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59

What can one do in such a situation to recover control over the domain? Domain registration statuses akin to "Client Transfer Prohibited" displayed in a WHOIS record simply mean the domain is locked to protect against unauthorized changes at the registrar level. The first step is for the registrant to unlock the domain with the current registrar, who's ...


6

There are two commonly-used methods of maintaining privacy in domain registrations: Privacy services offered by the registrar. These services are independent of ICANN but regulated by them through policy. ICANN does require that registrars send private registration data to the shared registry, meaning that ICANN has access to that data, but they only reveal ...


6

Why do the details not show by default This is because of the GDPR, which brought in a lot of personal data protections, and resulted in a large amount of changes to WHOIS, in order to try to make it compliant. How do I get my details shown If you want your details to show, you need to provide authorization for this, which you can find more information ...


6

Initially you didn't say what TLD domain you are talking about, but they are likely similar. [UPDATE] Chris.leonard's answer gives more depth on that issue. [/UPDATE] ICANN states the following: In the 2013 RAA, the Admin, Tech, and Registrant telephone numbers are each required to be present. https://whois.icann.org/en/whoisars-validation-telephone ...


5

Google's John Mueller (who also contributes on this site) has said that private registration won't hurt your rankings. He cautions that using private registration would make it harder for Google to contact you if there is a problem with your site. (So maybe you should sign up for Google Webmaster Tools.) There are also reports from webmasters that use ...


5

The short answer is that Cloudflare is safe. Cloudflare is essentially nothing more than a content delivery network (CDN). The theory behind it is that they will cache copies of your website to their servers, which are spread across different locations. When a visitor visits your site the server that is closest to them is chosen and the connection has less ...


5

Just wait until May 25 and then use a registrar in the EU. The new GDPR rules will prohibit making personal information publicly available with whois. See here, for example.


5

This is just an addendum to Steve's excellent answer, in case anyone sees this and wonders if Steve's answer is applicable to all TLDs mentioned in the revised question (COM, NET and ORG). There are two types of TLDs - global TLDs (gTLDs) and country code TLDs (ccTLDs like .US for the USA or .CN for China). ICANN rules govern gTLDs only. COM, NET, and ORG ...


4

The new registrar will send an "approval request" (that is what GoDaddy calls it) to your previous (current at the time) registrar. Here is the important part. If the privacy service of the previous (current at the time) registrar forwards the "approval request" then you will probably be able to do the transfer without disabling privacy. Many privacy ...


4

UPDATE: Based on the fact this is is a .com domain, you can do the following: Go to https://www.verisigninc.com/en_US/domain-names/com-domain-names/index.xhtml. Click on the Chat with Support link at the bottom of the page. Explain the situation to them and tell them what documentation, if any, you have to establish that you or your client is the rightful ...


4

With regards to displaying email addresses, it is worth considering methods to prevent their being easily harvested for spamming. The email address I use only for WHOIS records on my domains receives thousands of spam emails a day, mostly from free email accounts (e.g. gmail and similar) with people saying they can help design my website or improve my SEO ...


3

Simple answer, you can't reveal that data - it's protected and hidden by the registrar of the domain because the person has opt or paid for privacy. You can only obtain those details by issuing a complaint letter on grounds of copyright i.e DCMA or a legal complaint of another nature. Or you believe the data may be inaccurate which is doubtful because you ...


3

The dot PRO domain names have tighter rules compared to the likes of .com, .org, .net. currently and most likely indefinite you can not use private whois information on any PRO domain names from any Registrars. This is set by Afilias and makes sense because entities are validated by government certification which is periodically checked against whois data. I ...


3

"Do they ultimately own my domain? Are they able to take away control of my domain?" No, because CloudFlare is not a registrar. The only thing you are changing is the authoritative nameservers for the domain. None of the information changes in whois outside of our nameservers showing. Including some other helpful tips if you're signing up.


3

whois is a very poorly defined protocol (or more precisely: defined well enough at the moment it went into use, but now clearly outdated and missing key elements needed today, like tiered access and formatted output), with only RFC 3912 covering it (obsoleting RFC 954), which says mostly nothing: you send a query on one line, the server replies with a blob ...


3

Let me see. No site. Not found in a search engine. Yet score is 69%. Huh. Something does not add up. That is because these sites are junk. Do not pay attention to this non-sense. Not from any site. In the example you cited, they are just attempting to score the on-page optimization of the home page. Since you do not have one, this score would be misleading....


3

Your domain is currently in pendingDelete + redemptionPeriod state. You can learn more about these state at the ICANN site: pendingDelete This status code may be mixed with redemptionPeriod or pendingRestore. In such case, depending on the status (i.e. redemptionPeriod or pendingRestore) set in the domain name, the corresponding description presented ...


3

ICANN requirements passed along registries, registrars and finally the registrant are that you can be contacted at the address given, in the (honestly never occuring) case someone sends you a letter there. If your address accepts mail for you that you can collect, you fulfill the requirements. See https://www.icann.org/resources/pages/faqs-f0-2012-02-25-en ...


3

There are domain registry services that allow for free private whois information. One of the registrars that I use doesn't charge me anything extra for private whois. One of the other registrars that I use charges me an arm and a leg for private whois. I think it's largely dependent on which registrar you go with, as their pricing breakdown is most often ...


3

For domain name history, you can use this tool: https://who.is/domain-history/cnn.com. domaintools.com is better, but paid. PErhaps you can do a trial. Other than that, you can look up the site on archive.org (wayback machine) and scroll through years and months to see their content quality, extended breaks in archives, and if it was redirected.


3

It is impossible. The registries manage the data. What wou see through whois is just a read-only view of part of their database. So it is not specifically whois that is relevant here, but just the registries' data and their handling of it. When a registry receive a domain registration order (typically from a registrar) it will then create a new record in ...


3

It depends, on the TLD. For gTLDs, you can use ICANN CZDS which is a service giving you access to (almost) all gTLD registries zonefiles, updated once per day. The zonefiles will contain all domain names published (caveat: not all domain names registered are published, voluntarily or not; the difference in amount should be small though, a few percentages), ...


2

Since it hasn't been mentioned so far: At least EU citizens are protected by GDPR. From an article on TNW: If you order from the UK or any other EU country, you are not required to pay to make your data private in the WHOIS database.


2

You can try Whois History API The API/service allows you to view domains ownership information from the past 10 years, backed by 10 billion whois records, 300+ million active domains, 1 billion historic domains with thousands of tlds tracked.


2

while no useful direct contact info was given, there was enough there for me to do some searching on the web and find some other ways to contact the guy. Firstly, since you were able to obtain the information by other means, the message from the Registrar's WHOIS lookup server would not be applicable. In fact, this message really only pertains to use ...


2

This is the key phrase: mass ... advertising or solicitations You can try to contact them.


2

Your situation is an odd one and your question more than intriguing. I imagine that this question can be helpful because this would be a really confusing situation to anyone. I do this everyday and it eluded me even though there were hints right in the question that were easy to overlook. When you use nslookup or whois, it is possible that the data returned ...


2

You seem to be talking about the right to be forgotten which exists only in some countries in Europe and only applies to sites within that jurisdiction. For that I do not know. As for the rest of the world, this is not a right and any request would be up to the discretion of the site owner. If you have a compelling case, and there are some, then I could see ...


2

It's not always possible, for example GoDaddy prevents transfers away from them without disabling the privacy protection first (docs): You can't transfer your domain [...] if your domain has Ownership Protection. There's also a "helpful" message about this when you turn it off: Turning off privacy exposes your contact info to the public. Once it's out ...


2

You are checking your DNS records by using Who.is. A big problem with this is that Who.is does not always perform a Whois lookup or DNS record check live, in real time. They also appear to cache Whois data and DNS data for an unspecified amount of time. To check your DNS records in real time, you'd want to use dig from the command prompt (if you have this ...


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