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The connection speed our webapp is showing (from my office) is much slower than my connection speed to a SpeedTest.net site in the same city.

I can test my internet using SpeedTest.net to Houston (where our server is): 37 Mb/s And we have a built in test in our app which shows 3.5 Mb/s

I'd like to test both "houston" and $ourDomain with the SAME service. But all I can find are sites that test the actual page, which I assume introduces a lot of extra variables.

closed as off-topic by Rob, Stephen Ostermiller Aug 1 at 14:27

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    "But all I can find are sites that test the actual page" - you could try uploading a large file and test that "page"? – MrWhite Apr 14 '15 at 14:33
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    SpeedTest.net have a cli client that should neatly sidestep the 'extra variables', so if you have SSH access you might try that instead. – Tom Brossman Apr 15 '15 at 17:22
  • @w3d if you post that as an Answer, I'll mark it. That combiend with the Pingdom Real User Test should do the trick. Instead of just doing a Ping Test every x minutes, it'll actually do a Real user Test regularly: pingdom.com/rum – Clay Nichols Apr 16 '15 at 22:04
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You can use various tools to do this,

All of the websites above will show your website's speed and how you could improve, the services are also able to use their infrastructure to provide accurate results from various countries around the world as well as different browsers and how your website may appear.

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    Although the OP seems to just want the "connection speed" (traffic throughput), not the performance of the site itself? – MrWhite Apr 14 '15 at 15:38
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But all I can find are sites that test the actual page, which I assume introduces a lot of extra variables.

Yes, this is also going to test the performance of your server (page generation, database lookups etc). As mentioned in comments, you could try uploading a large file and test that by making a direct request for the file (the file being the "page") and thus minimising the stress on the server? Although this is still measuring the servers initial response and its ability to stream the file. Bare in mind also that the connection might not be the same speed in both directions?

You also mentioned a Pingdom "Real User Test" that might help.

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There's a few options for you. Take a look:

enter image description here

WGET and CURL are installed with some linux distributions. WGET is convenient as it reports the average speed of a download. They can be run on your server if it has linux with the standard utilities installed. That way, you can measure the speed from your server to anything that's remote to it.

Ping also works, but you'll only know how long it takes to get any sort of answer from a remote server.

If you prefer to test a connection to your server, you can use the same utilities if the client machine has linux. If the client uses windows, then tests can be made with ping. Also, clients can test speeds to any server when using the opera browser as it always reports statistics while the page is loading.

Everything is shown in the large image.

  • Do not post images of code, errors or output. – Rob Aug 1 at 11:52

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