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12

Two examples probably isn't enough to call it "established practice", but it's two big examples at least: Both Google and Twitter use none. Or, if you want to see it this way, their modifier key for navigation is G. To go to your Twitter "favorites" page, you hit G, then F. To go to your gmail drafts folder, hit G then D. Non-navigation shortcuts also use ...


9

It will not use the browser default font. But rather it will use the default sans-serif font. Since the last font in the font stack is not a specific font. It is a generic name. Some browsers allow you to set it or it will default to the OS of the users computer. Reference URL: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/CSS/font-family


8

There's no 'best' or universal key modifier choice Your best options are to: Use no modifier key (single keypresses only), then stop detecting keypresses when the user's cursor is in an input field or textarea, like Google does with Gmail shortcuts. -- or -- Pick a default that suits the majority of your visitors based on the operating system statistics ...


6

For a long time, I only tested on Chrome/Firefox/Safari/IE/Opera on Windows, but about 2 years ago, I ran into a problem where the client was complaining about a screwed up layout on their Mac. I looked at the site in Adobe Browser Lab using OS X Safari and indeed it was rendering improperly compared to Safari for Windows. Ever since then, I've stopped ...


5

An escalator can never break, it can only become stairs. -Mitch Hedberg You should take a look at the concept of progressive enhancement: Progressive enhancement uses web technologies in a layered fashion that allows everyone to access the basic content and functionality of a web page, using any browser or Internet connection, while also providing ...


5

The Can I Use? website is excellent to determine browser support for various features, including HTML5 semantic tags: http://caniuse.com/html5semantic You'll see that IE8 and below let the team down. If you need to support IE6, 7, and 8, then using the HTML5 shiv is a good idea. IE8 is still in use by roughly 7% of visitors, according to StatCounter, but ...


5

The named character references added in HTML5 do not work cross-browser, though the support is relatively widespread now. Generally, there is hardly ever any reason to use them (as opposite to references defined in HTML 4.1, which are well supported). Quite independently of this, the characters themselves (no matter whether entered as such, as named ...


4

It really depends on your intended audience. But cutting out IE entirely is a massive market share! A commercial website should at least support IE8 (in some form) and later and degrade gracefully in older browsers. With progressive enhancement you should be able to support a fair range of browsers to some extent. For e-commerce sites where you are getting ...


4

In my testing, Firefox 41 and Chrome 45 are affected; IE 11 and Safari 8 are not. I have not tested other versions of these browsers. Apparently, when one page opens another in a new window/tab, they have some limited ability to interact with one another; in the child window, this is via the window.opener JavaScript object. [See "reverse tabnapping".] ...


4

It will resort to the default font of the browser. In this case with the sans-serif specification it would look for the default sans-serif font. I think for Windows this font is Arial, and for Mac it's Helvetica (don't quote me on that, it's been a long time since I've looked). If no sans-serif font exists on the machine, the browser will switch over to its ...


3

No, Segoe UI does not come bundled with Firefox. Segoe UI is the default for interface elements for Windows starting with Windows Vista and Microsoft Office 2007. So, Segoe UI and other Segoe variants can be obtained by installing Office 2007 or later, or Windows Vista or later. More information can be found here: https://www.microsoft.com/typography/...


3

As you seem to be approaching it, this is probably going to be futile. At best, you're going to come up with a very small list of combinations that don't conflict in the base browsers, then find out that there are plenty of add-ons that then go ahead and use them which are common enough to be a problem anyway. You should avoid the standard patterns like ...


3

A number of things need to be in place for this to work properly. First of all your page needs to say which text encoding it is using. You need this at the top if you haven't already: <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> The website user then needs to have a font installed which can display that character. You have ...


3

This - http://tlt.its.psu.edu/suggestions/international/bylanguage/ipachart.html - might be of help. If you use the code in HTML it should render properly on the front end.


3

With simple text, you can not guarantee font rendering to be pixel perfect. If you are worried about how the text looks for some users due to rendering artifacts, it should be up to the user at that point to fix their own system. Of course, since we can't rely on them to even know how to do that, let alone bother doing it, if you still wish to ensure pixel ...


3

I got a clue (kinda). The bad behavior depends on which method is used to smooth edges of screen fonts. If interested in how to access this setting see How do I get ClearType?. This setting impacts over every aspect of OS rendering, not just in browser. Possible value for this settings are: Disabled (fonts are really awful) Standard (better but still not ...


3

What platforms you test on should be based on your demographic not on other webmasters' preferences or subjective opinions. If your target audience lives in a country that still has widespread IE6 usage, or the client has specifically asked for IE6 support, then you'll need to support IE6. But for many sites out there, explicit support for IE6 is no longer ...


3

One major advantage of using PNGs is showing icons with more than one color. Also it's well supported by older browsers, althrough the IE 6 will have problems with transparent PNGs. You might want to check font icons vs png icons on StackOverflow for a good comparison.


3

AMP is just HTML/CSS/JS, that's why it works in all modern browsers. Browsers don't really "read AMP", they read HTML/CSS/JS because that's what AMP is comprised of. From the AMP documentation: AMP HTML is a subset of HTML for authoring content pages such as news articles in a way that guarantees certain baseline performance characteristics. [...] it ...


2

Actually with IE it's a bit easier because it let's you run it in compatibility mode for IE 7 and 8 and well as default 9. Just go to "Tools > F12 Developer Tools > Browser Mode" and select the version of IE you wish to run IE 9 under. I wouldn't recommend supporting IE 6 because even Microsoft is trying to get rid of it. As far as other browsers, I ...


2

Until recently it was becoming increasingly common to see mobile versions of websites, where the URL is entirely different, such as m.example.com or example.com/mobile. This is often more convenient than sending mobile users to the regular site, but it has drawbacks, such as complicating SEO, doubling the design code you have to maintain, and making it ...


2

Depending on the country, the browser usage is very different. In China, for instance, there is 22%+ IE6. When developing for old browsers, keep in mind that even if they support ajax and other fancy javascript stuff, they probably do it a lot slower than more modern browsers. We did a comparison for a customer project some time ago. IE6, compared to a ...


2

If you're providing the correct MIME or content types, then it shouldn't make any difference. I think aesthetically though, it's better to have extensions so that if a user wishes to download an image, their computer won't have any issues opening it, and the user would know off the bat what kind of image it is. (Sometimes you'd get a "image corrupt" error.) ...


2

I like to use Normalize.css whenever I possibly can on a new project. It's better than Eric Meyer's CSS Reset in that it actually provides "standardized" styles for elements, as opposed to removing all styles. So yes, it's a great starting point for a new project. You'll want to ensure that the framework or CMS your using won't conflict with it, but it's a ...


2

It's just a tool. You need to evaluate whether or not it's appropriate to use for yourself. For any given project, you might be using some other elements that conflict with it, for all we know. It's a handy library, but nobody can really make a blanket statement that you should/not use it for every project you do.


2

Almost certainly this is a bug in the software that is accessing your web site - a browser, a browser plugin, or a script/command-line program like wget. It's like someone tried to modify the User-agent header but instead pasted it inside a standard header. Unless the user's particular IP is causing problems overloading the server, there is no real action ...


2

Somebody answered one of my questions posting a link to this website. Check it out. I'm not sure if there's a service to preview interactions.


2

I read elsewhere that google chrome browser ignores cache-control sent by the server and uses a value of zero. Citation please? The only reference I found of this is a SO question (June 2012) that states that Chrome will override Cache-Control if the user specifically refreshes the page - which is understandable. This would also be strange since Google ...


2

Google option is good, but your best option is @font-face. It is supported in almost all browsers (except Opera Mini), which you can see on "can i use" and for the problem of some fonts being rendered differently on browsers, you just need to find the best settings for your font. Some browsers render light weight badly, like Lato on Chrome. Here are the ...


2

This is a glitch with the MIME types on the AdSense servers which occurred some time ago. Last time I spoke to Google about it I was told that it was being fixed but it still comes up on occasion. When this happens the only real solution is to disable adsense for a few days to give Google a chance to patch the AdSense servers and fix the issue, unfortunately ...


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