0

I know how to program in basic java. Before learning java, I studied HTML. Quite frankly, I forgot it, and it seems to me that it is going to be a hassle updating my HTML code every time I write an article (I want to make a blog like website where I can write articles on popular trends and political debates). So, a thought popped into my head. The thought was "Why don't I just host a filesystem where all my articles are just .txt files?" I know it wouldn't be the prettiest look of them all, but that should be easier to make and navigate than any website I can make. Then I remembered, maybe I can find a host that will host an SSH or FTP like server, where an outside user is logged into a "guest" account, so they cannot modify anything, but they can view the files. Like for example, when they open the remote database, they would see a readme file and a folder leading to different topics of my essays. They would navigate through an index (Like you know, when you remove part of the link, it will show you an index of the directory?) where they would pick photos and .txt files to view from their browser. I feel like that would be easier to setup that to make an actual HTML website, but is it actually possible with any modern host networks?

closed as primarily opinion-based by dan Jun 15 '17 at 2:33

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2

Yes. Just don't use default index files for the server. In a typical apache server setup, the default files are normally index.html and index.htm and maybe index.php depending on how the server is setup.

Better yet, don't create a file that begins with "index.". Then when someone accesses your domain they will see a file and folder listing and the page title will be something along the lines of "Index of (insert folder name here)".

  • P.S. OP, I don't know if you know this, but the document root folder is where you should begin storing your public-facing files. – Mike Jun 15 '17 at 2:33
  • 1
    It seems to me that the OP isn't talking about using a web server per se' but anything where people can view text files. BTW- Good to see you! Cheers!! – closetnoc Jun 15 '17 at 3:19
  • if it doesn't work not having an index file, check your .htaccess file for a line "Options -Indexes" and delete it or comment it out by placing a # at the beginning of the line – Steve Jun 15 '17 at 6:37

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.