Hot answers tagged

13

Hiding <h1> tag can hurt SEO because <h1> tag is a very good spot to optimize a webpage for a keyword. If I were you, I will try to reduce the size of the text in the <h1> tag or something similar but I won't hide this tag from search engines.


11

I would say it wouldn't harm much, nor will it add anything. I prefer to keep my header tags clean and wouldn't add the i. The inline styling would be a bigger problem, which isn't really an big issue. Instead of doing this, you can add the gear icon to the H2 directly: h2.Geared:before{ display: inline-block; color: rgb(102, 149, 45); font-...


9

No, in all likelihood this will have zero impact on your SEO. While it does offer some benefits in terms of accessibility (because it helps the screen readers), the order of your headings doesn't appear to be linked to your SEO.


8

They're both correct in html5, html allows block elements in inline elements. This also has no effect on SEO, both cases the text is wrapped in the heading, so it remains to have the same value. It's not a choice of validness, but a preference in User Interface: If you wrap the header around the anchor, you create a large anchor, only the text will be ...


6

It can be appropriate to use br in heading elements. An example from the HTML5 spec: <h1>Ramones <br> <span>Hey! Ho! Let's Go</span> </h1> If it’s appropriate in your case depends on your actual content (a heading listing three keywords is most likely not a good idea in the first place). However, even for inappropriate uses ...


6

Here is an article that has the same answer I would give: H3, H4, H5, and H6 tags are not useful for SEO. They do however show how heading should be used on a category page and do recommend putting each product name into an H2: Category page: H1: Category title. H2: Titles of products listed. H3: In most cases nothing. H4: In most cases ...


6

There seems to be a few things to consider. The first thing to know is that search engines do not match keywords as the SEO community would like you to believe. Instead, various forms of linguistic semantic analysis is conducted against the content. Here is more of how that works. Please stick with me, it will all make sense in the end. When a web page is ...


6

Google pays almost no attention to which tags you use these days. Google cares about how the page looks to users. It cares about which text is big. It cares about which text is prominent. It cares about which text is hidden. Recent SEO tests have shown that there is no difference between using a <div> tag that is styled to look like a heading ...


6

Yes, headings are still relevant for SEO, because they briefly describe topics of sections, they help organize your web page in a clear way, useful to show organized content for end users and help Search Engines to understand your content better. Designs can vary a lot, so a basic approach to your question would be: If you are listing cities, do they also ...


5

To begin, none of your examples have anything to do with semantics. Your question is based completely on the parser model where the page is read top-to-bottom in the traditional way. For this reason, your first example is correct. The following examples will fail to give you predictable results and can cause you serious heart-burn. Please understand that ...


5

One line answer: Do not think too much about keywords vs heading tags. Create content which will be useful for the user. Meaning: You can have h1, few h2 and so on. But don't think too much as you need to place keywords in each. Try to have generic headings which may or may not include keywords in each. Instead of worrying about keywords and heading tags ...


5

HTML provides semantic markup to a document. CSS provides information about the presentation. Choosing to use a H5 because of the styling it offers is the wrong reason to use. The only reason why headings, and all tags in HTML, have any styles at all are because web browsers want to be nice and apply default styles to elements. If their chosen default styles ...


4

All of Stephen Ostermiller's answer is correct and Google is indeed now working to reward quality content rather than elements that are easy to spam. However, having an <h1> tag on a page is good practice and good for accessibility. It tells bots and screen readers that the text within those tags indicates the title on the page. If Google is rewarding ...


4

Its OK not to use H1 tags. On page optimization techniques and page structure matter much less to SEO now than they did even two years ago. You still need to use keywords and synonyms in the text of your pages and the title tag is the place in the page that matter the most. Beyond that, using H1, bold, and link anchor text may help a very small amount if ...


4

Hiding it specifically for the purposes of delivering different content to the search engines is called cloaking and is black hat SEO. This is a great way to hurt your rankings up to and including being removed from Google's search results. So, yeah, bad idea.


4

The rules are simple regarding to this: You are not allowed to wrap an inline element around a block element. The exception: If you use HTML5, you may wrap in anchor around a block element. From a SEO perspective it doesn't have influence, it's valid html so they wont discredit for that. It doesn't help either. You're ramming a whole paragraph into an ...


3

I think it actually makes quite a lot of sense. Here are some cases, were I think this would be usefull: The Title of your side is a heading (e.g. name of the company, should maybe even be the topmost h1). This would be similar to the Logo of your side, and it’s usually convention to link this to the homepage/main url of your site You have a list of posts/...


3

<h1> is what defines the most important title on your page, and that makes a huge difference for SEO purposes. If you don't like your <h1> size or look you can always change it with CSS. Here is video where Matt Cutts talks about overdoing <h1>, from there you can see the value.


3

What counts for a search engine is textual content, it will filter out everything else. In-line CSS will contribute to the payload of the page and that affects the load speed.


3

Don’t use another heading element for the duplicated content. Headings (h1-h6) serve various purposes (generating the document outline, navigation for screen reader users, etc.). A duplicated heading is useless and can be bothersome or lead to confusion. Using a different element and styling it according to your intended design is the correct way. Using p ...


3

In html5 the nav element should be used to represent a section of a page that links to other pages or to parts within the page So depending what kind of links you are specifying in the footer section you might avoid inserting them within a nav element: Not all groups of links on a page need to be in a nav element — the element is primarily intended ...


3

You didn't state who makes the recommendation but the specification itself says no such thing. A heading begins sectioning content and there may be more than one sectioning content on a page. However, what you are asking about, is the "document outline" and it does not exist in browsers today. In particular note this reference from one of the HTML authors ...


3

Using a span like that does not hurt SEO, however there is no reason to do it when the ::first-letter pseudoelement exists. You can do the following to style just the first letter without messing with your markup: h1 { font-size: (your preferred font size for the rest of the text); } h1::first-letter { font-size: (your larger font size for the first ...


3

Today Google can Crawl your AJAXed content Today, as long as you're not blocking Googlebot from crawling your JavaScript or CSS files, we are generally able to render and understand your web pages like modern browsers. But it recommends following the principles of progressive enhancement. https://webmasters.googleblog.com/2015/10/deprecating-our-ajax-...


3

Search engines should understand it as a h1 level heading: Something different. Use of the <span> element in this example would appear to be proper. The HTML <span> element is a generic inline container for phrasing content, which does not inherently represent anything. It can be used to group elements for styling purposes (using the ...


2

What's said here's is insightfull, thank you all. Let's take it up one more notch: adding microdata and such into the equation. Let's say we've got <h1 itemprop="name"><a href="http://goldenage.com/maths.html" itemprop="url">Mathematics in The Muslim Golden Age</a></h1> competing with <a href="http://goldenage.com/maths.html" ...


2

Give google a slightly altered page that contains the H2 tags. But I think this falls into the "Black Hat SEO" category. And I don't want that. You are correct, that is considered black hat by Google. They call it "cloaking". Put the heading. Hide it with CSS. Everyone wins, including accessibility tools witch can determine the structure of the page ...


2

Keep it natural and serve best value for your audience. If you only repair HP computers, then this should be made pretty obvious when visitors land on your website. Page titles should contain this so users of search engines are aware of this prior to clicking through to your website. There oughtn't be a need for this message to be replicated through page's ...


2

If it makes your site better, hide it. If you site is better people will visit it more. If people visit it more people will link to it more. If people link to it more your rankings will be amazing. Just make your site good. Most of this other stuff is turd polishing.


2

While hiding <h1> can cause you problems, it depends on how you use it. However, we have no way of knowing what specifically Google looks for. In our case, we hide <h1> on our index page because it would be redundant and in the way but necessary for the outline and text only readers. This has not hurt our rankings at all.


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