15

A "3xx redirect" is an HTTP request/response so you need to use a service that accepts an HTTP request. So, either: Some domain registrars might offer an additional service to HTTP redirect the domain (most don't). Point the domain you want to redirect, to a web hosting account and configure the redirect there. Either in .htaccess (on Apache) or ...


9

Some sort of hosting is required For a domain to redirect to another domain, it needs to have some sort of web hosting. Only a web server for the domain can issue the redirect that you need. You have several options The biggest domain registrars such as GoDaddy and NameCheap offer free redirect services for any domain you register through them. However ...


4

You can do this using mod_rewrite near the top of your .htaccess file. In its simplest form this would be something like: RewriteEngine On # Remove "index.html" RewriteRule (.*)index\.html$ /$1 [R=301,L] The regex (.*)index\.html$ matches any URL-path that ends with index.html and captures the part of the URL-path before index.html. The $1 ...


3

You cant tell if a site has been hacked purely from status codes. If it is going to a spammy dating site it likely has been hacked, or the site may be hooked into a questionable advertising network. In either case its likely appropriate to give the webmaster a heads-up. As an outsider there are only a limited number of things you can do to see if a site ...


2

This can be done, for example, with an external tool like https://httpstatus.io/. just enter the URL you want to start with. The result will then show you whether the page could be opened directly with a 2xx code, or whether there are one or more redirects (301) in between. It is common, for example, that the request for www.example.com is redirected to ...


2

Google will periodically re-check the redirecting URL to see what it is now doing. So you can change what it does and after a time, Google will catch on to it.


1

The canonical is correct as long as there is only one and all URLs that access page show the same canonical. It is your choice as to which one but it is definitely best-practice that the canonical matches the redirect. Remember that Googlebot also follows redirects, so if you have setup a Permanent Redirect, then there is only one visitable URL anyway. If ...


1

Yes. When you choose to permanently redirect a page / url (which a 301 is): you should try to replace the existing links to the original destination as soon as possible. Some reasons: user and crawler friendliness (less redirect is faster) prevent others to link to the old destination in the future prevent 404 error's in your redirect solution malfunctions ...


1

You should update your sitemap with the new URLs immediately. Google uses XML sitemaps as one of the ways to determine which URLs you prefer. When you have old redirecting URLs in your sitemap, it sends mixed messages to Googlebot. It isn't a problem for Googlebot to crawl the new URLs before it finds the redirects. When Googlebot find new URLs, it does ...


1

On Apache 2.4 you can convert the URL-path to lowercase in .htaccess (only) with an Apache Expression in a RewriteCond (mod_rewrite) directive. No need to define a RewriteMap in the server config (or write a plethora of rules to replace each letter one by one). For example: RewriteEngine On RewriteCond expr "tolower(%{REQUEST_URI}) =~ /(.*)/" ...


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