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57

What can one do in such a situation to recover control over the domain? Domain registration statuses akin to "Client Transfer Prohibited" displayed in a WHOIS record simply mean the domain is locked to protect against unauthorized changes at the registrar level. The first step is for the registrant to unlock the domain with the current registrar, who's ...


32

Bypass the registrar when searching for available domains by querying the registry directly. Buy the domain you want as soon as you know it's available. Use a registrar who doesn't have a history of pinching unregistered names of value when you try to register them. To bypass the registrar when doing searches: From "How To Keep Your Domain Name Searches ...


11

Not disclosing your personal contact information is a common concern, since as you state, it's otherwise publicly available at domain registrars, and any site that implements WHOIS lookups. There are Domain Privacy options available at most domain registrars however, for example: Private Registration These will prevent the public from seeing your home ...


9

I suggest that you use your existing email while registering a domain name. When you complete the domain registration process, most domain providers send domain info, account activation links, invoice & billing info to email address which you put in during registration. Once you create account and register domain then you can easily create new email ...


8

It won't be any faster if the two are served by the same company. There are no opportunity for synergies between the domain registration, DNS, and web services. They don't use the same protocols, they don't use the same ports, they don't use the same types of servers. There isn't going to be an opportunity for any type of caching or reuse between the two....


7

SLaks is correct, Google is not a registrar, but namecheap.com, hover.com and networksolutions.com are all registrars you could look into transferring for domain to. Here is a blog post on how to transfer from godaddy to namecheap.com: blog.jeffepstein.me To setup a Google Apps go to https://www.google.com/a to setup your account. There is a little step by ...


7

This website: https://pointless.net/ Is dnssec signed and uses a TLSA record (RFC6698) to secure the SSL certificate (Which is also signed by CA CERT, a sort of open source web of trust CA). I run my own nameservers and use Easydns as my registrar - however Easydns doesn't support putting a DS record in the .net zone so I use the ISC Domain Lookaside ...


7

No, it doesn't matter. Registrars are only bureaucratic entities that "give" you the name you requested, record your information and associate it with the domain name. Once you have the domain name, you have to host it somewhere, and that physical location is the one that may affect.


7

It depends on the registrar. Typically the price will be similar or a little more than the new registration or transfer rate. Most registrars also provide a pricing table for the 3 common actions - Create/Register, Renew and Transfer To find the lowest price, you can visit http://domcomp.com. Search for the domain extension/TLD for your domain and check the ...


6

This is a classic domain registrar scam. Don't buy them. First off, unless you're operating in China/Taiwan/India, those domains are worthless to you. Secondly, you'll be be encouraging more such scams in the future. What I'd do is try to trick the scammer that you are interested in registering those domains, and see if you can get them to buy all of those ...


6

Is there a chance that a UDRP would be successful or should I swallow my pride and simply ask them for how much they would sell it There's always a chance it will work but the more likely end result is going to be litigation and potentially international litigation (neither of which comes cheap). Unless the small company has deep pockets and legal ...


6

Your domain is locked with the current expire unless cancelled or extended. During transfer the expire date remains unchanged. In this case its 2015+1=2016 if you extend after transfer. Some registers charge transfer fees, some enforce renewals, some don't charge or enforce at all.


6

You can read the domain renewal policy here: http://www.nic.io/renewpolicy.html The domain drops out of expiration and becomes available 90 days after it expires. nic.io also tells you when the domain will drop. For example, the domain 60.io is dropping in a couple of days, which you can see from the WHOIS info on nic.io: http://nic.io/cgi-bin/whois?query=...


6

Short answer: a registrar can register their own domains just like anyone else. Longer answer: Behind the domain name system is a network of registry operators; in the case of gTLDs (global top level domains - eg. com, net, org and many, many others) the registry operator is ICANN. Each registrar (GoDaddy, Namecheap etc.) is accredited by the registry ...


6

I have had the same issue, example.com worked just fine but www.example.com didn't. Turned out that www.example.com needs www in the name value instead of @ for reason unknown, But @ worked for example.com. And I didn't redirect www.example.com to example.com. So currently I have four entries in my godaddy console for my domain, two with @ and two with www....


5

nslookup will find DNS information about the domain name. However, if it's been registered, but doesn't have an DNS information, it won't work, even though the domain does exist. whois is the command you want. It's built into Unix-based operating system or can be downloaded from Microsoft.


5

Is there a domain registrar that offers an API for purchasing domains? Lots. Pick whoever you like, search for "$registrarName API" and there's a decent chance they do: Godaddy Namecheap Gandi Network Solutions, via SRSPlus You'll have to review their terms and such to see if the access, tools, etc they provide match your particular needs, obviously. ...


5

Domain registrars are so similar that the differences come down to: A. Price Price is not necessarily an indicator of registrar quality; it could simply be an indicator of sales volume. It's not wise to assume that a more expensive domain registrar is a better one. It is worth comparing prices, though, especially for multi-year registrations, which can ...


5

When transferring domains to another registrar, to avoid any downtime the things to consider are: Will the web hosting account or server change too: If so, then you'll need to upload all of your content and data there so both match and the new hosting will transparently pick up from your old hosting. Who's DNS servers are you using: Major registrars ...


5

Even without that setting, there are protections against unauthorized domain name transfers. Here are the six steps required to transfer a domain name to a new registrar: Purchase and request domain transfer at the new registrar Request authorization code at current registrar. Authorization code received from current registrar. Begin the transfer from the ...


5

You are not selling a car here. Selling a website is selling immaterial property. You must first specify what you are actually selling. Domain. You can sell a domain as a brand. In itself it doesn't contain more than the domain name. Probably it is best to transfer the domain ownership within same registrar and then let the new owner to change registrar by ...


5

Domain has 30 days renewal from the date after it expired. Then redemption period activates for another 30 days. After the redemption period, you'll be able to register domain again. Redemption period means this: This status code indicates that your registrar has asked the registry to delete your domain. Your domain will be held in this status for 30 days....


5

The physical location of the registrar isn't important, what matters is where their DNS servers are located in relation to your users, and whether they use unicast or anycast for the DNS services. You tend to find that the bigger DNS providers use anycast. This broadcasts the same DNS information to multiple servers located around the Internet. When a ...


5

The first reason is competition. The registrar cannot force you to stay with them and there are tons of registrars. If they charged you 10 times their public price you'd just go to the next one. The second reason is economics. If your domain is famous, you probably need a lot of other stuff : emails, servers, IPs... If they lost all their big customers, ...


5

Why aren't gTLD domains sold in a unified price? Why should they? We live in a world where economy is bound by offers and demands, isn't it? So sellers are free to set their prices, and buyers are free to pay that price or not. And your question could be for all TLDs, not just gTLDs. Domains were free, back in the days, before the world wide web become ...


5

The pricing of a given domain depends on the registry and the registrars. Most registries have the same price for registration and renewal, but especially with new gTLDs, registries sometimes run promotional sales where first-year registration can be significantly cheaper. Also some ccTLDs have different prices, for example .pl costs 10 PLN to register and ...


4

Though we can't suggest you to give false information on registration, you can still get away with it can done finishing registration. But the problem only arises when some body claims your domain and if you want claim your domain in the future if controversy arisies is difficult to prove your ownership of that domain. In major numbers of registrants they ...


4

Basically, what happens when you change your nameservers at your registrar is that they submit the changes to the registry, which keeps a WHOIS database as well as an authoritative nameserver for that TLD. So, in theory, the AS for your TLD is the first to know about the changed nameservers via updated NS records. That is where the DNS propagation begins. ...


4

Personally, I prefer not supporting unethical registrars, and especially registrars like Godaddy that are in bed with domainers and spammers. If I need to worry about a registrar ripping me off by pseudo-frontrunning (since frontrunning is technically illegal now), then I wouldn't take my business to that registrar in the first place. Hence, I just search ...


4

Kenic is in charge of the .ke top level domain. I would contact them using their dispute settlement procedure.


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