Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.

Hot answers tagged

19

It's important to start a URL with a / so that the intended URL is returned instead of its parent or child. Let's say if your browsing /cream-cakes/ then you have a link on the page that has blah.html without the forward slash it is going to attempt to visit page /cream-cakes/blah.html while with the forward slash it'll assume you mean the top level which ...


17

For what it's worth, I'll offer my own take on this. Hidden text alone is not deceptive. What you do with it is what determines whether it's deceptive. There are many scenarios in which hidden text is a good thing, both in terms of accessibility, functionality and just pure awesomeness. But there are also some setbacks, and times where hidden text may ...


15

Linking out to relevant sites is never a bad thing and may possibly help your rankings (source). The only time linking to another site may hurt you is when the site is considered by Google to be part of a bad neighborhood (sites that are created to crosslink themselves and boost their ranking or ranking of a main site). By linking to them you are ...


11

Technically, "#" is a well-defined URL reference that points to the start of the current document, so it is not “broken” in formal sense. It can, however, be regarded as bad for accessibility, and it is also a common symptom of “fake” links, i.e. a elements that are supposed to link to something external but depend on JavaScript. (In the very old days, <a ...


11

Does the leading '/' mean the path is starting from the site root? Technically this is referenced in section 4.2 of RFC 3986 as an "absolute-path reference": A relative reference that begins with a single slash character is termed an absolute-path reference. It ensures the path is absolute to the root directory and not the current directory (termed a ...


11

I agree with w3d’s answer, there should be no problem with Google Search or any other search engine. However, I suggest to make it visible anyway. Not for SEO, but for accessibility: Screen reader users are not the only users that can benefit from skiplinks. Skiplinks are useful for all users that navigate with the keyboard, and only a subset of those ...


11

The seo experts told us to put rel="nofollow" to all external links. Trying to massage PR (for want of a better term) in this way sounds like a very outdated concept to me. Is e-Commerce any different in this respect? If a site is worth linking to it should be "follow". Generally, rel="nofollow" should only be used on paid-for or untrusted (ie. user-...


10

Yes, the ALTernate attribute acts as 'anchor text' for links that contain images. A recent test found both Bing and Google indexed/ranked ALT attribute values: http://www.webmasterworld.com/google/4265397.htm Also, you need to consider that Google operates functionally like the lowest common browsing denominator (like a Lynx browser, or as one SEO put it '...


10

Google does not just ignore links in sections that are display:none. Consider DHTML multi-level drop down menus. In such a menu, you hover over the top level menu item and a list of links drops down. That is a case in which the links are in display:none initially, but user interaction with the page shows them. Using drop down menus like this is ...


10

As long as the number is balanced and the link targets are not spammy sites, then there is no reason to worry about. However, you may want to add some sort of filter that allows dofollow links only to users with a trusted reputation. Another alternative is to limit the maximum number of links in a document. You can either set an absolute limit or compute ...


9

As mentioned is this answer there is a new method of doing this: Referrer Policy/meta tag. See spec and example in this q&a.


9

Browsers do not try one protocol and then fall back to the other. The browser will use which ever protocol it is linked to. If that protocol isn't supported, the user will get an error. If you want to force users to use one protocol, you can redirect from one to the other. For example, to force secure connection on your site use the following rewrite ...


9

Computers, mobiles and tablets can send fax's with software, its just like sending an email, it was added to rfc2086 15 years ago but it never took off and as far as I know no major browsers support href="fax:" they do however support href="tel:" that can be used just the same to send a fax using software. 2.3 "fax" URL scheme The URL syntax is ...


9

Effect for browser: Though this looks like a bit of work for web browser, but technically it does not make much of a difference. The browsers are too fast to handle these relative url structure and make a call to application server Effect for application Server: None, as it needs to return the requested file (relative/absolute link ultimately maps to a ...


9

What you propose could be argued as blackhat SEO which can find your ranking negatively affected. At no times should pages or links be cloaked in any way. If you are wanting to prevent ranking passing on to the links then you can add the rel="nofollow" attribute to the links to ensure that they are not followed through to the destination site. If however you ...


8

I also had this same problem. I solve by adding meta tag like below and it will be work only in Chrome and Safari. <meta name="Referrer" content="origin">


8

Search engines that recognize and crawl iframes, like Google, should treat this similarly to a backlink. Here's a report confirming this: Links In IFrames Pass Value In Google Whether iframe's have the same ranking benefits (i.e., 'juice') as regular backlinks depends on the attributes and tags used: iframes support Global Attributes, including title ...


8

Search engines crawlers follow the most restrictive rule. If you use nofollow in your meta tag, no link will be followed. If you use follow in your meta tag, all links will be followed except those with rel="nofollow". So answer to your question is no, meta tag with follow doesn't override individual rel="nofollow". http://googlewebmastercentral.blogspot....


8

I can't see any reason why Google would think a hidden "Skip to content" link was deceptive. Are you flooding the page with hidden keywords or trying to deceive the search engines? No. Google is no doubt very aware of "skip to content"-like links. They have been recommended by the W3C after all. Google does state (in the article you link to) that "not all ...


8

Okay. To begin. The term toxic link is not used by Google. It is fully an SEO chatter class invention and some are using this term to either gain users to their site and scare the bejeebers out of you as well as carve out importance for themselves or sell you something. As far as Google is concerned, there is no such thing as a toxic link. There are bad ...


8

Some SEOs are wary of using these non-Latin characters in URLs because of the way it might display in certain browsers, or in certain text cases when the link is copied and pasted somewhere online. While having spammy-looking links is never a good thing, I personally think the possible benefit in search results is worth the drawback. For example,...


7

To Begin I must apologize to those who are in favor of TL;DRs. I have included a list of links Google does not like at the top just for you! This is one of my famous long answers. But it is important and sometimes a short answer simply will not do. If you know me, sometimes I leave comments with "Short answer. No." Or Yes as the occasion dictates. This is ...


7

Linked text should tell a visitor what they will find on that page W3C offers this advice about how to use link text in their Web Content Accessibility Guidelines: Good link text should not be overly general; don't use "click here." Not only is this phrase device-dependent (it implies a pointing device) it says nothing about what is to be found if ...


7

In general, from a SEO point of view, read more links are implemented on blogs for the following reasons: to avoid duplicate content between homepage and articles (the main reason) for visitors to see more article titles on the home page (to act as a sort of table of contents) to pass more PageRank to an article if the read more links point to an anchor in ...


7

There is no such thing as "dofollow". All links are followed unless specifically stated otherwise (nofollow).


7

Having a duplicate set of navigation links isn't going to change how Google sees your site much. In fact, when Googlebot encounters a second link to the same destination in a page, it generally ignores it: PageRank is only passed to the first link Anchor text only counts for the first link Having duplicate navigation is very common. I've worked with ...


6

Hi NotMuchOfAProgrammer, It's not a real backlink since the JavaScript is injecting the URL after the page has been loaded. If you disable JavaScript you will see: <noscript> <a href="http://ads.garden.org/www/delivery/ck.php?n=aa4a0d78&amp;cb=INSERT_RANDOM_NUMBER_HERE" target="_blank"> <img src="http://ads.garden.org/www/...


6

Sadly you can not referrer on HTTPS to sites using HTTP. You can however do HTTPS to HTTPS or HTTP to HTTPS. SOURCE Clients SHOULD NOT include a Referer header field in a (non-secure) HTTP request if the referring page was transferred with a secure protocol. A work around would be to use a internal redirect script that rather than directing ...


6

Like I said (dramatically and poorly) in my comments, it is not an acceptable practice. nofollow is designed for webmasters to disavow links on their own website that they do not have editorial control over. The best example of this are blogs with links to the websites of commentors. This was a common source of spam and this allows blogs to allow the users ...


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