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53

@toomanyairmiles is partially correct - the purpose of this technique is to allow parallel connections from the web-browser to the server. Web browsers should allow a minimum of two simultaneous connections to a single host, but many new browsers can manage up to 60. Regardless, concurrent simultaneous connections between browser and web-server(s) is a major ...


32

Your image tags must currently look like: <img src="http://example.com/images/image.jpg"> That http in there means that the image is NOT served securely. An attacker could change the image in transit and thereby change how your otherwise secure page looks to your users. Instead you could use any of the following to serve the images securely: Link ...


18

Schema.org neither requires nor recommends specific image dimensions. For an ImageObject, you may specify the image’s height and width with the height and width properties. Consumers of the data would have their own rules, if any at all. In case of Google Search tl;dr: For some Rich Snippets that use the image property, no dimensions are specified. For ...


17

As the text is part of the logo, I would keep it in the image (saves on trying to match any non-standard fonts and having to position it exactly like it is in the logo) - you can always put it in the alt attribute or use microdata to to enhance your seo: <div id="main-logo-holder" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Organization"> <meta ...


15

Using Base64 encoded images will not bypass image blocking in email clients. It was a known technique used by spammers, and therefore no better than linking to remote files. A test from 2008 by Ron Blaisdell of the Email Marketer's Club (available here), showed the results of sending an email containing Base64 encoded images in the popular clients: ...


13

In the past, Web browsers were only able to download two items at once (now 6 or more), so downloading resources from various domains is faster than a single domain. This applies to everything from images to javascripts. Many companies also use a CDN, a tool which ensures the end user gets their data from a server that is geographically close to them, ...


12

ALT tag is an accessibility tag that was introduced for people who have sight difficulties even through Google use it to determine what an image is about you should never consider putting alt tags for SEO purposes before your visitors. Many people and even Matt Cutts who works at Google talks about alt tags like they were specifically designed for Search ...


12

The base64 image option should be used where you would only have a very small number of images and you want to eliminate the network overhead of fetching a picture from the server. However from what you are indicating in the question I assume this could scale to a large number of images. In this case I would use a single 1px x 1px transparent image from the ...


11

I've never seen image lazy loading have any negative impact on web search rankings. Improving the perceived performance of your site for users can really help your rankings. When fewer people bounce back to the search results because of performance problems with your site, your rankings will improve. Google will not be able to index lazy loaded images for ...


11

You can indicate to Google which image you'd like used for your property using Schema.org markup. Here's a quick company website example: <script type="application/ld+json"> {"@context" : "http://schema.org", "@type" : "Organization", "name" : "Example Company", "url" : "https://www.example.org", "logo": "https://www.example.org/images/my-...


10

Yes, the ALTernate attribute acts as 'anchor text' for links that contain images. A recent test found both Bing and Google indexed/ranked ALT attribute values: http://www.webmasterworld.com/google/4265397.htm Also, you need to consider that Google operates functionally like the lowest common browsing denominator (like a Lynx browser, or as one SEO put it '...


10

From our (Google's) point of view, you can use whatever file names & URL structure that makes sense for your site -- you definitely do not need to fine-tune it on this level for SEO purposes. For Image Search, we recommend using descriptive file names, but even if it's just a number (for example, when a photographer uploads files without modifying the ...


10

It is perfectly valid for the alt attribute to be blank, if the images are purely decorational. Otherwise, if you are outputting the same image over and over then it makes sense that the alt attribute be the same for all of them. There is no negative SEO benefit to that, and your cross/tick images are unlikely to rank in image searches anyway. One ...


10

First of all, use better alt attributes. Seriously, "Cross" and "Checkmark" are horrible alt attributes. To see why, try viewing your page in a text-only browser. With your HTML as it is, you'll see something like: Unregistered Basic Premium ------------------------------------------------------------------- ...


10

Not at all. A's PageRank is not improved. Links to website A (with <a> tag like <a href="http://www.asite.com"></a>) improve PageRank. Moreover, there is a bad thing for website A because website B uses the bandwidth of website A and thus can slow down the browsing of website A's visitors.


10

Browsers download data in parallel and try to start rendering the page as soon as possible. If you do not specify the size, the browser has no idea how large the image is going to be until after the image download is fully complete. This delay forces the browser to repaint or reflow the layout - delaying the page load time. The more images with this ...


10

Schema.org does not require any properties, so having a BlogPosting without an image property is totally fine. (And, other than omitting the property, there is no way to denote that you don’t have an image.) (I’d even guess that not providing an image would be the norm, as the image property is not for just any image that is contained in the blog post, but ...


10

No, unless you do a search with the correct license. When you do an image search, there is an option to select the license. Go to Images. Enter a search term. You should see a Tools button toward the left side. Click on it. It becomes gray and a set of dropdowns appear toward the right side. Click on Usage Rights and select your expected usage. "Labeled ...


9

The width and height attributes of the img element are not required under any DOCTYPE, if that is what were implying. There is no difference between Strict, Transitional and HTML5 in this respect. As you suggest, these attributes were only 'required' to reserve the space on the page and prevent the page moving around as it loads - which is important. This ...


9

I always create a lib directory for third party components, you really don't want to be changing third party libraries unless it is strictly necessary. Go with the 3rd option.


9

There's nothing saying you can't use JPEG but generally PNG's are better because of several factors: Most page based elements such as tabs and icons compress far Superior than JPEG. PNG is a lossless compression format Jpeg doesn't support transparency (the main issue, most page elements contain the need for transparency). Generally PNG files will compress ...


9

It is valid but highly not recommended, usually there is a structure you should follow to get the most of the SEO juice avaiable and it is : For the alternative text you want to show info for the picture, and for title you want to focus on the content the picture associate to. Example: If you put an image of a local supermarket, the alt would be "...


9

Google likes company alt attribute Both Google and Bing understand that a logo will often be repeated throughout in PNG, GIF and JPEG. Simply markup the logo using the alt description to inform search engines that it is LOGO for your business. A basic example: <img src="logo.png" alt="Company Name Logo"> A Schema example: <div itemscope ...


8

It's not that PNG is better for sprites, it's that PNG is better for the types of images people normally use sprites for (buttons, icons etc.). You can use any web-suitable image format for sprites. Imagine you have a staff page on your company website that lists 10 or so staff members with a small photo alongside each one. If you wanted to speed up this ...


8

Your example [http://example.com/image.jpg] is correct. You will need to enable this by setting $wgAllowExternalImages to true in your configuration file. The default is false. Optionally, you can set $wgAllowExternalImagesFrom to allow exceptions while $wgAllowExternalImages remains set to false. You can also use $wgEnableImageWhitelist to allow exceptions ...


8

There is no use of title for image in terms of SEO. It is only used for providing extra information for that image element. You can increase the SEO by adding ALT tag to your Images.


7

Large sites move their static content (images, JS & CSS files) to a Content Delivery Network or CDN as deploying your content across multiple, geographically dispersed servers will make your pages load faster from the user's perspective. As the CDN has a different domain name, it also provides domain sharding benefits.


7

If they are different views for the same product they should have a custom alt attribute that describes what the image shows. After all, that is the purpose of the alt attribute. So one showing the back of the product could say, "Rear view of the Blaster 3000". A close up of a part of it could say, "Big red shiny button on the side of the Blaster 3000". ...


7

One commonly used solution is to make your image URLs look something like this: http://www.example.com/path/to/images/1.jpg?v=123456 Here, /path/to/images/1.jpg is the actual URL path of the image, while ?v=123456 is just a dummy query staring tacked onto the end of the URL. The query string can be anything — a version number, a timestamp, a hash of ...


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