Hot answers tagged

14

It makes no difference to SEO. Just remember to put your keyword at the beginning of the title and the branding at the end. Search engines always place more importance at the beginning of a text block and you should always rank for your branded terms. Check out this resource of best practice for writing meta titles: http://www.seomoz.org/learn-seo/title-tag


13

Actually, the answer above is incorrect. You would need to read the question carefully. In this case, the title tag is too long and Google decided to use what it determines as a brand which is simply the domain name without the TLD. I detailed the process in this answer: My title tag doesn't appear to be getting crawled by Google properly But I will ...


13

I would say that "-" is better for users. The minus/dash is a "regular" character they are more likely to have come across and know the location of the key. Stack Exchange uses the "-" to separate the prepended tags from the actual title. This question is: seo - Which symbol should I use in Meta Title: “|” or “-”? - Stack Exchange. The Guardian uses "|" ...


10

I would think neither would make a difference except for preference. Search engines are looking at word boundries (programming term) when parsing a string and would not recognize these characters as either a word nor a part of an HTML tag and likely will ignore them completely. From an SEO perspective, they would likely be totally ignored. [Update] It ...


9

Bare with me. I will explain what changes Google has made followed by how Google decides how to make the SERP link and what specifically happened in your case. Google has been changing the look and feel of the SERPs since March 2014 with the hopes of improving the user experience and click-through rates (CTR). It is believed that changing the SERP look and ...


9

For HTML5, there is no title metadata name. You may only use values defined in the HTML5 spec or registered in the WHATWG wiki, and as title is not registered, you can’t have an element like: <meta name="title" content="…"> <!-- invalid in HTML5 --> In HTML 4.01, you may use any value (there is no registry): <meta name="title" content="…"&...


9

Yes, <meta name="title" ../> is superfluous. It is clear, after reading the HTML specification of the meta tag: The meta element represents various kinds of metadata that cannot be expressed using the title, base, link, style, and script elements. So the meta title doesn't provide any additional information to the title tag, and it is not even ...


9

I contacted John Mueller at Google about this issue. He had his team take a look at it and got back to me with the answer. The word "behance" is coming from an SVG image on your page. The image is https://onceuponafoodblog.com/wp-content/plugins/simple-social-icons/symbol-defs.svg and it has a number of <title> elements in its source code, the ...


8

No, the content of the title element and the path of the URL don't have to match. Think of all the sites that use only IDs in the URL path, e.g. YouTube: URL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sP4NMoJcFd4 Title: Songify This - CAN&#39;T HUG EVERY CAT (now on iTunes) -- a song about loving cats - YouTube Also, most of the times the title content will be ...


8

Google hasn't publicly stated that the first 68 charatcers of a title are the most important and as far as I know no definitive research as been done to demonstrate this. Google's advice for page titles is, "Make sure that your elements ... are descriptive and accurate." When it comes to writing titles, it should contain a conscise summary of what the page ...


8

No, it does not influence in ranking, because that pages is not indexed at all, also it does not harmful for your site in some ways, but if you are placing too many noindex tags, then those pages will kept some PageRank or JuicyRank. Most of webmaster including me using noindex tag on specific directory, that have no quality content for example, list of ...


7

Better question would be: Are two words a relevant pagetitle to that page? It's a bit minimal, but if relevant, it's no problem. But I dont think it can be very relevant with only two words.


7

Radiom is not a term. Radio is. Google is using n-gram analysis and term ontologies trying to understand your domain name for semantic value. The best it can come up with is radio and M. If, for example, radiom was a strong brand, then the result would be different. Google uses more than one ontology to understand domain names including an ontology of brand ...


6

i know that only one h1 is recommended This was never really true, just some people's opinion. That was due to people trying to game SEO: If you only have a single H1 in a document, it's important as a result of being the only one, not because it's supposed to be the only one. And if you're using HTML5, it's really not true, with the introduction of the ...


6

Some ways non-existent pages end up in Google's Index There is 3 ways that non-existent pages can end up on Google's or any other search engine for that matter and these are: Your pages are linking to these pages. (This can be in sitemap, a profile page, a blog comment or a href based a link...) I've seen some plugins from WordPress for example that ...


6

No there is not, Google will reflect the changes when it crawls and processes your pages again. This whole process may take from days to weeks and you can't force Google to do it right away. Even if those conflicts are already solved, they could still be showing up in Webmaster Tools.


6

Only regard to branding. Otherwise, it does not matter. For example, if you are trying to brand the website, meaning you want the domain name to be recognizable as a brand, then yes. Put it in. Otherwise there is no real value that I can see. Branding a website is to connect the website name to perceived value. For example stackexchange.com has a reputation ...


6

If it’s only colon vs. pipe: Use the pipe. 1. The colon might (more) often be part of the page title. It might be confusing to have two colons. Example for an article called "Top 10: Songs": Example.com: Top 10: Songs It seems as if "Top 10" would be some kind of second-level category here. 2. The site title should come after the page title. The colon ...


6

This is an easy one. Your title tag is too long. Prior to the recent Google font size change in the SERPs, the rule was to have a title tag no longer than 55 characters. With the font change, I am assuming about 45 characters, though that may not be a precise answer. If a title tag is too long, Google will make one up. You want to avoid this as much as ...


6

Google maintains a list of all the meta tags that it uses. It lists the <title> tag (although it notes that it is technically not a meta tag). It does not list <meta name="title"> tags. Most websites rank very well without meta tags named "title". I've never used such a tag myself before. Your use of a meta title tag would be ignored by ...


6

It seems to have to do with duplication of words in the Title. I ran a screaming frog of your site and noticed many Titles have the same words repeated. Take a look at this search: https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=designmynight&oq=designmynight+&aqs=chrome..69i57j69i60l5.9033j0j4&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8#q=designmynight+mexican+and+tequila+...


5

I quote you question below by pieces: it states that an HTML page title tag is really important in SEO. Absolutely TRUE, they are important for Google. It states that the Google Spider gives the most relevance to the first 68 characters of a site title. No official evidence of this statement, but it's true that Google shows only about 68 chars in ...


5

I’d have thought exactly the same: that there are no real pros or cons in where you place the TITLE element within the HTML document’s HEAD area. However, although this is nothing whatsoever to do with SEO, I do remember reading that in an HTML document, the best practise is to include the TITLE after the first META tag that declares the content-type and/or ...


5

Although the changes may not show up under HTML Improvements for a while, using the Fetch as Google tool helps you to see a page as Google sees it, including HTML code. It may also help to trigger re-crawling within a day according to this Google Webmaster Central Blog: The Fetch as Googlebot feature in Webmaster Tools now provides a way to submit new ...


5

You should also consider bookmarking and tabs Imagine if webmasters.stackexchange.com just had the title Webmasters. You go to bookmark it and would quickly forget what it is. From a User Experience point of few that's a problem. Or imagine if every /about.html was titled "About Us." Talk about a nightmare! So, are there any reasons to put the the brand ...


5

I would go with some version of option #1 because its clean and consistent which will help with click through rate. Whenever you are dealing with titles, think about the best way to quickly convey to the person what the page is about. For SEO I would focus on local. For your home page I would do something like "Dog Grooming - City, State | Example Dog ...


5

Proper selection of title / url permalink does make a difference to your seo rankings as the title / url put a strong emphasis on what the content of the page looks like and it should ideally match the content of your page as crawler is intelligent enough to identify the title you are giving to your page and content on that page. These matters for most of ...


5

Set the title as a variable and pass it to your include: <?php $page_title = 'Welcome to my site'; include("PHP/header.php"); ?> Then inside your header PHP you can use that variable. Here I'm using htmlspecialchars to ensure that <>& are properly escaped if they are used in the title. <title><?php echo htmlspecialchars($...


4

For many pages you can't, not without making the title either under-descriptive or really awkward and spammy at least. Front-loading is a really unnatural way to write. If you have general topics, like Wikipedia pages, then it's easy to do something like: Labradors Labrador training A/C repair But most blog articles, news posts, etc. out there aren't ...


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