3

This is quite doable. XAMPP should work fine for this. The biggest gotchas will be converting any code that does not use relative addressing to work with a domain and HTTPS. You can likely get closer to your goal by using the hosts file on your computer to create a domain name (but only have it work on computers with a modified hosts file) WordPress is a ...


3

If you were to limit just the Contact Us page to users from the US, this should not have a major impact on your SEO. You run into the issue of Google possibly not indexing the Contact Us page if it is not crawlable outside of the US.


2

Keep reporting them but try not to spend too much time on it. Make sure you add copyrights to your content. There are plugins that can stop copy and paste behavior, and if they are using your RSS feed, change it to an excerpt. Copyscape, Cloudflare, and I am sure there are several other services that help protect your content and intellectual property.


2

This can be done, for example, with an external tool like https://httpstatus.io/. just enter the URL you want to start with. The result will then show you whether the page could be opened directly with a 2xx code, or whether there are one or more redirects (301) in between. It is common, for example, that the request for www.example.com is redirected to ...


1

It is quite trivial do do so. The simplest way is just to pretend you have a domain by adding it to your internal network. If you only develop on one computer, then just change the hosts (/etc/hosts on Unix) file to point a name to your local computer's IP address (Done this dozens of time, it is that simple!) Then you just develop normally using the name ...


1

Absolutely. For doing everything on your computer (or locally), I recommend Local by Flywheel. While the other answers (XAMPP, Docker) work great, I think Local by Flywheel greatly simplifies the process of setting up a local environment much better. It sets up a WordPress site with a domain name that can only be accessed thru the computer it is installed in....


1

You can also use WordPress in Docker for a quick local setup, or to use on a container-based environment, like Netlify who are free for small projects. Here is a feature about using WordPress on Netlify: https://www.netlify.com/with/wordpress/ Using a docker-compose.yml based on the quickstart instructions, you can install and connect two local servers, an ...


1

I had this problem. Some sc###ag was my DNS for their server, there was a real danger visitors might attempt to sign in or sign up. I added the following NGINX rule, right at the bottom of the server section. The rule checks to ensure that the domain making the request is "my" domain - if it's not then it redirect the user to the correct domain. ...


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