Hot answers tagged

27

Google doesn't put much (if any) ranking weight directly on the keywords that are in the URL right now. Any effects on SEO with or without them are caused indirectly through user interaction and usability. From a better usability standpoint: Keywords in URLs can increase the clickthrough rate (CTR) from the SERPs. Check out these two search results for "...


17

Here is some new advice from Google: Avoid these common mistakes Having no value proposition: Try not to assume that a site should rank #1 without knowing why it’s helpful to searchers (and better than the competition :) Segmented approach: Be wary of setting SEO-related goals without making sure they’re aligned with your company’s overall ...


15

We talked about Alexa here on Webmasters a lot. Alexa is useless and relies on users using their toolbar. It has junk metrics and unreliable data. I advise you not to consider Alexa ranking in any terms. Still, I'm not sure why do people use it, it's total gibberish.


14

No, it will not help. What you're doing is trying to serve up different content to Google then to your users. That's definitely against Google's terms of service and is a great way to get banned. There's nothing wrong with outbound links. If you don't want a site to get credit for the link to their site if you are concerned it is spam or otherwise low ...


12

No. Google currently doesn't differentiate sites like that. You may see indirect effects (smartphone users liking your responsive site and recommending it to others), but we don't use that as a ranking factor. We are starting to use common configuration errors to adjust the rankings in smartphone search results though.


12

This is an easy one. Keyword density is a myth- sorta. At least it is now. What is important to note is how the terms are used and not how many times the terms are used. SEOs like to intentionally confuse the issue to keep you dependent upon them and paying for tools and advice. P.T. Barnum used to say that there is a sucker born every minute. In SEO, the ...


9

Short answer: Definitely no. Alexa a very bad representation of growth especially for small sites. We run a couple of sites and the numbers are way off especially when the traffic is low. Like the executives in your company, there are a lot of people who want easy metrics to gauge (as opposed to "correct metric") and hence the popularity of Alexa. Alexa ...


8

There is no such thing as an SEO score. Whomever gave your site an SEO score made it up using criteria they deemed important. This in no way, shape, or form has any effect on nor is any indication of how well you will rank.


8

It probably will. I made my site responsive (using the same URL's, just different design) and I saw the number of incoming visits from Google on mobile devices rise by about 20%. Edit: seeing JohnMu's answer, this must have been because of the speed boost the new layout gave the site. Edit 2: It will be a ranking signal starting April 21st. http://...


8

The best course of action is to use canonical URLs. This avoids a situation where you are penalized for duplicate content. When it comes to desktop vs mobile websites, most sites will have something like this on their mobile website: Example for: http://m.mywebsite.com/page.html <link rel="canonical" href="http://mywebsite.com/page.html" /> The ...


8

Google measures speed from the US. However, for SEO, Google doesn't actively penalize sites unless they are very slow. Unless your pages (without JS, CSS, and images) takes more than 7 seconds from the US, you have nothing to worry about. Google will notice if your users find your site slow. If your page isn't usable for your visitors in three seconds, ...


7

Google is almost certainly using usability signals as a significant factor in the rankings. Google probably doesn't use "bounce rate", at least not as measured by Google Analytics. Instead, Google relies on: Click through rate (CTR) - The number of people that click from the SERPs to a site is a good indication of whether the site is relevant for the ...


7

In my experience, mobile visitors want the same content as your desktop visitors do. I worked for a travel website with lots of information about hotels and restaurants. The site is generally known for hotels, but we thought that mobile users would be much more interested in restaurant content because they we looking for something when they were out. ...


7

Be careful! The cited link (http://moz.com/search-ranking-factors/survey) is a list of reported beliefs from SEOs. It often does not reflect reality, but rather how far afield our so-called SEO experts are while living in an echo-chamber of their own making. This yearly survey is evidence of the echo which is growing quite weary. It is no wonder why the ...


7

Alexa rank is the worst representation of growth in terms of SEO Alexa rank is the best representation of the growth in usage of the Alexa toolbar. Your website's rank in Alexa is determined by the number of users browsing your website with the Alexa toolbar installed in their browser. When it comes to SEO, it means nothing.


6

If you want your site to be ranked higher, you need to know what factors (called rankings factors by the SEO folks) are used by Google to rank sites. A lot of research is continuously conducted to determine those factors, and to keep the info updated. For example, this table is updated all the time: The Periodic Table Of SEO Success Factors - http://...


6

That is because Alexa does not know how much traffic your website gets. They depend on users with their toolbar visiting website to get an idea of how much traffic to website gets. So the lesser trafficked site is getting more Alexa toolbar visitors then the other site. That's why you shouldnt be paying any attention to Alexa.


6

As long as the domain and content remains the same, changing IP addresses should have not affect on SEO. Moving from Canadian to US IP's wont affect your SEO. The only potential gotcha could be if somehow the IP address has been backlisted due to spam or other misuse, although this is more commonly, but not exclusively, an issue with Email than Web Domains. ...


6

No, you won't get better results simply from using Google Analytics and Google doesn't favour sites with Google Analytics over sites without it installed. Google Analytics is of course a great analytic tool and when the data is studied correctly, it can influence on your SEO efforts and thus can indirectly affect your SEO. (As could any other types of ...


6

When you are seeing that it takes Google 15 to 30 days to start sending traffic to a page, that is most likely because it is taking that long for Google to find and index content on your domain. As your domain gains trust, Google will find and index pages you post much more quickly. Google comes and re-crawls your site based on how many inbound links it ...


6

I'm seeing some evidence that Google likes text heavy pages even for simple queries right now. You might get better rankings with longer answers and filler text these days. One example is recipes. Pretty much any recipe I find on Google now has 3 pages of text before the actual recipe talking about how much Aunt Marge liked it at Thanksgiving four years ...


5

Yes, you can tell Google you're moving with the Change of Address functionality inside Webmaster tools. If you've moved your site to a new domain, you can use the Change of address tool to tell Google about your new URL. We'll update our index to reflect your new URL. Changes will stay in effect for 180 days, by which time we'll have crawled and ...


5

Yes, that is horrible keyword stuffing. Think about it from a searcher's perspective. Let's say they search for "Moscow Time" and land on your site. Initially they think "This is great, lots of world clocks, let me see which one is for Moscow". Unfortunately, you don't say which clock is for Moscow. In fact, you appear not to even show the correct clock ...


5

Google views "keyword stuffing" as using keywords ways that are not natural. Placing a list of keywords at the bottom of a page is certainly not natural. You wouldn't be doing that if you weren't trying to rank for those keywords. On the other hand, a small list (less than ten) of relevant keywords is unlikely to get you penalized, so your approach isn't ...


5

The main Google bot is visiting your site with a California IP address- there are some 'localized' versions but they do not always crawl your site with the same frequency/debt. Check google support site For this reason Blocking US ip's could be risky. You cannot simply allow access to the bot and block all other US traffic as that would be against Google ...


4

That article is incorrect in its assertion. It's not the fact that those blogs are on subdomains that causes them not to rank well. It's their low quality content. There are plenty of blogs on those sites that do rank well and it is because they have good content. FYI, having a domain name containing keywords would help those sites rank better but so would ...


4

It's a very bad idea for accessibility reasons as well. One commonly used feature of most screen readers is the ability to have a list of headings read out. This gives the users an overview of the document's structure and means they can jump between sections they want, rather than having to read through each section. In your example, the headings would ...


4

No. There is nothing to worry about. Crawlers come back regularly and will eventually index your new content once it is there. Domains can even be parked for years that way.


4

Yes, there is evidence. Matt Cutts has indicated that linking to quality pages can be a positive ranking factor. (source).


4

When you test your server perf in Page Speed Insights, if you're testing a responsive page, the result shows 2 different pages: for your computer view and for your mobile view. So, I guess that it will probably increase your PageRank, like this article says.


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