9

Microsoft recently released their own tool for testing compatibility with the IEs. It's supposed to make that process easier. It's called Modern.ie: http://www.modern.ie/


7

I can confirm the observation, using IE 9 on Win 7. Checking in the IE settings (Tools → Internet settings → General → Fonts), I can see BatangChe mentioned as the font under “user defined” for normal text, and the font used for serif looks like Batang Che but has different spacing. And setting fonts there does not seem to change this. I guess they only ...


6

StartCom are in the Microsoft list of root certificate issuers. The process whereby the certificates get updated is described here. In brief - the certificates used by IE are recognised by the operating system, not on the browser version. If this IE6 is on XP, and the XP machine received Windows updates, then it could be that they weren't recognised in 2010, ...


6

No. The href must point to an absolute URI. Relative is not allowed on a base element. This attribute specifies an absolute URI that acts as the base URI for resolving relative URIs. The HTML5 standard says, in reference to the href attribute of <base>: The document base URL of a Document object is the absolute URL


5

Testing with browser modes that IE8 & IE9 provide is not the same as testing compatibility in lower versions of the actual browser. It is just an emulation. Even Microsoft wants to kill IE6. In several countries around the world, IE6 usage is dropping to less than 1%. So it's no surprise that it doesn't provide IE6 emulation.


5

Microsoft has now launched modern.ie, a website dedicated to testing web pages in Internet Explorer. It includes downloads of virtual machines for testing (although not currently for IE 6): http://www.modern.ie/en-us/virtualization-tools


5

The Can I Use? website is excellent to determine browser support for various features, including HTML5 semantic tags: http://caniuse.com/html5semantic You'll see that IE8 and below let the team down. If you need to support IE6, 7, and 8, then using the HTML5 shiv is a good idea. IE8 is still in use by roughly 7% of visitors, according to StatCounter, but ...


4

Try http://utilu.com/IECollection/ You can install IE 5,6,7,8 side by side on a windows machine or virtualbox windows machine.


4

You're conflating two seperate functions for two different audiences. Developers can use meta tags to force IE to render similarly to an older version:- <meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="IE=EmulateIE7" > Users can click the compatibility view button in the browser front end, which forces IE to render similarly to it's previous version e.g....


3

Microsoft provides, freely and without registration, virtual machines for: IE8 on Win7 IE9 on Win7 IE10 on Win7 IE11 on Win7 IE11 on Win81 Edge on Win10 For the following platform: VirtualBox Vagrant HyperV VPC VMware Parallels


3

file:/// will open a file on your drive or network drive using the OS. When using http:// you're telling the browser that this is a hypertext link to a file located on the Internet, not locally. You're likely seeing the parameters after several tries because IE is just saving your history. Also, having a ? in the URL implies you have some server-side ...


3

IE8's compatibility mode makes it render as IE7, so you'd need to use conditional comments which would allow you to add IE7 specific CSS that 'fixes' any bugs you see when the page renders. E.g:- <!--[if IE 7]> <style><!-- insert styles here --></style> <![endif]--> IE8's various meta tag configurations are listed in this msdn ...


3

I'm using the spoon.net browser sandbox - http://spoon.net/Browsers. It lets you run IE6-9 on your computer without having to install them. They also have the browser console and work with the IE developer toolbar, which helps with css/javascript debugging.


3

The Microsoft documentation for Internet Explorer prefetch indicates that IE prefetches links with certain rel values. Specifically rel="prerender" rel="prefetch" rel="dns-prefetch" However there is also a note on the page that indicates that it may prefetch "flip ahead targets" specified with rel=next. Note Internet Explorer also supports the "next" ...


3

I suggest you don't put 20.000 rows of data on the screen. My very basic workstation will crash because of the amount of data, regardless of the browser. 80MB is a lot, especially if it's html! Parsing so much is quite intens. I suggest you make something with a prev/next-page functionallity, I doubt the user requires all 20.000 lines on their screen at ...


2

The average user may be on anything from a small cellphone to a 4k television. You should therefore design your website to run on any size screen, intelligently. Usually this is referred to as 'responsive' design, and there are a lot of great frameworks that'll help you do that (Bootstrap, Zhurb Foundation, HTML5 Boilerplate). On small screens, hide "...


2

Use the following search pattern, this is remove the personalization to some extent http://www.google.com/search?&q=keyword&pws=0 For example if I am have to search micromax tablet, then I will write it as http://www.google.com/search?&q=micromax+tablet&pws=0


2

There are no tools for this (making sure your HTML and CSS validates are the best you can do). To effectively troubleshoot this you need to know the limitations, bugs, and quirks of each version of IE. Caniuse.com will tell you what version of IE supports which browser technology. Reading StackOverflow and Googling "IE bugs" will be very enlightening. (I ...


2

Microsoft provides lots of useful tools and virtual machines at modern.ie and they included IE10 too. All you need to do is going to that site and download the right one for your system.


2

Fixing your HTML validation errors will actually bring you a long way to solving your problem. There are probably only about 4 "critical" errors, and most of the others are as a result of these few. To get you started... Line#10 - You have an erroneous double quote inside your content attribute: <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, ...


2

Ok, so we have confirmed that our calculations were incorrect. Our provider was giving us reports based on the number of "visits". A visit is calculated based on the amount of time a user spends on our website. However, IE7 users might be rare but they might spend more time on a website compared to a Chrome user. This meant that the percentage we were going ...


2

If you change the parameter on the end of a URL, browsers will "know" not to cache the result. Rather than change the name of the PDF you can just add a parameter onto the end of the URL that references it. First: foo.pdf?revDate=20130916 and then foo.pdf?revDate=20131007 etc.


2

If you've got some kind of control over said site you should indicate the file is not to be cached by stating so in the headers. The basic headers (in pseudo, for HTML/1.1) you'd need would be: Pragma: no-cache Cache-Control: no-cache, must-revalidate Expires: {current_time} For more info on the first two headers look at RFC2616 14.32 Pragma and 14.9 ...


2

For initial testing in IE this may be sufficient, but there will always be some differences between how a site loads in an emulator to the real thing. The amount of testing you do should really be strategically influenced by the target user base and the amount of traffic the site receives. By using a web analytics tool such as Google Analytics or Piwik (...


2

ZDNet posted on 29th December that Spartan is still going to use Microsoft's Chakra JavaScript engine and Microsoft's Trident rendering engine (not WebKit or gecko), Sources say. Source : http://www.zdnet.com/article/microsoft-is-building-a-new-browser-as-part-of-its-windows-10-push/ So it is the same engine polished a little. Nothing fancy.


2

I suggest you don't drive them away as they are potential customers/followers/visitors. Placing warnings and headers about old browsers isn't gonna change much other than changing the feeling people will experience at your site. There are two kinds of people who use old browsers: Those who don't understand computers; They won't update because they don;t ...


1

According to this article: https://www.smashingmagazine.com/2015/05/testing-for-windows-phone/ As Microsoft acknowledged in the past, the version of Internet Explorer found on mobile devices is similar but not identical to the desktop browser version. There are a few key features that are not available on Windows Phone: HTML5 touch drag-and-drop ...


1

As far as I know, the Internet Explorer found on Windows Phone uses the same engine as the desktop version of IE. I think the only difference between them is the viewport/screen sizes that they'll be viewed on. I think really you can test mobile sites on the desktop version of IE the same way you would with Safari, just resize the screen.


1

I believe that vmware player supports Windows 8, You should then be able to test the following setups, of course not limited too and only an example: Windows XP IE6 Windows XP IE7 Windows XP IE8 Windows 7 IE9 Windows 7 IE10


1

Do you have access to the application files? If so you can place a custom.css file after the last .css file in the header. CSS cascades and the last CSS styles/classes are ones which take effect most times. !important may be needed to override any inline styled elements or possibly some ID's. You can override CSS for IE browsers only using condotional ...


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