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17

To know the age of an URL you can follow this link by replacing www.example.com by the URL you want: https://www.google.com/search?tbs=cdr%3A1%2Ccd_min%3A1%2F1%2F2000&q=site%3Ahttp%3A%2F%2Fwww.example.com&safe=active&gws_rd=ssl For example, here's the result from Google for the Meta site of Stack Overflow: Otherwise, the Wayback machine is ...


11

(A similar question got closed as duplicate, but the OP was not exclusively interested in SEO, so here comes an answer about general benefits.) Including the publication date in the URL can be good URL design. Usability: descriptive URLs An URL can give clues about the content it refers to. Giving users such information before they click at the link is a ...


8

Zistoloen found a way to have Google display the date when it first indexed the content of the page. I'm adding it to my answer as well because I think I can explain it more clearly. Search Google for something that brings up the page you want as a result Use "Search Tools" Select "Custom Range..." from the "Any time" drop down Put in a large date range ...


6

Historically, Google said they ignored structured data which was not used to markup visible content. Because your snippet shows both date published and date updated as visible on-page content but the Moz example shows date published as non-visible meta data, I'd try tweaking that and seeing if it works to get Google to show the last update date instead.


5

I don't know of any SEO benefit from having dates in URLs and I doubt these sites have used this structure for SEO, its simply the URL structure they have chosen, probably from a usability point of view. For example, in WordPress (the CMS techcrunch is on) one of the default permalink (URL) settings is to have dates in the URLs. Here is a video from Matt ...


4

You could provide both dates. To make the difference machine-readable, you could use these Schema.org properties (e.g., for a BlogPosting): dateCreated The date on which the CreativeWork was created. datePublished Date of first broadcast/publication. And, if you prefer, also: dateModified The date on which the CreativeWork was most recently modified.


4

There may not be any way to find out when an arbitrary web page was first indexed by Google — certainly I don't know of any way to do so. It's possible that Google simply does not store that information, since there's no real reason why they'd need to. Besides, even if they do store this information, they really have no particular reason to make it ...


4

dateModified always has a potential value (there's always something you could set) and can be equal to or later than dateCreated. ‘Creating is modifying’ and a good example of this is the filesystem on whatever OS you're using — creating a file sets the dateCreated and the dateModified together, then subsequent edits change the dateModified. Whether or not ...


3

I think 23:59:59 is the way to go. Check this answer about similar problem.


3

This can be accomplished by using Structured Data. You can use something like the following to set the update date: <span class="entry-date updated"><?php echo get_the_date(); ?></span> This is a WordPress example but the concept is the same. You can also put the update date in your meta description. This could help with conversations as ...


3

Originally, the date was used in URLs for technical reasons. In WordPress blogs for example, the date is used as a numeric lookup in the database which is easier to index and generally faster than looking up a long string only. It also ensures a unique URL when you use the same title for different posts. While a post ID could be a valid candidate, I believe ...


3

It is impossible. The registries manage the data. What wou see through whois is just a read-only view of part of their database. So it is not specifically whois that is relevant here, but just the registries' data and their handling of it. When a registry receive a domain registration order (typically from a registrar) it will then create a new record in ...


2

Hidden content is fine as long as you have a way of accessing that information... To extend on Johns answer you can hide content from both users and search engines if the content can be viewed by a action. What this means is any content that is hidden must have a way of being viewed by both users and search engines. Ideal CSS Method This can be done in ...


2

Don't show content only to search engines and not to users. This is called cloaking is a violation of the search engines terms of service. If this content is never going to be seen by users then you should remove it from the HTML completely.


2

I agree that there is no SEO benefit to showing dates in an URL path, and want to point out that URL structures like this may create an SEO disadvantage. Your display URL in google SERPS is truncated after a max of 70 about characters. It's arguable that adding numbers (dates) to the URL string dilutes the semantic readability of the URL and the perceived ...


2

There is no SEO benefit to put date in URL because search engines and users like short URLs. The only reason I see is to avoid duplicate URL problems (even if for this kind of problem, I prefer use an id in the URL).


2

Google cannot rely upon dates provided by web servers or content and never has. Let me explain how this works. When Google finds a page, the creation date (drawing a parallel) where Google calls the date the inception date, is the date and time the page is discovered. If there are two identical pages on the web and Google finds one, that is the original. It ...


2

Here's the final mark-up I have on my page: <div itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Article"> <meta itemprop="datePublished" content="2014-05-09T05:40:51+01:00"> ... Page goes here... <time itemprop="dateModified" datetime="2015-02-22T14:55:06+00:00">Last Updated: 22 Feb 15</time> </div> Which gives me a ...


2

I think a publication date should never¹ change. It’s, as the name suggests, the date of the publication, not the date of the last change to the published content. If you want to indicate that you edited the content, provide a (last) modification date. This difference can be conveyed with structured data: Schema.org offers the properties datePublished and ...


2

If you don’t want it to be visible, use meta. If you want it to be visible, use time. <meta itemprop="datePublished" content="2016-01-07"> Last updated: <time itemprop="dateModified" datetime="2016-08-17">2016-01-07</time> The div elements don’t affect the Microdata (unless they have Microdata attributes themselves, of course). Option 3: ...


2

The issue turned out to be the colon in header_name = "last-modified:" Basically, there were two colons in the ngnix config file, which lead Chrome to throw an error (Firefox, on the other hand, ignores this and renders the page). The header_name should simply be header_name = "last-modified"


2

Your regular expression is pretty close if you remove the $s. Those means "ends with," which isn't what you want. I'd take the approach of having a single "starts with slash" (^/) followed by your dates with parenthesis for grouping, and explicitly say it can end with anything (.* ): ^/((2019/03/01)|(2019/03/02)|(2019/03/03))/.* That should work with ...


2

There are two important points around URLs that are relevant: Keywords in the URL don't matter much at all for SEO right now. Having the year in the URL isn't going help you rank better. Stable, unchanging URLs are best for SEO. Having the year in the URL makes you change the URL every year. Having the year in the URL is not good for SEO. This is a ...


1

My pages are clear video (at least apparently) and other dates. In my case google writes the date of first publication. To me the code is the same as yours, the dates in my template are these: and then in the content: 23 November 2016 The date view on google SERP instead is 4 hours ago (or the first date of publication). If it worked would have to write ...


1

I had the same problem with landing pages. The problem in my case was that Google was showing the publication date of embedded media I had on the page. Does your page show a video of any sort? If so, check the publication date of that video and see if it corresponds with the publication date. If this was your problem and you want to learn more you can ...


1

Ok, so I think I've found the answer and will just post here to maybe help someone with a similar problem in the future. Basically, Google would not be showing a publication date in the SERPS that it plucked out of the sky. Knowing that, I checked my copy, my images and my entire html to see if the (wrong) date had crept in somewhere. Viewing the source ...


1

It is normal for bloggers to update existing posts with new information. If you have set the permalink of your blog to reflect the date of the post, then changing the date could change the URL of the post as well. If you have existing links pointing to the URL, then you might notice a temporary drop in the ranks of that page till the time the link equity is ...


1

Google should recognize the date automatically. Your posts look pretty new, so perhaps it takes some time. When I google a search for frostali.blogspot.co.id it says "6 days ago".


1

You have to use the Rich snipped property "datePublished" in the HTML template of your articles Example: <meta itemprop="datePublished" content="2015-02-05T08:00:00+08:00"/> <meta itemprop="dateModified" content="2015-02-05T09:20:00+08:00"/> Please find the folling Documentation https://developers.google.com/search/docs/data-types/articles#...


1

One of the primary places Google looks for a date for any given page is in the URL. If a date is found in the URL, it is considered to be a strong indicator over most if not all other sources including within the response header. From this answer: How to tell how old a page is? 4] Google looks for a date within the URL. It looks for the following ...


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