24

Since 2009 it is Google's official statement that they don't use the meta keywords tag for ranking purposes: https://webmasters.googleblog.com/2009/09/google-does-not-use-keywords-meta-tag.html They in fact even that they sometimes use it as a spam signal, especially for webmasters that enter a great number of keywords in it. In terms of inserting keywords ...


12

FYI, meta tags have no effects on rankings so no meta tags is the same as empty meta tags is the same as full meta tags. Having said that, empty meta tags are the same as no meta tags. Either way you are not providing search engines or any other crawler any information normally provided in those tags. If I had to choose one or the other I would simply omit ...


6

There is no benefit to having an empty meta description or meta keywords. They take up a few bytes in the page source. You might as well leave them out. On the flip side, it shouldn't really hurt when those fields are empty compared to not having them. If your CMS requires that they are there and you don't want to write content for them, it would be OK ...


6

Meta Keywords doesn't make any improvements in SEO, use Meta Description instead. Google says "Google has ignored the keywords meta tag for years" FYI, different search engines show different number of characters of meta description and title tags. Ref: http://www.sagerock.com/blog/title-tag-meta-description-length/


6

You have good intentions, but you are using some elements wrong, so let me clarify a few things and the answer to your question will be at the end. Each page on a site has a language, that means that there is one main language for the content of a given page. That language, should be defined on the right meta tag, specifically, content-language, like this &...


5

Google usually shows differing search results when people search for the singular vs the plural. So SEO has to be done separately for the different terms. Start by figuring out which version (singular or plural) has the higher search volume. Use the Adwords Keyword Tool to compare search volumes. Make sure to select "[Exact]" as the "Match Type" in the ...


5

Meta Keywords are useless for SEO, and random meta keywords are useless for everything!!! Read wikipedia: in September 2009 Matt Cutts of Google announced that they are no longer taking keywords into account whatsoever... In Oct 2009...Yahoo!'s Senior Director...states that "...What changed with Yahoo's ranking algorithms is that while we still ...


4

Then don't put the keyword in your title. Google are clever enough now to know what the page is about and how relevant it is for popcorn without you needing to include the word popcorn in the title. Google can distinguish between similarities, synonyms and semantics. They'll be able to understand popcorn from corn. If you don't think the page is that ...


3

Yes. If only one meta element with the keywords name would be allowed, the spec would restrict it, like it does with the description name: There must not be more than one meta element with its name attribute set to the value description per document. It doesn’t restrict it for the keywords name. The algorithm even considers that there might be several ...


3

The problem is you have a hidden character between the <head> and first <meta> element. Make sure all your pages and PHP files have the correct UTF-8 encoding (you can convert them in Notepad++ or Sublime Text if you have those apps). Edit: just tested and it's the character 'ZERO WIDTH NO-BREAK SPACE' (U+FEFF)


3

Meta keywords have zero effect on rankings in Google and most major search engines. So while your suggestion is a valid one, it's honestly not worth wasting a second on using meta keywords at all.


3

Google announced in 2009 that they no longer use the meta keywords tags as a ranking factor, and Bing have since stated they could view it as a spam signal rather than a ranking aid. I'm pretty sure that most other major search engines no longer use the meta keywords tag, apart from Yandex. and Baidu. So I'd recommend not using the tag at all unless you ...


3

It's not going to well in search result. Displaying the same content on different URL's is considered to be 'duplicate content' (Google mostly focuses on body content), no matter if your title, meta description and meta keywords (Not supported by Google) are different. You have three choices: Provide different content for each question. In same page use ...


3

You seem to have a few things going on. I do not know WP so I will not give specific advice in that regard. However, you do not want multiple copies of either meta-tag on any page. Only one will be used. It is likely that only the first one will be used. The keywords meta-tag is totally ignored by all search engines except Yandex. I would advise not using ...


2

There is some weird going on in there. I just tried to validate without <!doctype html> <html itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Organization"> <head> <meta charset="utf-8"> Then I added them one after one into the code again and it validates as it should. Start with <!doctype html> then <html> -> <head> -> <...


2

Google doesn't take into account meta keywords tag for SEO and that for many years (since 2009). You just can delete it. Moreover, keywords you use in this meta gives keywords ideas for your contestants. You can read this: http://googlewebmastercentral.blogspot.ca/2009/09/google-does-not-use-keywords-meta-tag.html.


2

I don't know where do you see this message but for SEO, no worries. The keywords meta tag doesn't take into account anymore by search engines. You can read this article from Matt Cutts for more information.


2

While it is possible other search engines still use the keywords tag, Google does not. I'm fairly certain Bing doesn't either. (Edit: As Stephen says below, Bing actually does still use the meta keywords, though the article {and a few more recent ones} imply that it's not a major factor and spammy action is still bad). http://googlewebmastercentral.blogspot....


2

There are several things you can do. You can view page source code and look for the following: title tag description meta-tag h1, h2, h3... tags first 1 or 2 paragraphs You will want to discount any stop words of common words of course. While the description meta-tag has little or no value for SEO, it does offer great clues to keywords and page topic. You ...


2

Part of the answer you are seeking is in: Is splitting keywords with HTML tags bad for ranking? (ignore the title) where I discuss/describe how Google handles keyword phrases. It will explain how Google sees the search world of terms, phrases, and so forth. It is short and well worth a read. In short, you do not have to handle permutations as in your ...


2

Search engines do not use the meta keywords tag in ranking, since it is so easily abused, so any "character limit" is irrelevant. You can use it for your own internal use if required, but otherwise it's unnecessary.


2

Ditch the meta-keyword tag, or at the very least, ditch the same repeating words regardless of whether the letters are upper or lower case. Google doesn't pay much attention to meta-keywords and I believe Bing will use them against you if they are used the way you do. You're trying to rank for a keyword in an artificial way. The only meta tag you should use ...


2

The example: I need to rank for free x123456 templates and free y123456 themes, but I don't want to use two different long-tails, so can I use it like this free x123456 y123456 templates themes, having the same effect? Yes as long as it makes sense and that the resulting keyword set occupies 2% to 5% of the total text count. Anything more than 5% and it ...


2

For Google, it is not necessary to use a meta keyword tag. It won’t help in search engine optimization. It is seen as a spam signal rather than a ranking signal. Adding keywords to a meta keyword tag could also give your competitors an idea of what keywords you are using. So don't waste time on them and focus on quality content. Here is a video from Google ...


1

Matt Morgan did some testing of pages having multiple title tags and multiple meta description tags. He found that for both the page title and meta description, the first one was the one that was used most of the time. However, he could get his alternate title and meta description to display in the SERPs by changing his query to be words from the ...


1

The better practice is to create only one keyword tag and use the most related and unique keywords. Two tags may put an impression as you are doing stuffing.


1

Keywords Meta-tag I completely ignore the keywords meta-tag since most search engines ignore it. There are some exceptions such as Yandex. It is fairly safe for the major SEs to ignore this tag. However, it costs you nothing to have one if it is convenient. Description Meta-tag As for the description meta-tag, both answers from John and Stephen are both ...


1

Although the keywords are not used by Google, some other search engines may use it. So, it's not a horrible idea to include a keyword meta tag. It won't hurt - assuming they are correctly implemented. And although Google says they don't use it for search rankings, that doesn't mean they don't look at it as a clue to a site that is trying to use it ...


1

The one for which your content is the better search result. Search engine users expect different content when searching for singular or plural keywords. Singular keyword content examples: A general description what a baseball bat is (~ the wikipedia article) An article or shopping page for the single best baseball bat in the world (everyone agrees about). ...


1

See "Internationalized Domains and SEO" on the YouMOZ Blog from Sep, 2011 for some technical apspects and choosing the right strategy and some answers on Internationalization on Google Webmaster Central: Q: Can I use non-English / non-ASCII URLs? A: Yes. Past the domain name, which can be an IDN, we recommend using UTF-8 for path, filename, and query ...


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