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31

Google's Duplicate Content webmaster guide defines duplicate content (for purposes of search engine optimization) as "substantive blocks of content within or across domains that either completely match other content or are appreciably similar". Google's guide goes on to list the following as examples of duplicate content: Discussion forums that can ...


24

You can't redirect your old sites without losing 90% of their value and risking a penalty on your new site. There usually isn't a huge cost to leaving old sites up and running. You could use them to advertise your new site. Put a banner about your new site on every page of your old sites.


12

First, something that's implied in other answers, but should probably be spelled out: the situation you describe is something Google actively wants to discourage -- you're not "collateral damage" in their fight against spammers, you are their intended target in their fight against irrelevant and 'deceptive' results. ('Deceptive' in the sense that you think ...


11

The important thing to know is that (as stated here) the change only applies to mobile searches: This change will affect mobile searches in all languages worldwide and will have a significant impact in our search results. If you do not have a mobile friendly site, your ranking on desktop Google searches should not be affected. Google may not class it as ...


10

First of all, use better alt attributes. Seriously, "Cross" and "Checkmark" are horrible alt attributes. To see why, try viewing your page in a text-only browser. With your HTML as it is, you'll see something like: Unregistered Basic Premium ------------------------------------------------------------------- ...


10

It is perfectly valid for the alt attribute to be blank, if the images are purely decorational. Otherwise, if you are outputting the same image over and over then it makes sense that the alt attribute be the same for all of them. There is no negative SEO benefit to that, and your cross/tick images are unlikely to rank in image searches anyway. One ...


10

Google penalizes for text that is not visible to the users. White text on a white background can be used for keyword stuffing. In that case the keywords are put in the page source where Googlebot indexes them, but the font color makes it so that users don't see it. Shadow text is not cloaking because the user can see it clearly. There is no risk of ...


8

Panic not! From: http://googlewebmastercentral.blogspot.com/2015/02/finding-more-mobile-friendly-search.html Starting April 21, we will be expanding our use of mobile-friendliness as a ranking signal. [Update] Please note: John Mueller has just told us that this only effects searches made by mobile users. To quote: Just to be clear about the ...


7

Bad Idea! Never, I repeat NEVER do that. I tried that 3 days ago and after couple of days the site to which I redirected completely lost all its rankings. Not even it was ranking on searching domain.com in Google. All indexed pages are still there but the site lost its ranking completely. I can provide the links of the sites as proof but that's not allowed ...


6

There is nothing wrong with having duplicate alt tags as its job is to describe the images for screen readers and users who have images disabled. So if you have the images on the page many times then it is likely you will have duplicate alt tags - it is semantically correct. Saying all that you could however describe your images differently for each one e.g....


6

You can remove the image from the td and just add it to the td instead. In your example you don't actually need the image, it has no content value, or SEO value. Because of that, you can do this: <td class="center Crossed" title="Cross"></td> .Cross{ background: url('/images/cross.png') no-repeat center center; height: 15px; } This has ...


6

It's important to note that there is no official number that is classed as keyword stuffing and every page/site is different. But in your example it's not a matter if its keyword stuffing or not. You should be making your URLs for your visitors and not the search engines. Your unnecessary repeating the words, words such as 'new' are stop words and you no ...


6

As to whether Google penalizes (special attention to this word) a site for being stagnant. The answer is "No." Absolutely not. Here is what you are missing. Google uses a TTL style metric to gauge any pages freshness. TTL stands for Time To Live and is used to do two things: one, gauge how often to re-fetch the page; and two, use as a metric for the SERPs. ...


6

Google announced that they will start penalizing pages that are not mobile friendly in the mobile search results: Starting April 21, we will be expanding our use of mobile-friendliness as a ranking signal. This change will affect mobile searches in all languages worldwide and will have a significant impact in our search results. Consequently, users will ...


5

Google views "keyword stuffing" as using keywords ways that are not natural. Placing a list of keywords at the bottom of a page is certainly not natural. You wouldn't be doing that if you weren't trying to rank for those keywords. On the other hand, a small list (less than ten) of relevant keywords is unlikely to get you penalized, so your approach isn't ...


5

The problem is not the forum signature itself, it's the fact that the link is "optimized". If instead of "Company Registration" you had your company's name as the anchor text for the link, it'd be fine. If detected, all forum footer comments with optimized keywords in links are classed as "spam", or more specifically "link schemes" as as defined here: ...


5

301 Redirects are completely fine if they're real. If you had an old site and then decided to move/combine it with some other related site, there's absolutely no problem putting up a 301 redirect on the old site to send users to the new site. You should not be penalized for this in Google and if you are, they're completely reasonable about fixing it if you ...


5

One thing that all your sites have in common is you. Why not throw a designed by link at the bottom of your site that links to your "portfolio" where your new business is prominently displayed.


5

One line answer: Do not think too much about keywords vs heading tags. Create content which will be useful for the user. Meaning: You can have h1, few h2 and so on. But don't think too much as you need to place keywords in each. Try to have generic headings which may or may not include keywords in each. Instead of worrying about keywords and heading tags ...


4

Firstly, I think Stephen's assertion that a search results page will result in a site penalty is wrong. The blog post in question simply states Google may "take action to reduce search results," which implies your search results pages will rank lower in Google's results (or be ignored) and the rest of the site will be unaffected. However, the key to this ...


4

The best thing to do is not worry about the traffic to your old sites. I had a good friend who graduated from Harvard Business. He told stories about how Harvard drummed into his head the mantra of "Know when to cut your losses." every day one way or another. From a business perspective, this is excellent advice! It is good advice in life too!! You are ...


4

You won't have any SEO penalty as Search Engines will see a brand new website. On the contrary, the domain age and registration length may be a good factor for SEO if it has never been blacklisted.


3

No. Google won't penalize your site for removing a part of it, you can do it. However, if you can't redirect old URLs from the new ones, mark your old URLs as Gone (410 HTTP status) with an .htaccess file (if you use Apache as a web server).


3

This has been discussed twice on WebmasterWorld: Random or Structured Internal Links for Related Products? Google SEO News and Discussion forum at WebmasterWorld Will randomly generated links confuse rankings? Google SEO News and Discussion forum at WebmasterWorld There certainly isn't a consensus in those threads. Here are some excerpts from the ...


3

You can arm yourself against this by using the rel=author meta tag for all your content then you are claiming it as your own. If people should copy your content, they will get "outed" with the engines. It comes down to building Author Ranking. Check also this one: Google Confirms Author Ranking; What Does That Mean To You?. But if someone stole your ...


3

I'll answer each paragraph in order to try to be a "Rosetta Stone" for for Google are broadly labelling as Doorway Pages. For example, searchers might get a list of results that all go to the same site. This technique is colloquially referred to as 'Google Bombing', 'SERP Bombing' or some variation thereof amongst the SEO field. This refers to ...


3

As you know the major problem here is that you tables are causing the lower part of the page to overflow. While this may only seem a problem until you get to the bottom it actually becomes a problem on some devices the moment they stroke their screen. This is because they may stroke the touch screen at an angle and will result in shifting the page to the ...


3

I'm asked this question a lot by customers. I don't recommend or see a reason to block the google bots completely. You could use a robots.txt file to list and stop them indexing the parts of the site that are under development and are not content rich. I've not come across any form of penalty for having part of the site under development and still being ...


3

This happens to just about everyone somewhere along the line. I had made a bad/silly mistake in an algorithm that detected bad bots and resulted in about 24,000 pages that told Google that it was a bad bot. Kinda funny when you think about it! You are not penalized. Your pages rank should all come back just fine. You were just serving the wrong page. Once ...


3

We were hit by the same problem as the OP - our site blacklisted so that all Chrome users were getting a big scary red message about "The site ahead contains malware. Attackers currently on [site name] might attempt to install dangerous programmes on your computer that steal or delete your information (for example, photos, passwords, messages and credit ...


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