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Moving my answer from Stack Overflow where your question was off-topic This is a very unusual suggestion - I've never once seen any of the SEO experts even hint at something like this. It sounds like something that used to work years ago - a bit like keyword stuffing - and could be considered to be a "black hat" these days. It certainly doesn't ...


6

In general, if a link only contains an image, the alt attribute of that image should not describe the image but the link target. With image maps, it’s the same. The alt attribute of the img element should describe the whole image (as the image itself is not linked). The alt attribute of the area element should describe its purpose (as this image area is ...


5

The "problem" is that the domain name does not pass the "radio test". If you advertise it on TV or in print media, people should remember it correctly, although there may be a small percentage who won't. So it's a branding issue mainly. In terms of perception by end users, it also suggests that you fell back on whatever was available ...


4

Your goal is excellent, and I think the approach you are looking for is already existent in CSS as @media and display. One option HTML <a href="#" class="menu_links"><span class="hidetext">Graphic </span>Design</a> CSS @media screen { span.hidetext { display: none; } } @media aural { span.hidetext { display: inline; } } ...


4

What the tool seems to intend is to make sure that the contrast is high enough, but it’s beyond me why it assumes (for some elements) white as default for the foreground and the background. The contrast check should only be done for elements for which the author specifies colors, and assume some sensible default colors (e.g., those used by browsers and other ...


3

I think it actually makes quite a lot of sense. Here are some cases, were I think this would be usefull: The Title of your side is a heading (e.g. name of the company, should maybe even be the topmost h1). This would be similar to the Logo of your side, and it’s usually convention to link this to the homepage/main url of your site You have a list of posts/...


3

There's a free screen reader program for Windows called NVDA. It can be downloaded here: https://www.nvaccess.org/download/ Macs come with a screen reader program called Voiceover, WebAIM has an article on how to use it: http://webaim.org/articles/voiceover/ I found it very enlightening as a sighted person to try navigating some websites via a screen ...


3

alt="Screenshot 1", alt="Screenshot 2" would be about the same as not having anything at all. You can find information on all of your questions here: https://moz.com/learn/seo/alt-text Some context from the page about alt text uses: Adding alternative text to photos is first and foremost a principle of web accessibility. Visually impaired users using ...


3

Imagine you have a camera manual printed on paper. You can have a diagram of all elements on page 1, this diagram is figure no. 1. On page 16 you can write "look at figure No. 1" This implies that a figure can be on another part of the page because you need to have it on that other part of the page. But for the SEO point of view, a figure can have (and ...


3

I don't see any reason that breaking the titles like this could boost SEO in any measurable way. The general rule of thumb for SEO is that if it makes no sense to have your page set up some way and it goes against web standards, it's probably bad not just for SEO but for your site at large (you've already discovered that it's bad for accessibility). Good SEO ...


2

This. is. crap. I've long catered to the blind community. I use alt on all my images and have always done so. I expand every abbr. I use accessibility web "checkers" and validators. I bend over backward to provide an accessible site. But, this stuff has to stop. Per the blog post listed above. While it might seem that the nav tag would defining the nav ...


2

What is not visible to users (ever) is not taken into account by Google for ranking. Hidding SFM_Tooltip is not a solution. One option in your case is to put keywords in your image's filename. Google searches for information in filenames. Another solution is to display text if someone clicks on the image. This text will be discounted for rankings since it ...


2

What is the reason for placing text in an image rather than having it loaded in the HTML? You generally want all your text crawled to be used for visitors and crawlers. Look at the clean cache of the page and use the "Fetch as Google" tool in GWT to see what Googlebot sees. Here is how your page currently looks to Googlebot: http://webcache.googleusercontent....


2

The relevant guideline from WCAG 1.0 Level A is: Ensure that pages are usable when scripts, applets, or other programmatic objects are turned off or not supported. If this is not possible, provide equivalent information on an alternative accessible page. Providing a <noscript> section is one way to approach this guideline, but it isn't a very good ...


2

If you duplicate the text on the same page and change visibility depending on the viewer/screenreader you don't have to worry IF you make sure that search engines are allowed to read your CSS/JS files. Some websites are blocking CSS/JS for bots. That would make the text seem duplicated since Google wouldn't "see" that you are hiding text. This is what you ...


2

You can style alt text. You can make alt text bold, add a background or change its color. You can also add linebreaks. I don't think it's possible to make some words bold and some words normal, but if there's a solution I'd like to have it as well. Here is an example: <img src="foo.jpg" alt="Line 1 Line 2" /> <br><br> <img src="foo.jpg"...


2

Honestly i don't see how to utilize sr-only for your purpose. But adding the text to both of alt and title attributes (<img src="" alt="your content" title="your content") will finally do the job.


2

They don't have metric score values like the Performance Score. Each Accessibility test is a simple pass or fail with the particular category's weight contributing too the final score out of 100 for the Accessibility assessment The Accessibility score is a weighted average of all the accessibility audits. See Scoring Details for a full list of how each ...


2

Three and a half months later I have come back to this with an entirely satisfactory solution. I was unaware of this when I posted the question above in March 2020, but way back in 2011, the W3C included this section in its then-working-draft of HTML5: Sequential link types Some documents form part of a sequence of documents. A sequence of documents is one ...


2

In terms of SEO, this should make no difference whatsoever. Search engines rank content based on many factors, but whether the content is wrapped in quotes is not something that matters.


2

In one word the answer would be NO. But adding keyword in header helps user to understand about the topic/page. For helping in SEO you must follow Google's guidelines. As @FluffyKiten said: It certainly doesn't meet Google's (admittedly vague) guidelines


2

NO. This misses the point of SEO. By breaking up linguistic data across multiple "environments", the information is artificially "out of context" for Google's algorithms and presents difficulties for interpretation and categorization. In the "big picture" Google wants your content to be useful for people, so context is important....


2

The simple answer is "not really." The real answer is, "it depends." Search engines don't care what your site looks like. If you use a light font on a light background that makes the text hard to read, they don't care. If the site is as ugly as a kid's first website from 1995, they don't care. A visually hideous site can rank highly for a ...


1

Apart from the need for captions, which might be met by YouTube's auto-captioning, the other issue with meeting WCAG 2.0 (or 2.1) at AA or AAA is the requirement under criterion 1.2.5 to provide audio descriptions if your video track contains any extra information or context needed to understand the audio. Unfortunately, as of this reply YouTube does not ...


1

From my reading of the WCAG 2.0 guidelines, closed-captions are enough to meet some of the guidelines at Level A, however Level AAA (and possibly AA also?) appear to require a text alternative that is not time-based, meaning you need to provide a text transcript that the user can read at their own pace (unlike captions, which forces the user to read quite ...


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Here's a site I use for stuff like this sometimes. It's not aimed at accessibility, per se, but it's a good way to see how your site renders on various platforms. http://browsershots.org/ If you need further assistance with font-sizing, check this out: https://medium.com/@madhum86/css-font-sizing-pixels-vs-em-vs-rem-vs-percent-vs-viewport-units-...


1

I would recommend using the <caption> element. It serves a very similar purpose to the summary attribute. <caption> is visible by default, but you can position it off screen using CSS to make it visible only to screen readers.


1

WAI-ARIA are attributes that can make your Web site/app (more) accessible. This has nothing to do with SEO¹. If you use HTML5, you are already using WAI-ARIA, as many elements come with default implicit ARIA semantics (example). You should add WAI-ARIA attributes if you are re-purposing an element, or if you can’t use an appropriate semantic element, or ...


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