168

ICANN lists a set of qualifications that registrars must be able to perform. Among these are: Capabilities for registration and transfer of domains Requirements for security and scalability Backups 5 employees Carry insurance Have cash in the bank ICANN maintains a list of hundreds of accredited registars. All these registrars have to compete with each ...


131

As other answers have said, large portion of your money goes to Verisign. Verisign is essentially government sponsored monopoly over .com and .net domains. You may ask how did that happened when US supposed to so despise monopolies? Here's how: Early on registries were free, funded by government and run by InterNIC. Then the government decided to privatize ...


60

ICANN and your registrar are not the only parties involved. There is also the registry, the organization contracted by ICANN to operate the TLD in question. The bulk of the revenue is actually going to them. The .biz, .info and .org registries, for example, all charge over $8. Verisign, who operates several major TLDs, was famously forced to stop increasing ....


59

What can one do in such a situation to recover control over the domain? Domain registration statuses akin to "Client Transfer Prohibited" displayed in a WHOIS record simply mean the domain is locked to protect against unauthorized changes at the registrar level. The first step is for the registrant to unlock the domain with the current registrar, who's ...


37

I just want to add a note of caution. You say only that the ex-employee is refusing to hand over the login details for his account with a domain registrar. That's completely reasonable. It doesn't necessarily matter that this specific domain's WHOIS is labelled with his email address at your company; that doesn't automatically mean that his account with ...


27

If john.doe@somecompany.co.za is on your company domain, then you should be able to access those emails and have a password reset by the registrar. You can then log in and transfer back to a generic company account and manage it that way. If you don't have control over that domain's emails then you'll need to contact the registrar and ask them to help. ...


18

No, it will not affect the final letter case format of your domain whatever letter case you choose while registering it. The Domain Name System (DNS) names is case insensitive and you can not manipulate this by any mean when you register it or even define it to search engines for "good looking" purposes. All cases (upper and lower) will be accepted when ...


17

This seems to be quite a common occurance with small businesses and cowboy web developers. If he bought the domain while employed for the company it is almost certainly their property even if he used his own details. Taking an asset of a company is covered by many laws relating to IP and/or theft although the specifics depend on your locality. In my ...


15

This Image will help you on domain process of preregistration and renewal See more : https://www.icann.org/resources/pages/gtld-lifecycle-2012-02-25-en


13

There are at least 3 ways: Links to your site. Using Google Webmaster Tools (now called Search Console) Registrar dumps, triggers, and other options. Google will find many new sites quickly from some registrars. For example, Google found one domain name I registered using GoDaddy, indexed it, and began sending search results within 20 minutes of ...


12

You can host a website on a home system, if you like. There is a caveat, though. Some Internet Service Providers (ISPs) don't allow their customers to host their own servers, while others will allow you to do so. An ISP that doesn't allow home users to host their own servers may block traffic on the ports commonly used by servers. E.g., it can stop someone ...


11

Not disclosing your personal contact information is a common concern, since as you state, it's otherwise publicly available at domain registrars, and any site that implements WHOIS lookups. There are Domain Privacy options available at most domain registrars however, for example: Private Registration These will prevent the public from seeing your home ...


11

Kim Dot Com was a German operating servers in New Zealand and yet the FBI still raided him. Despite the raid being deemed entirely illegal in hindsight, that data and business was destroyed regardless. Basically you can not avoid the US claiming jurisdiction wherever they please unless you work in countries like China because the US has no regard for ...


11

ICANN doesn't register domain names Your question assumes that the amount ICANN charges is a 'registration fee' and that you (or anyone else for that matter) can register "directly from ICANN" - which is simply not true. Think of it as a small tax - for each TLD there is a registry that handles the actual registration, but to support the top-level ...


11

The Process: The exact drop time varies by registry - from 30 to 60 days. It can take up to 75 days for the domain to actually drop. Contact the registrar to find out what their hold time is. The domain will stay in pendingDelete for about 5 days. There is no set time for when a domain is dropped, though it does appear to start in the 11am-2pm PST (2pm - ...


10

It is possible for a company with a trademark dispute to take you to court over this, however I would not worry too much about it. They have to make a substantial claim that you have somehow violated their trademark with your given name ("trademarked" whenever you were issued an birth certificate, I would imagine). It's not like you were named &...


9

Here is the of generic Top Level Domain life cycle from ICANN: So, it is typically 30 + 5 days. However as they state: Some registrar activity post-expiration may not be reflected in the life cycle chart above. Thus, I guess, it's not strictly defined.


9

Generally considered bad for SEO due to Geotargeting, Google search about ccTLD since .in is not a generic domain, additionally you should find this information useful: A warning to ccTLDS: Domain hacks is a popular reason for choosing ccTLDs, combining the domain name with certain ccTLDs to spell out the full name of the website, i.e. goo.gl, fold....


9

Matt Cutt, an engineer at Google, was asked the following question regarding domain registration length's effect on SEO and search results: How much weight does the number of years a domain is registered for have on your ranking? This was Matt's response (bold emphasis mine): My short answer is not to worry about that very much. Not very much at all, ...


9

I suggest that you use your existing email while registering a domain name. When you complete the domain registration process, most domain providers send domain info, account activation links, invoice & billing info to email address which you put in during registration. Once you create account and register domain then you can easily create new email ...


8

Generally the autoRenewPeriod lasts up to 45 days. During this time the original registrant can renew the domain. If, by the end of the autoRenewPeriod, the domain has not been renewed and you are the only person who has placed a back order then you should stand a good chance of getting the domain. If, however, there are others who have also back ordered ...


8

Whilst DNS itself is case-insensitive, at least one search engine allows you to declare preferred case in search results: Yandex. The Case of the site name tool lets you set preferred capitalisation in certain cases. This can be accessed in Yandex.Webmaster under Appearance in search results > URL letter case. I've set this for a few of my sites and it's ...


8

According to Judge William A. Fletcher's opinion on Office Depot v. Zuccarini, the jurisdiction over a domain name is dependant on the jurisdiction of the domain name registry. The registry for .com domains is VeriSign, which is headquartered in Virginia, USA. Assuming that the judge's opinion is still applicable, this means the jurisdiction of .com domain ...


8

Most people choose to pay for hosting for multiple reasons. Site availability: A personal computer isn't really built for serving a website to however many visitors you would get. Most people turn their PCs off from time to time, and most people have limited bandwidth for their internet connection. So, if your site suddenly got popular, most people's ...


7

You're actually wrong that they aren't accepted; they're just not available to you. The ultimate answer is probably along the lines of "those are the rules and you have to deal with it" but at least one likely reason is that it keeps room open for things like locality-based domains. This appears to be the relevant bit of documentation laying out the naming ...


7

As a former domain registrar (so no, not selling) and as a not too helpful answer, the only information available on Eritrean domains that I would trust comes from the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA). Both IANA and the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) list the registry for .er as being run by EriTel - but their website does not appear ...


7

This website: https://pointless.net/ Is dnssec signed and uses a TLSA record (RFC6698) to secure the SSL certificate (Which is also signed by CA CERT, a sort of open source web of trust CA). I run my own nameservers and use Easydns as my registrar - however Easydns doesn't support putting a DS record in the .net zone so I use the ISC Domain Lookaside ...


7

Simple answer. At the end of the 10 year period, you can renew your registration again. There are domain names far older than 10 years including nearly all of mine, Google, MSN, and so forth. The 10 year limit does not mean that you lose your domain name. It means that any registration period can only be as long as 10 years at a time.


7

Register Compass has details about the pending delete status. Their information concurs with what you have read. The deletion period lasts only 5 days. On the last day of this period, typically between 11am and 2pm Pacific Time that domain name will be completely dropped from the ICANN database. Once this happens anyone is free to register that domain ...


7

According to Wikipedia: Generally open for Iranians and non-Iranians; 3rd-level registrations under subdomains have varied restrictions and are restricted to Iranian-related entities There are no law preventing the registration of foreign TLDs including those assigned to Iran.


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