166

ICANN lists a set of qualifications that registrars must be able to perform. Among these are: Capabilities for registration and transfer of domains Requirements for security and scalability Backups 5 employees Carry insurance Have cash in the bank ICANN maintains a list of hundreds of accredited registars. All these registrars have to compete with each ...


130

A other answers have said, large portion of your money goes to Verisign. Verisign is essentially government sponsored monopoly over .com and .net domains. You may ask how did that happened when US supposed to so despise monopolies? Here's how: Early on registries were free, funded by government and run by InterNIC. Then the government decided to privatize ...


59

ICANN and your registrar are not the only parties involved. There is also the registry, the organization contracted by ICANN to operate the TLD in question. The bulk of the revenue is actually going to them. The .biz, .info and .org registries, for example, all charge over $8. Verisign, who operates several major TLDs, was famously forced to stop increasing ....


57

What can one do in such a situation to recover control over the domain? Domain registration statuses akin to "Client Transfer Prohibited" displayed in a WHOIS record simply mean the domain is locked to protect against unauthorized changes at the registrar level. The first step is for the registrant to unlock the domain with the current registrar, who's ...


43

The site you saw is run by Public-Root, one of the many alternative root zone operators. These are essentially rogue organizations that create/sell custom TLDs that aren't sanctioned or recognized by ICANN and only exist on their own private root DNS servers. So, technically, they're right, you can buy a custom TLD from them for $1000. The only problem is ...


37

I just want to add a note of caution. You say only that the ex-employee is refusing to hand over the login details for his account with a domain registrar. That's completely reasonable. It doesn't necessarily matter that this specific domain's WHOIS is labelled with his email address at your company; that doesn't automatically mean that his account with ...


31

Bypass the registrar when searching for available domains by querying the registry directly. Buy the domain you want as soon as you know it's available. Use a registrar who doesn't have a history of pinching unregistered names of value when you try to register them. To bypass the registrar when doing searches: From "How To Keep Your Domain Name Searches ...


27

Answering your questions in a logical order: Google probably paid $10/year for their domain name. Yes, it's probably a similar price. You own your domain name. If your registrar said "it's going to cost you $1000 to renew" then they will go out of business, because you can transfer it to someone else who will charge you less. (Transferring around the time ...


27

If john.doe@somecompany.co.za is on your company domain, then you should be able to access those emails and have a password reset by the registrar. You can then log in and transfer back to a generic company account and manage it that way. If you don't have control over that domain's emails then you'll need to contact the registrar and ask them to help. ...


22

It does appear that ICANN will be allowing you to purchase your own TLD, but I would be incredibly skeptical of any company offering to sell you one - especially right now. It looks like ICANN will start taking applications on Wednesday, Jan. 12th (tomorrow, on the date of this answer) and will be accepting applications up until April. I have not been able ...


18

No, it will not affect the final letter case format of your domain whatever letter case you choose while registering it. The Domain Name System (DNS) names is case insensitive and you can not manipulate this by any mean when you register it or even define it to search engines for "good looking" purposes. All cases (upper and lower) will be accepted when ...


17

This seems to be quite a common occurance with small businesses and cowboy web developers. If he bought the domain while employed for the company it is almost certainly their property even if he used his own details. Taking an asset of a company is covered by many laws relating to IP and/or theft although the specifics depend on your locality. In my ...


13

By default, many authorities restrict the use of 1- or 2-letter domains for special uses (for states, organisations). The most frequent regulation appears to be a 3-letter minimum. And - to be sure - for .com and .net and the like it is probably too late: They are all taken or available only at a very high price (6 or 7 figures). But some authorities (of ...


13

This Image will help you on domain process of preregistration and renewal See more : https://www.icann.org/resources/pages/gtld-lifecycle-2012-02-25-en


12

There are at least 3 ways: Links to your site. Using Google Webmaster Tools (now called Search Console) Registrar dumps, triggers, and other options. Google will find many new sites quickly from some registrars. For example, Google found one domain name I registered using GoDaddy, indexed it, and began sending search results within 20 minutes of ...


12

The only exception to the answer by paulmorriss is that some hosting companies actually register themselves as owner of the domain and let you use it. Did you register your domain name yourself? with a reputable company? If your domain name was part of a domain name/hosting/email bundle you might want to read your contract. Have read of stories when ...


12

You can host a website on a home system, if you like. There is a caveat, though. Some Internet Service Providers (ISPs) don't allow their customers to host their own servers, while others will allow you to do so. An ISP that doesn't allow home users to host their own servers may block traffic on the ports commonly used by servers. E.g., it can stop someone ...


11

http://www.nic.sh/registrars.html


11

While it is not necessarily needed to add both the www and non-www versions of your domain for webmaster tools to work; it's a best practice to add them both and then set you're preferred domain (www or non-www) under Configuration > Settings. It's also a good idea to use the canonical tag in your site to bolster you're preferred domain settings.


11

Not disclosing your personal contact information is a common concern, since as you state, it's otherwise publicly available at domain registrars, and any site that implements WHOIS lookups. There are Domain Privacy options available at most domain registrars however, for example: Private Registration These will prevent the public from seeing your home ...


11

Kim Dot Com was a German operating servers in New Zealand and yet the FBI still raided him. Despite the raid being deemed entirely illegal in hindsight, that data and business was destroyed regardless. Basically you can not avoid the US claiming jurisdiction wherever they please unless you work in countries like China because the US has no regard for ...


11

ICANN doesn't register domain names Your question assumes that the amount ICANN charges is a 'registration fee' and that you (or anyone else for that matter) can register "directly from ICANN" - which is simply not true. Think of it as a small tax - for each TLD there is a registry that handles the actual registration, but to support the top-level ...


10

There is no way around this. If you want to use godaddy as your registrar that's the price you have to pay for private registration. If you can get a domain name with private registration cheaper elsewhere, and cost is an issue to you then register your domain at the cheaper registrar. From this question asked previously about entering fake information ...


10

The Process: The exact drop time varies by registry - from 30 to 60 days. It can take up to 75 days for the domain to actually drop. Contact the registrar to find out what their hold time is. The domain will stay in pendingDelete for about 5 days. There is no set time for when a domain is dropped, though it does appear to start in the 11am-2pm PST (2pm - ...


10

It is possible for a company with a trademark dispute to take you to court over this, however I would not worry too much about it. They have to make a substantial claim that you have somehow violated their trademark with your given name ("trademarked" whenever you were issued an birth certificate, I would imagine). It's not like you were named "Google" or "...


9

Here is the of generic Top Level Domain life cycle from ICANN: So, it is typically 30 + 5 days. However as they state: Some registrar activity post-expiration may not be reflected in the life cycle chart above. Thus, I guess, it's not strictly defined.


9

Generally considered bad for SEO due to Geotargeting, Google search about ccTLD since .in is not a generic domain, additionally you should find this information useful: A warning to ccTLDS: Domain hacks is a popular reason for choosing ccTLDs, combining the domain name with certain ccTLDs to spell out the full name of the website, i.e. goo.gl, fold....


9

I suggest that you use your existing email while registering a domain name. When you complete the domain registration process, most domain providers send domain info, account activation links, invoice & billing info to email address which you put in during registration. Once you create account and register domain then you can easily create new email ...


8

Falsifying the information would give them grounds to revoke the domain. You must meet the "Canadian Presence Requirements" to own a .CA domain. There are ways of legally buying a .CA domain without being a citizen of Canada though. Linked is a full list, some of the exclusions in the list being: Official marks registered in Canada Trade-mark registered in ...


8

Generally the autoRenewPeriod lasts up to 45 days. During this time the original registrant can renew the domain. If, by the end of the autoRenewPeriod, the domain has not been renewed and you are the only person who has placed a back order then you should stand a good chance of getting the domain. If, however, there are others who have also back ordered ...


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