12

FYI, meta tags have no effects on rankings so no meta tags is the same as empty meta tags is the same as full meta tags. Having said that, empty meta tags are the same as no meta tags. Either way you are not providing search engines or any other crawler any information normally provided in those tags. If I had to choose one or the other I would simply omit ...


11

Short Answer: Use both! Long Answer: The OG stands for Open Graph which is apart of the Open Graph protocol of which works on platforms such as Facebook. The meta description element is for search engines such as Google, Yahoo and Bing. Since these are two separate tags that kinda do the same thing but they are designed for different types of platforms, ...


7

It depends on the definition of abstract. For HTML5, abstract is not registered. So you must not use this metadata name in (X)HTML5 documents. The metadata name description is defined in the HTML5 specification itself, so it’s valid to use it in (X)HTML5 documents. In HTML 4.01, you can use any metadata names, so using abstract would be allowed. But it ...


7

Meta Description = Search Engines, OG Descriptions = Social Platforms Meta Description is used by Search Engines Bots, while the OG (The Open Graph protocol) is used by Social Media Bots, therefore if you want 'extra' information on Social Media sites then you should opt to use both the META and OG tags. You can find a list of whom uses OG below. Source ...


6

There is no benefit to having an empty meta description or meta keywords. They take up a few bytes in the page source. You might as well leave them out. On the flip side, it shouldn't really hurt when those fields are empty compared to not having them. If your CMS requires that they are there and you don't want to write content for them, it would be OK ...


6

You have good intentions, but you are using some elements wrong, so let me clarify a few things and the answer to your question will be at the end. Each page on a site has a language, that means that there is one main language for the content of a given page. That language, should be defined on the right meta tag, specifically, content-language, like this &...


5

I’d have thought exactly the same: that there are no real pros or cons in where you place the TITLE element within the HTML document’s HEAD area. However, although this is nothing whatsoever to do with SEO, I do remember reading that in an HTML document, the best practise is to include the TITLE after the first META tag that declares the content-type and/or ...


5

Search engines, just like every other user, only see the output of your scripts. Not the source code. FYI, meta tags do not affect your rankings.


5

Yes, they are allowed in the meta description tag. They are valid HTML entities and will be handled and displayed correctly by search engines.


4

Google uses the titles and descriptions found in your webpages to display a title and description in the snippet it returns in its search results, as illustrated in number 1 below: If titles and descriptions are duplicates from page to page, then search results will appear the same to users. Therefore, Google requires them to be unique. To remove these ...


4

Another answer could be which meta tags are recognised by search engines. For example, abstract is not understood by Google as a valid meta tag whereas description is. Other search engines may have different criteria.


4

Meta descriptions serve two purposes in my opinion: They "somewhat/indirectly" help with SEO. Google algorithm does not use Meta Description as one of its ranking factors. However, by providing better user experience (see point #2) you have a much better chance of getting social, referral traffic as well as improving your link profile. They help with ...


4

Your current meta description is too long to fit into Google's search results pages. If this happens, instead of truncating the current description, Google often pull content from elsewhere on the page to create a description. This often results in unhelpful, incomplete or widely inaccurate description such as yours. The first thing you should do is ...


4

I'm gonna attempt to go simple as the OP requests. Each webpage with a title and meta description will contain source code with these lines in it near the beginning of the code: <title>insert title here</title> <meta name="description" content="insert description here"> ...Except that "insert title here" is meant to be the actual title ...


4

Yes. Although the point of a tag is to make a suggestion to Google as to what you'd like to see on the SERP result description. If you have only 2 lines of content - it's a no brainer for Google and the tag is redundant. It will just scrape the description from the page. Also be warned that pages that are too 'thin' on content will either not be indexed or ...


4

"meta-description" is a notation that means: meta element with the description name. (I’m using it for example in this answer.) So you don’t use meta-description as name (which would be invalid anyway, because it’s not registered), but description.


4

If your page will not be optimised well with appropriate text then it will not hurt in a bad way. But it may be hard for you to get the desired ranking. So, if you are serious about the ranking then i would say have a good website structure with appropriate content (Text, Images, videos etc).


3

Necessary? No. The meta description is not required by WordPress to function nor is it used by the search engines for ranking purposes. However, some search engines, including Google, do use it for possily displaying its content with a page's search result listing. This means it affords you some control over how your search engine results appear. Since this ...


3

Note that we do not use locational meta tags (like "geo.position" or "distribution") or HTML attributes for geotargeting. While these may be useful in other regards, we've found that they are generally not reliable enough to use for geotargeting. (from: Working with multi-regional websites) Other SE might have a different view, Bing as an example. It ...


3

The order in which the meta data appears will have no impact, you just need to ensure that it appears in the <head> section of the page. Search engines look at all the meta data to get an indication as to the purpose of the page and therefore it is about the way the meta data in correlated that is important.


3

The last time I tested this, it does not. If you put some weird word in the meta description (something like "xenylotior"), then you will not be able to find it in Google search. If you put that word in the text of the page, you will be able to find it. Words in the meta description are not used for ranking because they are not indexed and not searchable. ...


3

I checked several sites that contain large numbers in their SERP description. The pattern seems to be as follows: When the description is being pulled from the meta description, it loses the commas. When the description is being pulled from content on the page, it keeps the commas. That seems to be how it works, though I'd be interested if anyone finds an ...


3

I don't think there is any harm in doing this from an SEO perspective as this tag is not used as a ranking factor anymore. As far as Google using it to display the snippet for your pages in their search results, they can choose to simply ignore the <br> tag or choose a different snippet to display such as your ODP description (if it exists) or a ...


3

Unless something is wrong on Google’s side, they’ll display &amp; as & if used in HTML. (Note that in HTML5 you don’t have to encode the ampersand in your specific example, because it’s not ambiguous.)


3

Google announced in 2009 that they no longer use the meta keywords tags as a ranking factor, and Bing have since stated they could view it as a spam signal rather than a ranking aid. I'm pretty sure that most other major search engines no longer use the meta keywords tag, apart from Yandex. and Baidu. So I'd recommend not using the tag at all unless you ...


3

It's not going to well in search result. Displaying the same content on different URL's is considered to be 'duplicate content' (Google mostly focuses on body content), no matter if your title, meta description and meta keywords (Not supported by Google) are different. You have three choices: Provide different content for each question. In same page use ...


3

You seem to have a few things going on. I do not know WP so I will not give specific advice in that regard. However, you do not want multiple copies of either meta-tag on any page. Only one will be used. It is likely that only the first one will be used. The keywords meta-tag is totally ignored by all search engines except Yandex. I would advise not using ...


3

Looks like this was because of Google experimenting something. Today when searching with the same keyword Google displays the description as expected, everything shown from beginning and trimming last few words. We did not changed anything during this entire time on the website so it was definitely from Google's end. Thank you for your help.


3

The two are part of two different standards. They shall never meet. For the HTML Description Meta-Tag, that would describe the entire page. For the Itemprop Description, that would apply to only the content segment you are marking up. There may be cases where it is appropriate that they are the same such as a product page within an e-commerce site. It is ...


3

Actually Google own support.google.com doc pages using auto generated meta description. Also the words are not truncated properly. In most of cases Google ignore your meta description when user query does not match with your current meta description. For example in above doc the meta description is this The payment methods available to you depend on your ...


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