131

If ( your site does not make money ){ do what makes you happy } else if ( the cost of supporting IE6 > the money you make from IE6 users ) { stop supporting IE6 } else { keep making money from IE6 users }


65

Chrome Opening the “Console” panel of Chrome’s DevTools: Windows: Ctrl + Shift + J Mac OS: Cmd + Opt + J Note: In addition to the “Console” panel, there also exists a smaller slide-up console which can be toggled via Esc while any of the other panels is active. Full documentation Firefox Opening the “Console” panel in Firefox’s Developer Tools: ...


55

If you serve jQuery from a popular CDN such as Google's Hosted Libraries or cdnjs, it won't be redownloaded if your visitor has been on a site that referenced it from the same source (as long as the cached version has not expired). jQuery is a popular library, just as you say, but bundling it with the browser is not likely to happen for a few reasons: ...


52

Common reasons people avoid browser upgrades: They can't, either because doing so requires admin access (e.g. university networks), or because their hardware and operating system prevents it (or both). They don't know how. Firefox is famous for prompting people to upgrade. Chrome does it in the background. Safari does it through system updates. But earlier ...


43

I agree that your decision obviously should reflect the business realities and audience of your particular website. That said, large companies officially dropping support for IE6 is still significant. It raises the general perception that it is finally OK to leave a 10 year old browser behind. It also adds ammunition to any case you wish to make to the ...


34

Make your site play well with IE8. Really. IE8 isn't all that outdated. Unless your site is made solely to cater to them, in which case it should have been made to work with what they have in the first place. You don't have control over what they run...they don't have control over what they run...but you do have control over what you serve. So the answer ...


27

Yes, all mainstream browsers "append a slash" to the HTTP request when requesting a bare domain URL (ie. the homepage). This is actually necessary in order to make the HTTP request valid, which for http://example.com/ is: GET / HTTP/1.1 Host: example.com Note the / (slash) in the first line - this is the URL being requested. It is not valid to have nothing ...


22

There are actually a number of reasons. Most of them are related to corporations and I think looking at the difference in visitor browsers for corp websites vs personal sites (e.g. amazon.com, zappos.com, etc) Large and Medium size Corporations use software that requires a specific browser, usually IE6. Because of this, they create a software constraint ...


21

Not only is jQuery not the only popular JS library, a browser would potentially have to include multiple versions. The Google CDN currently lists: 42 versions of jQuery; 44 versions of jQuery UI; 6 versions of jQuery Mobile. It's better to allow web developers to define which version of a library to download based on their website's requirements. If you use ...


16

That depends on the device and version. The most common, particularly for less new devices is the Android Browser. Like Chrome, it is based on Webkit and identifies itself as: Mozilla/5.0 (Linux; U; Android x.x; Build/xx) AppleWebKit/530.17 (KHTML like Gecko) Version/4.0 Mobile Safari 530/17 Most recent - at least those from Google - devices use Chrome for ...


14

Because Microsoft Edge presents a User-Agent string that contains the word Chrome. And, for that matter, Safari. Check out http://whatsmyuseragent.com/ and you'll see something like this: (Emphasis mine) This is deliberate on Microsoft's behalf to fool naïve user-agent checks into thinking that it's not Internet Explorer. Which it isn't.


14

The browser is the engine it isn't the engine designer's duty to find out what kind of fuel and extra parts are you going to put into your car and include it for you. If they would do this browsers would be a huge bloatware because the next question will be "why just jQuery?", and we would end up maintaining dependency repositories. Also, will we include ...


14

The browser isn't looking for a file. It's just asking for a resource. The server then decides what that resource returns. At it's most basic level that "file" is literally just a file. In the case of the default index page of a directory how the server is set up will determine which files is returned. Some servers are configured by default to return index....


14

Your browsers doesn't load any file, it requests a resource which the server then provides at his discretion (lengthy elaboration below). If you type google.com into your browsers toolbar, the browser wil first append a protocol, either http:// or https. Then browser will look up the IP address belonging to google.com, which is 172.217.19.206. Your browser ...


13

I think this has to be dictated by metrics. If a significant number / percentage of visitors is using older browsers, you should support your visitors. What is "significant" depends on the client. ;-)


13

Auto-discovery still works for most feed-readers, for instance with Google Reader I just tested out this page and plugged the exact URL in the subscribe text input. It then automatically subscribed to the comments for this question. So no, providing an image with a link is just a visual way of letting users know that there's an RSS feed available if they're ...


11

A browser recommendation is usually a Do Not Enter sign. Unless you have an extremely popular service with unique features, it is extremely unlikely that people will change browsers for you. Therefore they are highly likely to simply leave. This does not mean you have to write code that works perfectly for every browser. In a support page somewhere you can ...


11

Wikipedia provides an updated browser statistics summary that includes the top sources and median of these sources: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Usage_share_of_web_browsers#Summary_table For most uses, the wikipedia median is probably your best estimate for accurate browser statistics. Each of the main browser stats providers are not 100% reliable ...


11

Chrome and Safari send an X-Purpose: preview HTTP header when pre-fetching/rendering web content. [Source] Firefox sends a similar header called X-moz: prefetch. [Source] To block pre-fetching, you could return a 404 response when such headers are detected, as suggested by Peter Freitag in this blog post. He recommends adding these lines to .htaccess to ...


9

It will not use the browser default font. But rather it will use the default sans-serif font. Since the last font in the font stack is not a specific font. It is a generic name. Some browsers allow you to set it or it will default to the OS of the users computer. Reference URL: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/CSS/font-family


9

You have two approaches to this problem. The clean way is to set the headers returned for GET data.txt preventing the browser (or proxy) from storing the response in cache. Using apache, this can usually be done by adding a few lines in a .htaccess file. If this data.txt is a static file, this is the only way you could control the headers. From https://...


8

I've not seen this answer, so what about piracy? I'd guess that a lot of people use IE6 or older versions of IE because they have pirated systems and they can't do software updates on them.


7

I am a product manager about to spend 40 MD supporting IE6 for a single customer. We sell software into call centers, an unfortunately IE6 is the default platform for many big organizations. My point is it depends, if I was building consumer web software I would have been off IE6 a long time ago, but as long as we have clients using IE6 we have to support ...


7

This is a product and policy question, not a technical question. However, I deal with a similar situation - we host a website that is based on a vendor's product, and it has a compatibility list. That list is given to our customers as part of their statement of work. If they can't run the browser(s) that we say our site works with, they don't get support for ...


7

It's such a small amount of data on each page request I include both the link and something on the page to allow users to subscribe on browsers that don't support it. FYI, it's never been part of Chrome. I love Chrome except for the fact I sometimes have to manually find this tag in the HTML of the page.


7

Google Chrome does not send any special headers to prerender requests anymore. See: https://code.google.com/p/chromium/issues/detail?id=86175 https://github.com/nickhsharp/prefetchNightmare


6

You can use a website like browsershots, Browsera, Cross Browser Testing, Multi-Browser Viewer, BrowserSeal, and Multi Browser vmWare Appliance You shouldn't need to be checking that many browsers, however. With the exception of Internet Explorer which seems to make radical changes with every release, most of the modern browser only make incremental changes ...


6

For a long time, I only tested on Chrome/Firefox/Safari/IE/Opera on Windows, but about 2 years ago, I ran into a problem where the client was complaining about a screwed up layout on their Mac. I looked at the site in Adobe Browser Lab using OS X Safari and indeed it was rendering improperly compared to Safari for Windows. Ever since then, I've stopped ...


6

"Is there a common way to override the server headers send to the browser from within the HTML document?" AFAIK no, you do what you can do already. The defined charset via Header trumps your definition in the META tag. If you have access to the server, e.g. Apache, it is configured by this statement (see the comment lines): # Read the documentation before ...


6

Digicert maintains pages for compatibility with certificate types: SAN certificate compatibility Wildcard certificate compatibility They note several server side compatibility problems with wildcard certificates but no client side problems. SAN certificates are problemic for some older browsers: Versions of major web browsers from before 2003. Older ...


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