65

Chrome Opening the “Console” panel of Chrome’s DevTools: Windows and Linux: Ctrl + Shift + J Mac OS: Cmd + Opt + J Note: In addition to the “Console” panel, there also exists a smaller slide-up console which can be toggled via Esc while any of the other panels is active. Full documentation Firefox Opening the “Console” panel in Firefox’s Developer ...


55

If you serve jQuery from a popular CDN such as Google's Hosted Libraries or cdnjs, it won't be redownloaded if your visitor has been on a site that referenced it from the same source (as long as the cached version has not expired). jQuery is a popular library, just as you say, but bundling it with the browser is not likely to happen for a few reasons: ...


34

Make your site play well with IE8. Really. IE8 isn't all that outdated. Unless your site is made solely to cater to them, in which case it should have been made to work with what they have in the first place. You don't have control over what they run...they don't have control over what they run...but you do have control over what you serve. So the answer ...


28

Yes, all mainstream browsers "append a slash" to the HTTP request when requesting a bare domain URL (ie. the homepage). This is actually necessary in order to make the HTTP request valid, which for http://example.com/ is: GET / HTTP/1.1 Host: example.com Note the / (slash) in the first line - this is the URL being requested. It is not valid to have nothing ...


21

Not only is jQuery not the only popular JS library, a browser would potentially have to include multiple versions. The Google CDN currently lists: 42 versions of jQuery; 44 versions of jQuery UI; 6 versions of jQuery Mobile. It's better to allow web developers to define which version of a library to download based on their website's requirements. If you use ...


16

That depends on the device and version. The most common, particularly for less new devices is the Android Browser. Like Chrome, it is based on Webkit and identifies itself as: Mozilla/5.0 (Linux; U; Android x.x; Build/xx) AppleWebKit/530.17 (KHTML like Gecko) Version/4.0 Mobile Safari 530/17 Most recent - at least those from Google - devices use Chrome for ...


14

Because Microsoft Edge presents a User-Agent string that contains the word Chrome. And, for that matter, Safari. Check out http://whatsmyuseragent.com/ and you'll see something like this: (Emphasis mine) This is deliberate on Microsoft's behalf to fool naïve user-agent checks into thinking that it's not Internet Explorer. Which it isn't.


14

The browser is the engine it isn't the engine designer's duty to find out what kind of fuel and extra parts are you going to put into your car and include it for you. If they would do this browsers would be a huge bloatware because the next question will be "why just jQuery?", and we would end up maintaining dependency repositories. Also, will we include ...


14

The browser isn't looking for a file. It's just asking for a resource. The server then decides what that resource returns. At it's most basic level that "file" is literally just a file. In the case of the default index page of a directory how the server is set up will determine which files is returned. Some servers are configured by default to return index....


14

Your browsers doesn't load any file, it requests a resource which the server then provides at his discretion (lengthy elaboration below). If you type google.com into your browsers toolbar, the browser wil first append a protocol, either http:// or https. Then browser will look up the IP address belonging to google.com, which is 172.217.19.206. Your browser ...


13

Auto-discovery still works for most feed-readers, for instance with Google Reader I just tested out this page and plugged the exact URL in the subscribe text input. It then automatically subscribed to the comments for this question. So no, providing an image with a link is just a visual way of letting users know that there's an RSS feed available if they're ...


12

Chrome and Safari send an X-Purpose: preview HTTP header when pre-fetching/rendering web content. [Source] Firefox sends a similar header called X-moz: prefetch. [Source] To block pre-fetching, you could return a 404 response when such headers are detected, as suggested by Peter Freitag in this blog post. He recommends adding these lines to .htaccess to ...


9

It will not use the browser default font. But rather it will use the default sans-serif font. Since the last font in the font stack is not a specific font. It is a generic name. Some browsers allow you to set it or it will default to the OS of the users computer. Reference URL: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/CSS/font-family


9

You have two approaches to this problem. The clean way is to set the headers returned for GET data.txt preventing the browser (or proxy) from storing the response in cache. Using apache, this can usually be done by adding a few lines in a .htaccess file. If this data.txt is a static file, this is the only way you could control the headers. From https://...


7

This is a product and policy question, not a technical question. However, I deal with a similar situation - we host a website that is based on a vendor's product, and it has a compatibility list. That list is given to our customers as part of their statement of work. If they can't run the browser(s) that we say our site works with, they don't get support for ...


7

It's such a small amount of data on each page request I include both the link and something on the page to allow users to subscribe on browsers that don't support it. FYI, it's never been part of Chrome. I love Chrome except for the fact I sometimes have to manually find this tag in the HTML of the page.


7

Google Chrome does not send any special headers to prerender requests anymore. See: https://code.google.com/p/chromium/issues/detail?id=86175 https://github.com/nickhsharp/prefetchNightmare


6

For a long time, I only tested on Chrome/Firefox/Safari/IE/Opera on Windows, but about 2 years ago, I ran into a problem where the client was complaining about a screwed up layout on their Mac. I looked at the site in Adobe Browser Lab using OS X Safari and indeed it was rendering improperly compared to Safari for Windows. Ever since then, I've stopped ...


6

"Is there a common way to override the server headers send to the browser from within the HTML document?" AFAIK no, you do what you can do already. The defined charset via Header trumps your definition in the META tag. If you have access to the server, e.g. Apache, it is configured by this statement (see the comment lines): # Read the documentation before ...


6

Digicert maintains pages for compatibility with certificate types: SAN certificate compatibility Wildcard certificate compatibility They note several server side compatibility problems with wildcard certificates but no client side problems. SAN certificates are problemic for some older browsers: Versions of major web browsers from before 2003. Older ...


6

will browsers recognize individual files as being the same as pre-cached ones, if they are served from different subdomains? No. Two identical files served from different locations are different files as far as the browser (cache) is concerned. The URL is the key by which the file is cached by the browser. As media1, media2 etc all serve the same files, ...


6

No. The href must point to an absolute URI. Relative is not allowed on a base element. This attribute specifies an absolute URI that acts as the base URI for resolving relative URIs. The HTML5 standard says, in reference to the href attribute of <base>: The document base URL of a Document object is the absolute URL


5

The only way to change this is by replacing the button, (e.g. with SWFUpload) but I don't see why you would want to. You shouldn't change the user's system language. They've chosen their system language for a reason, and there's an expectation that their UI will be rendered in this language that they can read/understand.


5

You can use Safari with select menu : Develope -> User Agents -> Iphone/iPod/ iPad to Simulate testing in iPhone/ iPod/ iPad device. In Firefox, you can add plugin FireMobileSimulator to simulate testing in some specific Japan mobile (Docomo, Softbank, ...)


5

One of the best options is to make them install the Chrome Frame plugin: http://code.google.com/chrome/chromeframe/ The benefits are: Your wordpress site will load as if they had Chrome. Other sites, including their corporate tools, will still render in IE8. They won't have to upgrade their browser. You will need to add a meta tag to your wordpress site. ...


5

Be warned that Windows Vista implements the stupid parts of RFC3484 (i.e. the backporting from IPV6 to IPV4) and will prefer the IP address that shares most prefix bits with the user's IP address rather than picking one at random. Since most users have IP addresses that start with 192.168, that means whichever of your IP addresses happens to share most ...


5

There are up-to-date stats at http://gs.statcounter.com/ Just select "Screen resolution" from the stat dropdown. At the time of this writing, it seems that 1366 * 768 is the rage.


5

Openmeetings perfectly embeds into web sites


5

After the release of Barracuda Opera uses the <link rel=”icon”> or <link rel="apple-touch-icon"> meta in the site's header to find the logo, but it will only show in Opera if the attached image is wider than 114px. In stackoverflow's case the code looks like this:- <link rel="apple-touch-icon" href="http://cdn.sstatic.net/stackoverflow/img/...


5

Androids use the Android Browser as well as a few others that they can download. You can test your website on using an Android VM on your local machine. While for iPhone, iPad testing I recommend you get yourself these devices as there is no VM's available for these devices and the online emulators are not the real deal.


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