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You can't. Site Speed (as the metric is defined in Analytics) is attributed to pages, not users. You can add the typical secondary dimensions when exploring these statistics, but these dimensions don't include users. You should be able to get a decent idea of page speeds by whatever metrics might be a deciding factor (new vs returning, for example) by ...


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Google Analytics has its own way to calculate metrics that can differ from other platforms. At this point, is important to understand how they calculate exit percentage: For all pageviews to the page, Exit Rate is the percentage that was the last in the session. I assume in your checkout process the URL is always the same, is that right? In that case, in ...


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Of course, you can. It's as simple as creating the tags in Google Tag Manager and set up those events in Google Analytics as Goals. However, in this scenario, you can send the data to Analytics as events or virtual pageviews. As events, you can check them in the event's report and as virtual pageviews, you can work with them as usual URLs inside Analytics. ...


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The motion charts in GA still work. To view them, install and enable Flash player for https://analytics.google.com. In Data Studio, (assuming you have GA added as a data source) add a time series chart with Dimension set to Date, Month (or another time dimension that is offered within the dimension drop down options), then add Pageviews as the Metric and ...


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Google Analytics provides a way to add a filename to any page path ending with a slash, in order to standardize data for pages that might be accessible with or without the filename. Look in Admin > View Settings for the Default Page field, right underneath time zone. An index.php in that field is your reason!


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[Edited a few times per comments] Bounce rate and exit rate aren't comparable values. For Page A, the bounce rate is (sessions where the only hit was a Page A PV) / (sessions that landed on Page A) whereas exit rate is (Page A PV that were the last PV of their session) / (all Page A PV) See Exit Rate vs. Bounce Rate from Analytics Help. Since your ...


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Probably not. Providing you don't have anything that is causing long page load times loading before the Google tracking code is fired, then there shouldn't be a problem. If you do have something that might be causing users to abandon the page prior to the GA code registering the page view, then you might see an increase in exits from the page the user was ...


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You'll have to put this together from a couple of places, but you should be able to get what you are looking for. The Source dimension is always the source for the session as a whole, so you're right that it's not the only thing you need to look at. It is likely something you want to look at to get the whole picture, though! If you go to Behavior > Site ...


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I can think of 2 cases where an event goal would not fire when the event happens. The goal is not active. In the final column of Admin -> View -> Goals, Recording must be set to On. The event has been triggered more than once in the same session. Goals are only recorded at most once per session, so subsequent event hits will not increase goal conversions. ...


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By default, Google Analytics works with URLs without a Hostname. It's what they call page, which indicates the path of the page being accessed. As you set up a view which filters traffic from the subdomain xxxx.example.com, when you generate the virtual page, it must follow that pattern in order to appear in the view: ga('set', 'page', 'xxxx.example.com/...


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