon them and paying for tools and advice. P.T. Barnum used to say that there is a sucker born every minute. In SEO, the ...


12

No. Google currently doesn't differentiate sites like that. You may see indirect effects (smartphone users liking your responsive site and recommending it to others), but we don't use that as a ranking factor. We are starting to use common configuration errors to adjust the rankings in smartphone search results though.


9

Short answer: Definitely no. Alexa a very bad representation of growth especially for small sites. We run a couple of sites and the numbers are way off especially when the traffic is low. Like the executives in your company, there are a lot of people who want easy metrics to gauge (as opposed to "correct metric") and hence the popularity of Alexa. Alexa ...


8

It probably will. I made my site responsive (using the same URL's, just different design) and I saw the number of incoming visits from Google on mobile devices rise by about 20%. Edit: seeing JohnMu's answer, this must have been because of the speed boost the new layout gave the site. Edit 2: It will be a ranking signal starting April 21st. http://...


8

Google is almost certainly using usability signals as a significant factor in the rankings. Google probably doesn't use "bounce rate", at least not as measured by Google Analytics. Instead, Google relies on: Click through rate (CTR) - The number of people that click from the SERPs to a site is a good indication of whether the site is relevant for the ...


8

The best course of action is to use canonical URLs. This avoids a situation where you are penalized for duplicate content. When it comes to desktop vs mobile websites, most sites will have something like this on their mobile website: Example for: http://m.mywebsite.com/page.html <link rel="canonical" href="http://mywebsite.com/page.html" /> The ...


8

Be careful! The cited link (http://moz.com/search-ranking-factors/survey) is a list of reported beliefs from SEOs. It often does not reflect reality, but rather how far afield our so-called SEO experts are while living in an echo-chamber of their own making. This yearly survey is evidence of the echo which is growing quite weary. It is no wonder why the ...


8

Google measures speed from the US. However, for SEO, Google doesn't actively penalize sites unless they are very slow. Unless your pages (without JS, CSS, and images) takes more than 7 seconds from the US, you have nothing to worry about. Google will notice if your users find your site slow. If your page isn't usable for your visitors in three seconds, ...


7

In my experience, mobile visitors want the same content as your desktop visitors do. I worked for a travel website with lots of information about hotels and restaurants. The site is generally known for hotels, but we thought that mobile users would be much more interested in restaurant content because they we looking for something when they were out. ...


7

Alexa rank is the worst representation of growth in terms of SEO Alexa rank is the best representation of the growth in usage of the Alexa toolbar. Your website's rank in Alexa is determined by the number of users browsing your website with the Alexa toolbar installed in their browser. When it comes to SEO, it means nothing.


6

No, you won't get better results simply from using Google Analytics and Google doesn't favour sites with Google Analytics over sites without it installed. Google Analytics is of course a great analytic tool and when the data is studied correctly, it can influence on your SEO efforts and thus can indirectly affect your SEO. (As could any other types of ...


6

When you are seeing that it takes Google 15 to 30 days to start sending traffic to a page, that is most likely because it is taking that long for Google to find and index content on your domain. As your domain gains trust, Google will find and index pages you post much more quickly. Google comes and re-crawls your site based on how many inbound links it ...


6

I'm seeing some evidence that Google likes text heavy pages even for simple queries right now. You might get better rankings with longer answers and filler text these days. One example is recipes. Pretty much any recipe I find on Google now has 3 pages of text before the actual recipe talking about how much Aunt Marge liked it at Thanksgiving four years ...


5

Google views "keyword stuffing" as using keywords ways that are not natural. Placing a list of keywords at the bottom of a page is certainly not natural. You wouldn't be doing that if you weren't trying to rank for those keywords. On the other hand, a small list (less than ten) of relevant keywords is unlikely to get you penalized, so your approach isn't ...


5

The main Google bot is visiting your site with a California IP address- there are some 'localized' versions but they do not always crawl your site with the same frequency/debt. Check google support site For this reason Blocking US ip's could be risky. You cannot simply allow access to the bot and block all other US traffic as that would be against Google ...


4

Yes, there is evidence. Matt Cutts has indicated that linking to quality pages can be a positive ranking factor. (source).


4

When you test your server perf in Page Speed Insights, if you're testing a responsive page, the result shows 2 different pages: for your computer view and for your mobile view. So, I guess that it will probably increase your PageRank, like this article says.


4

That URL returns a temporary 302 redirect to Googlebot to a URL on the website that checks the cookie stored to see if the user is logged in and whether to show premium content or not and for Googlebot where no cookie is stored, the full story is displayed and indexed in Google.


4

This is known as a paywall. Google has a program for news publishers called "first click free" - which allows for the blocked content to be crawled by Google, in most cases you also get to read the article for free if you access it via Google (with a 10 monthly article access - like NY Times for example). You can read more about it here: https://support....


4

After the transfer, what will most likely happen to our Google ranking? Nobody knows. You will be changing core elements of your website which are known to affect SEO (your HTML markup, site structure, URL structure) so your rankings will be influenced by this change. But there's no way to tell if this is for the better or not. If your rankings are very ...


4

Google places sites into the Google sites with various TLDs according to interest/performance and language. For example, there is not much need for Chinese language .cn sites in Google.com mostly because of the language. For this reason, many companies in China have begun registering and moving their sites to .com TLDs with English language sites to expand ...


4

Instead of just showing 1000 links all at once, you could introduce: a pagination feature - showing between 10 and 30 links per page, e.g. 50 pages of 20 links each, or 20 pages of 50 links each. For example: |< < Page 3 of 20 > >| a search box - enabling users to seach for a document using related keywords instead of scrolling through an ...


4

Not all Google search results require that the site is updated with fresh content. Google divides searches up into two buckets, one of which is "query deserves freshness" (QDF). QDF is for things like news and weather. If a site doesn't have up to date content, users are not going to be happy. Other queries (like your history example) are not going to ...


4

Google allows three different mobile configurations: Responsive web design Dynamic serving Separate URLs Although there are many advantages to responsive, Google allows any of the three. If Google is telling you that your site is not mobile friendly, separate m. URLs are a perfectly valid way to make it so. The short version of Google's guidance about ...


4

The way Google looks at this is whether the links you've added add up to the quality of the pages. It's a myth that linking out hurts, on the contrary, linking out to relevant authority sites helps improve your topical authority. Google sees this as an attempt to provide a better user experience. However, if you have 10 links or a hundred links going out ...


4

In short: it's very unlikely you'd see a negative SEO impact, but it still might not be a good idea. Google doesn't currently impose penalties, manual or algorithmic, for showing user details without authentication. The do punish "cloaking" (i.e. showing different content to Google than to a human user), but what you're proposing would not, in practice, be ...


4

When it comes to marketing agencies, there are some common KPI's that you see on proposals. Generally, they lean less toward technical SEO and more into the content territory; that means anything from keyword rankings to social media success. (Social media management is obviously a different beast than SEO, but lines blur a bit when we're talking digital ...


4

On using of automated traffic for SEO purposes you will 100% violate against Google terms of service. If you will be caught by Google on this, the penalty probability is very high. The technical aspects are following: to make any use for SEO purposes you should firstly start automatically a search query at google search page, than click automatically on ...


4

Yes, it is fine and even advisable to put block elements inside an a element where appropriate, as long as the browser supports HTML5 (all modern browsers do): The a element may be wrapped around entire paragraphs, lists, tables, and so forth, even entire sections, so long as there is no interactive content within (e.g. buttons or other links). Text-level ...


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