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69

From here It's a little-known fact, but fully-qualified (unambiguous) DNS domain names have a dot at the end. People running DNS servers usually know this (if you miss the trailing dots out, your DNS configuration is unlikely to work) but the general public usually doesn't. A domain name that doesn't have a dot at the end is not fully-qualified ...


62

.google actually is a valid top level domain (or top level zone), as is '.youtube'. Google applied for those TLDs a long time ago... successfully as we can now see. Google can now further delegate authority within that zone and com.google and other subdomains (or delegated zones) can become valid and be operated. Here's a news article on zdnet about this ...


51

Hostnames without a trailing dot are potentially ambiguous. A trailing dot means that the hostname is fully qualified and may not be relative to the local search domain. Imagine you are a student of the (fictive) Example University which has the second-level domain example.edu. Inside the university's campus network you can omit the .example.edu suffix for ...


39

I think I found my answer. So, the thing is, because I bought a shared hosting package, they also gave me a shared IP. My guess is, this IP has many websites next to mine and they're all accessible with this same shared IP address. The trick is the HTTP GET request's Host header! When I entered the shared IP directly in the address bar, the Host header ...


38

I'm not sure of the term but it's similar to coming out with a soda and calling it Koka-Kola and hoping you can get away with it. You won't. If you are going to compete, compete with superior products and service instead of trickery.


37

It took me a while, but I figured this one out. It's a 2 step process (maybe there are other ways to do it, but this works for AWS, too): 1) Use a CNAME record to set your www.example.com to forward to the true hostname. 2) To configure the naked domain, add a "Synthetic Record", and set up a "Subdomain Forward." In the subdomain text box, enter the @ sign ...


34

The 'green box' in the Chrome address bar isn't anything to do with verification by Google - as Stephen alluded to in the comments on your question, it's an indication that your site has an Extended Verification (EV) security certificate. This is generally a 'premium' SSL product offered by many SSL certificate providers. To get one of these certificates, ...


30

As Tim Malone said, this is a special type of SSL certificate that is usually sold at a premium by certificate authorities. The going rate is usually at least a couple of hundred dollars. What Tim did not mention, and part of the reason for the elevated price, is that there is a certain amount of paperwork involved that has to be submitted to and checked by ...


28

UX Importance User Experience also known as UX remains one of the most important factors when managing and operating a website. User experience enhances your conversions, increases time spent on page and indirectly improves rankings due to an increase of people wanting to link to your website. Having a site not accessible via both with or without www ...


27

I have tried this solution http://lowendtalk.com/discussion/19043/how-to-set-up-email-forwarding-for-your-domain-using-mailgun So far, it seems to work for me even though my domain is still not yet verified. (Still in the early 24-48 hours to verify the MX records etc) Basically the solution is to use mailgun and setup the email forwarding using their ...


27

I don't bother with a "coming soon" page for a domain. It won't help SEO Search engines don't typically index coming soon pages, and even if they did, the coming soon page would only rank for the name of the website. No real progress on SEO can be made until there is actual content that contains keywords. It could hurt SEO if you put on keywords ...


26

In gTLD world, such as .COM it goes around like that: when a domain hits its expiration date, the registry auto-renews it this opens a 45 days period where the registrar can decide either to do nothing (then the domain gets really renewed past the 45 days delay, which means the registrar has been payed by its client to renew it), or delete the domain name (...


23

A coming soon page is slightly better. This is based on the assumption that the url will be checked out wether or not you promoted it. This page allows you to inform the user with whatever you want to tell them and tell them that something is going on, instead of serving them some harsh cold page: If you know a date, you could share that date, possible ...


23

First, as already pointed out, it's trickery and unlikely to serve you well. Someone typing in a specific domain name knows what site they want, and it isn't yours; how do you suppose they'll react to being duped? I certainly can't imagine it'll be a positive reflection on your business. And do enough people actually type a URL into the address bar to ...


23

This is a known "scam". This is a legitimate, though questionable approach. Big chance there isn't actually anyone trying to register it, they just tell you that to add time pressure. They do nothing wrong with offering it to (and if they're not offering it now, they will be in their follow up mail). They often simply do [your_domain].[some less common ...


22

I've been on the other end of this scenario. It was a couple of years ago, but I can't imagine much has changed. We held the trademark on the domain name—let's say we were ExtraSpecialVeeblefetzers.com, so a competitor opened up ExtraSpecialVeeblefetzers.co.uk. So I dashed off a letter that we were going to file a complaint, not with the trademark office, ...


19

The How... In the past few years icann opened up applications for custom GTLD names, you can take a look at application statuses on the ICANN website. Expect to see many new company names as gTLD in the next few years such as .bbc,.foodnetwork,.hilton etc. Sadly these scheme was only for the super rich or big corps with buckets filled with 100 dollar bills. ...


19

Couldn't anyone do this? You are missing one factor. Domain name registration and hosting are two different things even if your host will register your domain for you. A domain name has to be registered and pointed to an IP address before the domain name does anything. The hosting company does not generally care about the domain name registration except to ...


18

No, it will not affect the final letter case format of your domain whatever letter case you choose while registering it. The Domain Name System (DNS) names is case insensitive and you can not manipulate this by any mean when you register it or even define it to search engines for "good looking" purposes. All cases (upper and lower) will be accepted when ...


17

The simplest thing to do is employ a dead man's switch that sends vital information to someone that you trust, and have established an agreement with to carry on or conclude a select few of your affairs or ventures if something should render you unable to continue with them. In the simplest case, you have something set up to send an email to several people ...


16

It will remain fr.somewhere.com unless you have rewrite conditions configured correctly: RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} =fr.somewhere.com RewriteRule ^(.*)$ http://www.somewhere.com/$1 [R=permanent,L] I have a cname record created for blog.legoservices.com which just points to tumblr, but all you see is blog.legoservices.com.


16

Here is a Guardlex article that claims that it is to prevent domain hijacking: Once a hijacking has been discovered, the responses to it tend to vary. The registrar is sometimes able to return the registration to its original state. However, if the domain name was transferred to a different registrar, this can prove to be difficult. This is especially ...


15

This is related to how the new TLD are administered. Old TLDs can be administered by several parties (.com, .org, .net, .biz, etc . . .) so there is competition in the field because it was viewed as a monopoly when first setup (those TLDs started at $50 back in the day through Network Solutions.) The new rights to .anythinggoes are purchased by a single ...


15

It is almost impossible completely "lock up a brand" by buying it for every top level domain. There are hundreds of top level domains with new ones coming online all the time. Only well funded companies have enough money to spend on that. I have traditionally purchased the .com, .org and .net together. But at this point I'm questioning the necessity of ...


15

I think this question deserves a bit more background... There's different types of SSL/TLS certificates that can be issued by a Certificate Authority (CA), who basically acts like a notary, certifying that the domain you're accessing, is really the real site, and you're accessing it securely. When you access a site that uses HTTPS, the site's server will ...


14

This Image will help you on domain process of preregistration and renewal See more : https://www.icann.org/resources/pages/gtld-lifecycle-2012-02-25-en


14

You really do need to have the www. sub-domain point to your website. It is particularly important for type in traffic. If you tell a person to visit example.com, a large number of them will add a www. In my experience it is 40% or more that do this. I myself tend to like naked domains with no subdomain when creating a website. I have occasionally ...


14

Normally, you do not need any server just to view raw HTML files, even if they reference other files, CSS and JavaScript. Simply double click on any file and it will open with the default browser of your machine from the local file system. However you may need to check if your static content has no absolute references to other files or other resources (<...


14

From a technical standpoint, it's possible, and there are some examples: http://ai./ http://to./ http://uz./ These are country code TLDs, but the point is that DNS as a technology does support "dotless" domains. However, it appears that most generic TLDs are not allowed to have them due to ICANN polices. According to RFC 7085 such restrictions only apply ...


14

Indeed you can. For instance some do not realize a www. url is an actual sub-domain. So it is happening all the time. You can go to your server settings and choose your sub-domain as the main domain name or add some code to create a redirect. Many people use Apache servers for hosting websites and when you have used a domain name with traffic to it, a ...


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