4

The objective measure is in money: How much does it cost to maintain the browser support vs how much it costs to turn away users because of browser compatibility. Costs of turning away users Immediate revenue lost from sales or advertising "Bad will" where users remember that your site doesn't work and are less likely to use it in the future Wasted ...


3

All major browsers support redirects and have done so seamlessly for 20 years. The last browser that didn't support redirects well was Netscape 4. That was about 1997. Even then, redirects worked but: The screen would flash. The redirect URL was added to history. That meant that it was difficult to use the back button from the page after the redirect. ...


3

AMP is just HTML/CSS/JS, that's why it works in all modern browsers. Browsers don't really "read AMP", they read HTML/CSS/JS because that's what AMP is comprised of. From the AMP documentation: AMP HTML is a subset of HTML for authoring content pages such as news articles in a way that guarantees certain baseline performance characteristics. [...] ...


3

Most of the time it's not the SSL that browsers don't support - it's your server settings and cipher suite. All new browsers support pretty much everything though, its just the old stuff you have to worry about. Examples are as follows: SNI - This is to allow multiple certs on multiple domains to be applied to 1 IP. Known as a multi-tennant server. XP users ...


2

Doctype and Microdata shouldn't create many problems. It's possible that it will throw IE into 'quirks' mode, but you will probably be fine. The problem with HTML5 tags like header and article are that older browsers don't recognize them as block level elements. So if you are using them in that way at all you may be in for some layout surprises. There are ...


2

You are correct, some older browsers like Internet Explorer 8 provide little to no support for HTML5 elements and other HTML5 features. There are online sites which can help you identify what's missing in IE 8 and older browsers, such as this one. There are also open-source projects like this often-cited one, aimed at improving HTML5 compatibility for IE 8: ...


2

You can take a look into Qualys SSL labs. Another good Certificate Authority or reseller can provide you with browser compatibility information. An example of this is https://www.positivessl.com/browser_compatibility.php Know that the configuration of your SSL settings also can affect the browser or device compatibility. Other things to consider are: The ...


2

While there are differences, there is not much that cannot be made compatible in older browsers depending upon what you are doing. If you are developing your site and wanting to add features but feel hampered by the lack of advance in the use of newer versions of a browsers, then you have to decide what you are really doing. For example, if you are ...


2

I remember back in the day I used my phone to access adsense and I get redirected to the mobile site but I forgot the actual URL to it. The actual URL of the "Low-bandwidth version" is: https://www.google.com/adsense/m/ But, I'm not 101% sure that's what you need. I think Opera 11.64 has been released on 2012-05-10, and Firefox 17 on 2012-07-17. I mean ...


2

The average user may be on anything from a small cellphone to a 4k television. You should therefore design your website to run on any size screen, intelligently. Usually this is referred to as 'responsive' design, and there are a lot of great frameworks that'll help you do that (Bootstrap, Zhurb Foundation, HTML5 Boilerplate). On small screens, hide "...


2

Why do you even need it on such an old system? If you really do try Let's Encrypt for SSL on your SSLed site. For your non crawled site set User-agent: * Disallow: / in robots.txt in your root folder. Google has also indicated in 2014, according to this post, that there would be a "minor" rating increase. They have also said that if 2 ratings were the same ...


2

AMP is intended to be a copy of your original page. You should always have a regular HTML version of every page, and consider that the primary copy, the one that most visitors will see - no matter what size screen they're viewing your site on. The AMP version is only intended to be displayed when the visitor is using a mobile device and coming straight from ...


2

Your redirection takes place in the back end, via PHP. So it is not a matter of whether the modern browsers support it. This code runs on your (or your host's) server. It is not run in your browser, so no matter the browser edition no problems are gonna occur due to versioning. To answer the second part of your question, in most sites there is no ...


1

The GDPR law only affects when you manage user's data. You should check your Analytics report and see if the traffic with old browsers is relevant. If not, I'll warn those users to upgrade the browsers in order to log-in/register or use the different options in which we need to track/manage their data. You can even prevent that traffic from using the kind ...


1

Why don't you use a tool like Fiddler to see how many connections your browser is opening per tab? The tool is available here: https://www.telerik.com/fiddler It will allow you to debug your whole socket and see what is going on. Good luck!


1

It seems that <meta name="referrer-policy" …> has never been a standard nor a draft. So <meta name="referrer-policy" content="unsafe-url"> was presumably ignored by Microsoft Edge 16. And regarding Referrer Policies, Can I Use reports that Microsoft Edge versions 12 to 18 initially supported an early draft of the ...


1

Lets get to the simpler answer first, browser support for variable fonts: Firefox developer editions have some level of support, now Chrome 62, Chrome Android, Safari iOS, and Safari. Based on usage, Chrome + mobiles & Safari hit the majority of the most used browsers looking at Can I Use. And now that Chrome has hit general release, the other browsers ...


1

Looking at the data, I would only support IE8 and IE9. However, IE8 may be lacking some functionality which may be core to your site, so you have to weigh up the benefits versus the time spent to support it.


1

I don't think any browsers support LZF transfer compression at this point. I say this because searching for "lzf firefox", "lzf safari", "lzf internet explorer" and "lzf chrome" don't yield any documents about their implementations of it. The only relevant result appears to be a JavaScript library that implements LZF: https://github.com/pkalogiros/LZFjs ...


1

The answer to your question is not that simple and depends on various factors, I'll explain: 1. Features - Are your users going to lose part of the functionality of your site because they are on an old browser? if yes, tell them to update. 2. Audience - Are the audience of your site likely to use an old browser? (ex.: elderly specific content, broad ...


1

Usually, I believe these systems (LastPass, Keychain, Browsers) recognise the requirement for saving fields dependent on your input field name. As an example, my login forms seem to be compatible simply using two inputs. One a text input with name="username" as an attribute and one password input with name="password" as an attribute. Of course ensure that ...


1

You want Modernizr, a feature based detection library. Combine that with Browsehappy.org, and you should be able to detect when someone is on a browser that can't support your website, and they'll be able to easily either upgrade or move to a better browser.


1

This is entirely relative aka, it all depends. I've never had a case where I decided to give up on an IE version. Are you building with web standards? and testing? what's the major issue(s)? A few thoughts: No it is never acceptable to shut down browsers and shut out users. Never do that. Ok so you have to do it. Your plan to ice out < IE9 via cc ...


1

The two approaches are: Install all the browsers that you can on the computers that you have. You'll need multiple platforms: Windows, Mac, Android, iPhone, etc. Emulators and virtual machines can help. Microsoft released virtual machines for testing various versions of Internet Explorer. I can even get these to work on Linux. There are many phone ...


1

I don't think you want to state browser support in "legal" terms. Most sites add something like: Tested using the following browsers: Browser icons (with version numbers) Alternatively, you could include screenshots with different browsers to demonstrate this, or provide a link to results from an online screenshot service like this one: Browser Shots


1

On the server side, you can detect the browser by looking at the HTTP_USER_AGENT header: https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/306576 You can then use different versions of javascript files for different browsers like <script type='text/javascript' src='MainLibraryIE6.js'></script> Another trick is using browser conditional commands such as &...


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