11

Wikipedia provides an updated browser statistics summary that includes the top sources and median of these sources: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Usage_share_of_web_browsers#Summary_table For most uses, the wikipedia median is probably your best estimate for accurate browser statistics. Each of the main browser stats providers are not 100% reliable ...


9

As explained in part by Google's "Why don't my web logs or third-party click auditing software match my AdWords report?" support article, Google AdWords and Google Analytics do not track traffic in the same way that WordPress or your web server logs will report. Your host may be presenting you with data for all requests, including JavaScript files, CSS ...


6

Google Analytics and Alexa have nothing to do with one another. Alexa is a relatively meaningless metric which only shows an approximate traffic rank based on only users that have their browser toolbar/extension/site script installed. It can only measure statistics based on their own userbase so the real accuracy of Alexa ranking is considerably wayward. ...


5

There are up-to-date stats at http://gs.statcounter.com/ Just select "Screen resolution" from the stat dropdown. At the time of this writing, it seems that 1366 * 768 is the rage.


5

If you are using WordPress you can use this plugin to display Visitor counts on your website http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/google-analyticator/ Includes a widget that can be used to display visitor stat information on the front-end


5

Due to the design/nature of the Internet such figures are really hard/impossible to obtain. There will be a lot of variance between countries/regions in countries in regards to time spent online, and which hours are spent online. Also definitions of Internet access are a little difficult to pin down. Is someone sending an email on their phone on the ...


5

Use the "Navigation Summary" to work out which internal page a visitor reached your page from: Choose 'Content' and then 'Content by Title' from the Analytics menu: Click whichever page title you're interesting in learning more about: Click the page URL in the Content Performance table: Click 'Navigation Summary' under the 'Navigation Analysis' header: ...


5

Follow the KISSMetrics guide The KISSMetrics blog has a detailed post titled, “How to (Finally) Make Web Analytics Work for You” that explains the process of evaluating exactly what's worth tracking. It breaks it down into the following steps: Identify business objectives. Specify website goals. Distinguish website Key Performance Indicators. Visitor ...


5

I don't have any data that directly correlates page speed with click thrus. However, this article shows how important page speed is in a variety of other areas and may be useful to you: Amazon: 100 ms delay caused a drop in revenue. Google: 400 ms delay caused a 0.59% decrease in search requests per user. Yahoo!: 400 ms delay caused a 5-9% ...


5

Why not use Google Analytics? It is the better way to view your traffic without a lot of scripts. You can make your account in seconds and only install some lines of code in your file (index). http://www.google.com/analytics/


5

Google Analytics can be used with single page applications. You can either use Events to track user behaviour, or you can register "virtual" page views in the same way that real pages get recorded in a multi-page site.


5

Users almost never resize a window while using your site. It is often possible for the resizing itself to cause problems. This is especially the case when you use JavaScript to calculate and set some sizes when the window loads. Some frameworks rely on that technique and it makes resized-on-the-fly window look pretty broken. When you are testing you ...


4

They'll get the IP, user agent and cookies from your users. If you're worried about using hosted analytics, you can look at hosting a program on your own servers to gather analytics such as Open Web Analytics.


4

If he has logs of his server traffic then all the information you need is in there, almost everything google analytics does can be pulled out of server logs (and more, there are some things like 404/500 error codes that GA cannot track). This was how analytics was done prior to page tagging. Google used to offer an updated version of the Urchin 5 log ...


4

Providing initial explanation re difference between server-side stats and online stats for the benefit of other users: Apache access log analyses all the traffic to your server. StatCounter tracks all the visits to your site. Your server gets a lot more traffic than your site, because server traffic includes all the visits from robots, spambots, crawlers ...


4

I know that referrer field can be changed.. but why? This is known as referrer spam - unfortunately, spammers caught on to the fact that some webmasters do not secure their automatically-generated stat reports and, as most report generators do not add nofollow to referrer links, it is possible to get a link from a number of domains simply by providing a ...


4

It depends on the type of redirect. If you have a Javascript or Meta Refresh redirect with Google Analytics running on that page, then Google might track the page if the pause between loading the page, loading the Google Analytics tracking script and the redirect is long enough. If you have a server redirect, then no Javascript code is actually triggered ...


4

No, unfortunately it's not literally 100,000 different people. More accurately, it's 100,000 different cookie values. A user can visit your site for the very first time and be counted with a first unique visit, but if they clear their cookies, or log in from a different computer, or do private browsing, then a subsequent visit would be "unique" again. So ...


3

And here's another tool: Google Insights for Search it helps you to compare search volume patterns across specific regions, categories, time frames and properties.


3

You can also use the Google Adwords Tool


3

It's highly doubtful any engine will provide actual numbers for this information, but Google Trends does provide enough to get a feel for a term's recent performance. Whether that's useful will obviously depend upon how precise you really want this information to be.


3

You should start by asking yourself what the most usefull information is you can present your client. Then, make sure your presentation of the results leads to recommendations. Showing and discussing data can be fun and interesting, but actually using it to steer the purpose of the website should be you and your client's priority. Do you have any KPI (key ...


3

This is normally handled using session variables. When the user enters the site for the first time, a session is created. Every time you view view an article or a page, the site checks whether the id of the page is stored in the session variable. If it isn't, then the view is counted and the id stored in the session variable. Otherwise, the view count is ...


3

This isn't really a question you can throw out generically like this. You need to make the decision based on your content and whether you want or need the extra control the PDF format can get you. (The fact you're asking suggests probably not, though.) I'd personally say that the whole "print as PDF" thing is a bit of a historical hold-over that's ...


3

On a blog, there are few reasons to offer a PDF download of the current page. The sort of content you might want to offer as a PDF tends to be content you've created yourself in a dedicated print design application such as Adobe InDesign. Good reasons to offer PDFs: Your audience may want to save the content for later reference, but it spans multiple web ...


3

If your sites are utility company websites could the traffic spikes be related to billing cycles - are the companies putting out the url on print material around that time?


3

You could just use Google Analytics to log the data, then pull the data out of the reporting api; this would save you a lot of hassle as most of the logging and data processing will be done for you by Google.


3

If you're using wordpress then there is the 'Google Analytics Popular Posts', which pretty much does what it says on the tin. 'SubZane Google Analytics Plugin' does the same thing, there is also a decent tutorial if you'd like to get your hands dirty. Afraid I can't help with ROR, but this functionality should be available in one or more of the popular Ruby ...


3

What is the reason behind the different numbers, even when the data is quite trivial like unique visitors and page loads? Google Analytics requires a Javascript callback to Google's domain and will not record traffic from users with Javascript disabled or the majority of bots. AWStats is literally reading your webserver's logs and will record (in one ...


3

I think these are very generic statistics determined by some sort of unknown logic: The column after the Activity is Pages/v which I assume is "Pages Per Visit (average). The low/medium/high activity titles are probably determined by the number of pages a visitor browses in one session. This is where the "unknown logic" comes in. These numbers likely mean ...


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