6

Historically, Google said they ignored structured data which was not used to markup visible content. Because your snippet shows both date published and date updated as visible on-page content but the Moz example shows date published as non-visible meta data, I'd try tweaking that and seeing if it works to get Google to show the last update date instead.


4

It seems you are asking about putting more keywords in the article. We know from the latest Google Panda and Penguin updates, keywords in an article is least important. If due to certain modifications in the article a user spends more time with the article or even if due to some of the links (internal/external) you have put in the article which is ...


4

WebPage vs. Article Article would contain data about the actual (main) content, while WebPage would contain data about the whole page and everything on it (e.g., the site navigation/footer etc.). So it’s not necessarily either-or; it’s not uncommon to use both: <body itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/WebPage"> <article itemprop="mainEntity" ...


4

Firefox's readerview Microsoft's Read later thing Chrome's Readability Evernote's Clearly Safari's Reading List All of these have one thing in common.. they need text and they need properly formed HTML code behind them. Having these two things in your website will not only make them work with these new features but will also give you the benefit of ...


4

You can take either path here. What matters is how you go about it. Let's say you decide to delete those articles. That should be fine. Just make sure you 301 redirect those URL's to something better that's hopefully contextually similar. Take those articles out of the XML sitemap, too, and resubmit the sitemap. Before doing this, it may be worth it to check ...


4

You need to contact Google first (Click Express Interest Button at the end of article), to get approval, because fake news sites are everywhere. And if anybody just add live blog schema and Google show it the live label without checking the site quality and past activity, then Google will lose it's trust from many people. Google already pre-approve many ...


4

dateModified always has a potential value (there's always something you could set) and can be equal to or later than dateCreated. ‘Creating is modifying’ and a good example of this is the filesystem on whatever OS you're using — creating a file sets the dateCreated and the dateModified together, then subsequent edits change the dateModified. Whether or not ...


4

When Google finds two pages on different sites with the same content, it usually picks just one of them to include in the index. It usually picks the one that it considers the most authoritative. That may not be the one that was published first. If the site where your content is syndicated has good reputation and more inbound links than your site, ...


3

I don’t think that it’s a good practice to paginate articles (unless they are so long that it would affect the performance in the browser), because having exactly one canonical URL is preferable for so many reasons. I think there are two reasons why paginating articles was/is done: It increases the pages views. If a visitor is reading an article split up ...


3

SEO and the impact that any work has is not about length. Sure bloggers have echoed that blog posts should only be about 300-350 words, then 500, and so on. At one point, search engines rewarded blog posts as being timely and these posts were easily found by it's length. Then it was discovered that the bounce rate of blog posts was significant. The reason ...


3

This only benefits the original publishing site and can potentially harm you if you do this incorrectly. By re-posting the same content as the original site you now have duplicate content. This is something Google does not want. To remedy this you have to use canonical URLs. This tells Google that the other site is the original source of the information. ...


3

Since Google really likes fresh content, I don't think it will be a disadvantage to update your content: Google will crawl it and display a more fresh date next to your result in its search page People coming to your tutorial from Google won't come back on Google because your tutorial is up to date One thing you shouldn't do is update the url according to ...


2

For your site architecture, you can take inspiration from famous newspapers websites. In general, articles on these websites are categorized by theme (all economics articles in the same category, all sport articles in the same category, etc.). If your site has many articles, you can also create subcategories like for example football, tennis, golf, etc. ...


2

You need at least one <p> tag around the text, you want to see in Reader View and at least 516 characters in 7 words inside the text.


2

Here's the final mark-up I have on my page: <div itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Article"> <meta itemprop="datePublished" content="2014-05-09T05:40:51+01:00"> ... Page goes here... <time itemprop="dateModified" datetime="2015-02-22T14:55:06+00:00">Last Updated: 22 Feb 15</time> </div> Which gives me a ...


2

From the beginning, Google marked terms found as bold, italics, sentence case text, relative font size, and so forth as fancy in the index and felt this was important. At no point was it ever clear that Google assigned more weight to these fancy text terms, however, it was was matched in search more readily as a result. Spammers began to try and take ...


2

I would assume a big big reason for advertisement driven websites is that every time you change a page you can be presented with a different advertisement. I don't have enough points to make this just a comment. I see no other reason for the stumpy little pages some major websites offer.


2

Imagine you have a camera manual printed on paper. You can have a diagram of all elements on page 1, this diagram is figure no. 1. On page 16 you can write "look at figure No. 1" This implies that a figure can be on another part of the page because you need to have it on that other part of the page. But for the SEO point of view, a figure can have (and ...


1

200 words is not a lot of content. In general, I'd say 200 words is on the thin side and wouldn't usually answer searchers questions. Most of the time searchers would be be happier with your longer articles. 200 words could be fine for some news though. It might tell people what they need to know about a current event. Having those short news blurbs ...


1

The more I read about the Categories & Tags pages, the more I feel like you should not use them. I actually just wrote a post about that: No Categories & Tags. Why?! It all sounds good at first but I think that it diverts SEO juice and does not really improve your SERPs. Actually, I see two major problems: I don't see my users ever going to those ...


1

Schema.org sets no limits like that. It’s your text, it’s as long as it is. If you use articleBody, you should provide the full text. Otherwise you misuse this property, as it’s defined to hold the body of the article, not just a part of the body. For a teaser/summary/abstract, use description instead. Consumers might of course have technical limits when ...


1

Your code sample is a correct use of the article tag. Essentially, it is a semantics thing and can be used whenever you have grouped content with a changing repeatable element. To be fully (and pedantically) correct, you would also use a main tag around all of the article tags to introduce the main idea/grouping relationship of the articles but I very ...


1

@unor posted detailed answers here: New required mainEntityOfPage for article structured data https://stackoverflow.com/questions/34466028/how-to-implement-mainentityofpage-to-this-specific-site/34467088#34467088 It would be much easier to understand if Google's structured data testing tool would remove the warning if you don't specify mainEntityOfPage.@id ...


1

I do not know what Medium is, however, for copies of content you will need to use a canonical tag pointing to the original. This is how you tell Google that a particular content is a copy of another. Google used to take the first copy of any content they found and considered it the original. However, lately, Google has been allowing copies to rank higher ...


1

There seems to be no official documentation about this, see https://support.mozilla.org/en-US/questions/1067528. However, I'd advise trying wrapping your article in <article> tag.


1

The alias must be unique. If you can't find the conflicting item, also remember to check the trash.


1

It should be ok. Having similar/duplicate content on pages is common and normal. Especially product pages. As long as it does not make up a significant portion of the content you should be alright. Of course the question is "how much is too much"? The majority of your content is original (right?) and unique plus the similar/duplicate content isn't keyword ...


1

Infinite scroll is not SEO friendly. Google and other search engines will have trouble indexing the content that is not loaded into the page when it is first fetched. To get referrals from search engines to specific articles, you need have a page for each article. Search engines won't recommend specific articles from your site to their users if their ...


1

If the other blogger publishes the article, it can be not well received by Google because of duplicate content. However his website wont' be penalized. If you want avoid SEO problems, you can ask to Google to remove your webpage (article) from its index. You can do it in Webmaster Tools (menu Optimization => Remove URLs). If you don't use this functionality ...


1

This is duplicate content. Making a minor change does not make it unique content. Using the author markup will not make it acceptable. You should use canonical URLs on one of the pages. (If this article is the only duplicate content I wouldn't worry about it. BUt if you plan on doing this with a lot of content you will run into issues).


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