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25

Google will automatically remove pages that now return a 404 status. They will get removed 24 hours after Googlebot next tries to crawl them. If you want to speed up the process slightly, return "410 Gone" status for those URLs instead. Then they will be removed without the day grace period after they are next crawled. The only problem is that it ...


18

I can understand the frustration when you don't have access to SSH. Below is a simple PHP script that you save in a file in the root folder from where you want to start your search. For example, I wanted to find all files that have the HEX color code string ecebeb under the ../public_html (or the www) folder. Retracing the steps here. Login to yourdomain/...


17

Google's Matt Cutts has addressed this via video: It’s a fair question. I think we can handle it either way, so we should be able to process it. But if we see a lot of pages or a lot of things ranking on a site all of a sudden, then we might take a look at it from the manual webspam team. So if it doesn’t make any difference whatsoever to you in terms of ...


14

In the root of the directory of the subdomain website, add a file called robots.txt containing: User-agent: * Disallow: / This will tell web crawlers not to index the site at all. They do not have to obey, but the main ones will.


11

Yes, the latter one is better. Yet, if applicable, /john-smith is better than /johnsmith


10

Ironically the answer is on this page and every other Stack Exchange site :) You have to define an OpenSearchDescription for your site. If you look at the source code of this page you will see in the header: <link rel="search" type="application/opensearchdescription+xml" title="Pro Webmasters - Stack Exchange" href="/opensearch.xml"> And if you ...


9

I contacted John Mueller at Google about this issue. He had his team take a look at it and got back to me with the answer. The word "behance" is coming from an SVG image on your page. The image is https://onceuponafoodblog.com/wp-content/plugins/simple-social-icons/symbol-defs.svg and it has a number of <title> elements in its source code, the ...


7

For purposes of this answer I'm assuming you are talking about Google Custom Search/Site Search and not the Google Search Appliance which would be a VERY good idea, albeit an expensive one. Outsourcing your search to Google Custom Search is not a bad idea but it may not be the best fit for your site/business model/whatever due to Google's limitations ...


7

It will take time and enough incoming links with gethis as the anchor text to get Google to assume people want gethis instead of a mistype on the phrase get his. Google is making the assumption that users want get his when that phrase is typed and 99.9999% of the time it is correct. In simple terms your site will have to gain popularity before it is ...


6

Using a robots.txt file in your subdomain will help (and Google will obey this), but another step you can take is to specify with a Google Webmasters account that you don't want this subdomain to be indexed. You can also use a meta tag on all pages in the subdomain: <meta name="robots" content="noindex"> If this happens to be a site that you are ...


5

If you don't mind starting from scratch, giving up all your links, bookmarks, people who remember the url and pagerank then sure you don't need 301 redirects. If you want to keep any of that then you are going to need to keep the old domain running and 301 redirect the important urls to the same pages on the new site. Since importance is based on links to ...


5

This is deliberate. To quote from this post on the Official Google Webmaster Central blog: "Starting in April, for browsers with the appropriate support, we will be using the "referrer" meta tag to automatically simplify the referring URL that is sent by the browser when visiting a page linked from an organic search result. This results in a faster time ...


5

You shouldn't simple add an extra page simply for an additional index, Google cares about quality not just quantity, so if the page offers nothing special and useful for your visitors then you should remove the page, however if the page is helpful then keep it. You should put your visitors first and the search engines last, with this logic its hard to fail.


5

While it may be seen as a different question the answer has largely been dealbt with here Google thinks my domain doesn't exist or is misspelled when users search for it The fastest way to correct this is to make your site the authoritative for your company name. The sooner your site is seen by Google to be the destination for your (misspelled word) ...


5

There are no TLDs that Google finds preferential to others; they are all treated equally in rankings. There are some geo-specific TLDs that Google will default to a specific country and use that as an indicator that the website is more important in a specific geographic region. But all TLDs are treated equally. Google's systems treat new gTLDs like ...


5

Of course it should be possible to use any kind of URL design. It wouldn’t make sense for Google to exclude many sites just because they don’t use the URL’s query component for the search function. Did you check Google’s documentation? For the target property it says: "This must be a URL that points to an address on the same domain as the content being ...


5

That happens automatically. Google extracts what it thinks are key bits of information from the page, without needing any special markup or configuration on the site owner's part. It's likely an evolution of the list and table snippets which started appearing around 2011.


4

However, Google does use ccTLDs as a signal for geotargeting, so if you can avoid using a ccTLD for content which is intended to have a wider audience than a specific country, I'd recommend doing so. There's a very similar question/discussion here: Advantages of country TLD vs. .com


4

No. From Google's FAQ: *.com, .org, .gov, .ponies—does my top-level domain impact my site's performance in search? Google's goal is to return the best and most relevant results to the user, regardless of the top-level domain. If our system determines that the best result is a page on a new gTLD, we'll return that page in search results.* http://support....


4

If your exact search term is going to be the full 'John Smith', I am pretty certain that you are indeed correct and that having /johnsmith would be better as you are targeting a more refined search term and the extension matches up completely with the search term, which we can only assume is a good thing.


4

All data on a page should be in the same language to make language detection easier for search engines. On a page with <html lang="fr"> English keywords could actually be harmful because (at least) Google doesn’t use just the lang attribute to determine the real language. In practice … I wouldn’t waste time with keywords. I don’t know any relevant ...


4

20,000 records is not a lot at all. It's not uncommon for a table to have millions of records and, if your database is designed properly, still be very fast. So using Autocomplete with a table of 20,000 or even one million records is definitely feasible and shouldn't be slow. If it is you need to revisit your database design and SQL queries to make sure ...


4

Search engine robots don't perform searches on your site directly (i.e., using search forms). In order for them to crawl and index search results, the search parameters would have to be contained within URLs, like: example.com/search/index.php?keywords=fruits example.com/search/index.php?keywords=apple example.com/search/index.php?keywords=banana Then ...


4

Sure there are concerns in dumping huge numbers of pages onto your site and whether it would be considered spam or not or have a negative SEO effect. I just want to give my perspective since I feel you are within a safe range of pages and likely have fair domain trust due to domain age and stability. My experience is this. My site can add over 3000 pages ...


4

After some investigation it turns out that this is a problem with Google Maps. The red pin pointer is inserting some text on the page which is getting pulled into search results so it's not really something that can be fixed until Google look into it. Oh well.


4

Yes. Although Google can submit some forms they generally do not do so. So any content that is only available via a form submission should be assumed to be hidden from search engines. Yes. This is functionally the same as an HTML sitemap. You can also submit an XML sitemap (although they don't guarantee crawling).


4

A site needs to exist for a while and get popular before Google will recommend it for its brand name and URL. The good news is that Google is indexing your site and will show it in search results in "verbatim" mode: This indicates that Google knows about the website and will show it if you say "I really mean what I'm searching for, don't show me synonyms ...


4

Google and other major search engines are pretty good at learning and returning brandings that are purposely mispelt. Even my own site spelt BYBE Google used to returning results for 'BABY' and 'BABE' for almost a year, other good examples: Flickr Reddit Digg Tumblr Mashbord Fiverr All purposely misspelt; Google will associate the correct and incorrect ...


4

Using the inurl operator for Google should do the trick. Assuming your PDF files all have the .pdf extension, adding -inurl:pdf to your search will exclude those URLs. https://www.google.com/search?safe=off&q=site:example.com%2Fsubfolder%2F+-inurl%3Apdf


4

You have an error in your robots.txt file. On line 11 you have Allow: /, a robots.txt file doesn't say what files and directories you can allow, only what you can disallow. The only supported commands for the robots.txt file are "User-agent" and "Disallow". As the Disallow: /random command is after the invalid command it is possible the Google Searchbot ...


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