9

Moving my answer from Stack Overflow where your question was off-topic This is a very unusual suggestion - I've never once seen any of the SEO experts even hint at something like this. It sounds like something that used to work years ago - a bit like keyword stuffing - and could be considered to be a "black hat" these days. It certainly doesn't ...


8

During my extensive web searches I have found a quote which I find useful and suspect that future readers of this question will also. Use <h1> for top-level heading <h1> is the HTML element for the first-level heading of a document: If the document is basically stand-alone, for example Things to See and Do in Geneva, the top-level ...


4

The vocabulary Schema.org can be used: Question type: A specific question - e.g. from a user seeking answers online, or collected in a Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) document. Answer type: An answer offered to a question; perhaps correct, perhaps opinionated or wrong. You can specify the accepted answer with the acceptedAnswer property. By the way, ...


3

I don't see any reason that breaking the titles like this could boost SEO in any measurable way. The general rule of thumb for SEO is that if it makes no sense to have your page set up some way and it goes against web standards, it's probably bad not just for SEO but for your site at large (you've already discovered that it's bad for accessibility). Good SEO ...


3

Imagine you have a camera manual printed on paper. You can have a diagram of all elements on page 1, this diagram is figure no. 1. On page 16 you can write "look at figure No. 1" This implies that a figure can be on another part of the page because you need to have it on that other part of the page. But for the SEO point of view, a figure can have (and ...


3

Theoretically, it’s sufficient to specify only the @id: "author": {"@id": "http://example.com/about/#bob"} If a consumer already knows the entity with this @id URI (e.g., after having crawled the "about" page), they don’t need to see its properties here again. If a consumer doesn’t already know the entity with this URI, they have the chance to learn more ...


2

The instructions for the Good Relations on-line snippet generator tool only states to update the XHTML/HTML page header, and their Quickstart guide states for each example to: Insert the additional HTML markup given below anywhere in the body section... I do not see instructions to "post it before the closing <body> tag of your webpages." Also, ...


2

Use the built-in content negotiation functionality with a type map. You may need to tweak your filenames / URLs or use rewrite rules after applying the type map.


2

It won't hurt your SEO because Google establishes what is what on page regardless, things like breadcrumbs get detected by Google regardless of the positioning and markup used in the source code. However, if you want a semantic website then you should resolve this, a simple fix would be to edit your 'loop' in your WordPress, and if I'm not mistaken your ...


2

RDF is a W3C standard for representing data using three-part { identifier, attribute name, attribute value} data structures. SPARQL is the query language for querying RDF data. The W3C's RDF Schema Language (RDFS) lets you declare classes, properties, and relationships between them using RDF, and their Web Ontology Language (OWL) lets you get fancier with ...


2

For an article about the concept of "success", you could use something like this, using only Schema.org: <article itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Article"> <div itemprop="about" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Intangible"> <meta itemprop="name" content="Success" /> </div> </article> To allow consumers to ...


2

We have tended to add API paths on an appropriate (to our applications) data- attribute on a suitable element close to the usage. <input type="text" name="term" data-autocomplete-url="/api/ui/customapi/searchautocomplete?text={0}" value="" /> This can then be picked up by your JS and used as needed....


2

Is <div role="complementary"> equal to <aside>? In the docs is written the exact answer to this: Note: Using the element will automatically communicate a section has a role of complementary. Developers should always prefer using the correct semantic HTML element over using ARIA. So the answer is, yes, they are equal, but you should ...


2

I encourage this. Structured data is supposed to help Search Engines understand what a web page is about. If your page features information about an entity, including semantic markup that references the entity can help search engines better understand that your page is relevant to/about the entity and rank your page more appropriately. Structured Data that ...


2

NO. This misses the point of SEO. By breaking up linguistic data across multiple "environments", the information is artificially "out of context" for Google's algorithms and presents difficulties for interpretation and categorization. In the "big picture" Google wants your content to be useful for people, so context is important....


2

In one word the answer would be NO. But adding keyword in header helps user to understand about the topic/page. For helping in SEO you must follow Google's guidelines. As @FluffyKiten said: It certainly doesn't meet Google's (admittedly vague) guidelines


2

If your goal is to cover the most social media platforms, I would recommend using Open Graph tags and getting used to their limitations. The Open Graph standard is supported by Twitter, Facebook, and many other social media sites. If you specifically want Twitter to show the twitter account of the author and website, add the following code in addition to ...


2

Both of Schema.org and ALT tag are for the same purpose: to provide an additional information. But, there is a substantial difference between both too: while Schema.org provides data only to the machine (Google and other search engines making use of it), the ALT serves for humans too - in cases an image isn't displayed, in text browsers, for people who can'...


2

If you want marking up of music then its best to use microdata such as SCHEMA MusicAlbum. Also, not sure what guides your following but hgroup was deprecated eons ago! A typical good example would look something like this: <main itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/MusicAlbum"> <h1 itemprop="name">Album Name</h1> <meta content=...


1

The relevant markup from the linked example is: <body itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/WebPage"> <main itemprop="mainContentOfPage"> <div itemprop="breadcrumb"> <span prefix="v: http://rdf.data-vocabulary.org/#"> <span typeof="v:Breadcrumb"><a href="/" rel="v:url" property="v:title">Home</a&...


1

Hiding content is quite dodgy. I would avoid this where possible. Save the hiding and showing for interactive elements. I would title the page appropriately with a H1, then each section I would assign a H2. If you're exceeding ten sections you will still experience a slight hit on your SEO as I believe the limit is ten H2's before it is considered a ...


1

WebApplication (which is a subtype of SoftwareApplication) seems to be the type you need. <div itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/WebApplication"> </div> To convey that the web app is the current page, you could use WebPage in addition. Either make it a MTE and use both types together, or use mainEntity. <div itemscope itemtype="http://...


1

Oh Lord where to begin! The semantic web is not a thing. It is not something you do. As a term, it originally did not apply to the World Wide Web. It is a scientific principle. You just create your web content for humans and not for machines. That is, for the most part, all you need to know. There are certain SEO tactics that take advantage of certain ...


1

(I adjusted my answer that I gave to your (now closed) question on SO.) When a user-agent (including search engines) parses your RDFa, it doesn’t matter which element the RDFa is used on (except for special parsing rules). The user-agents learns something like the following: There is a business entity (http://purl.org/goodrelations/v1#BusinessEntity) ...


1

If you have SMW, the solution is extremely simple. You can list the pages in question by adding them to a specific category. The category members can then be listed in the format you prefer. A simple list, suitable e.g. for use in the middle of text or for a non-distracting navigation box, is then as simple as {{#ask: [[Category:Finnish]] | format=list }}. ...


1

Note: This snippet on its own is not doing what you want because you didn’t specify any vocabulary. Here in my answer I’ll use the schema: prefix as specified in the RDFa Core Initial Context. (Not needed if you have a vocab on a parent element.) The author property takes one name. And it expects a Person (or Organization) type as value. And it doesn’t make ...


1

I believe it's a combination of the page having a verified name and URL.


1

I would dispute the use of a H1 or any heading level for the 'Product Name' in the header. The H1 represents the title of the page not the product, application or site. Both for Accessibility and SEO purposes a repeated H1 on every page would be detrimental. Unfortunetaly in this case there is no semantic HTML tag that means 'site title' so the only option ...


1

You could use the product schema class for each product, and then specify the INCI's using an additional (custom) property for each one, for example if your shampoo had Shea Butter and Water as ingredients (clearly I'm no expert on cosmetics!): <div itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Product"> <img itemprop="image" src="shampoo123.jpg" alt="" /...


1

The rich snippets that you are talking about are pulled from the Google knowledge graph which allows certain rich content to be appended to the top search results where the Google algorithms deem it most appropriate. Google uses machine learning techniques to distinguish data from the structured layout of your page. As a webmaster you can use microdata to ...


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