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I'm working on a web-app which has a nice, AngularJS based, front-end for when javascript is enabled and then falls back to a completely Javascript free, 100% server rendered version for when it isn't, with an identical URL schema.

One of the things I do is have a banner at the top of the page stating:

Website Name Here works best on a modern browser with Javascript enabled

I then use Angular's one-time binding feature to hide it. ie, once AngularJS, kicks in, the banner goes away.

I don't want to use the noscript tag, because I am also delivering a mostly JS free version of the site to bots/web crawlers and users on older browsers (based on user agent, I sometimes don't render the scripts to load the AngularJS and related javascript), so this notification will be missed if soembody visits on IE8, for example, if the notification is in a noscript tag.

Will this hurt my SEO? And could this warning potentially show up in Google/Bing/etc search results for items my site may rank otherwise highly on?

Or is this a common practice, and will any decent web crawler take this kind of notification into account?

Thanks

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    This isn't going to affect SEO at all. I wouldn't worry about it for another second. – John Conde Sep 11 '15 at 19:16
  • @JohnConde good to know, care to expand that into an answer? Very interesting – JMK Sep 11 '15 at 19:18
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    It's common to do this with JavaScript heavy sites. It's so insignificant in terms of content, and is clearly not malicious. It's really no different then, let's say, using display:none for a fly out menu. Hopefully that makes sense. – John Conde Sep 11 '15 at 19:20
  • It does indeed, thanks! Again, if that was an answer I would give you a green tick :) – JMK Sep 11 '15 at 19:25
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    This very site does the same thing... "Webmasters Stack Exchange works best with JavaScript enabled" - although this bit of text appears at the very end of the source code and is only displayed at the top with CSS. – MrWhite Sep 11 '15 at 19:30
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It's common to do this with JavaScript heavy sites. It's so insignificant in terms of content, and is clearly not malicious. It's really no different then, let's say, using display:none for a fly out menu.

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