9

There's nothing saying you can't use JPEG but generally PNG's are better because of several factors: Most page based elements such as tabs and icons compress far Superior than JPEG. PNG is a lossless compression format Jpeg doesn't support transparency (the main issue, most page elements contain the need for transparency). Generally PNG files will compress ...


8

It's not that PNG is better for sprites, it's that PNG is better for the types of images people normally use sprites for (buttons, icons etc.). You can use any web-suitable image format for sprites. Imagine you have a staff page on your company website that lists 10 or so staff members with a small photo alongside each one. If you wanted to speed up this ...


7

Joey, you asked several questions there, some answers are going to be personal preference, some others I have done myself and think they might apply to you as well. So, here it goes: Deal with it The web changes. A lot. Work done several years ago cannot and should not apply today. I have no clue on how many work references you have, but assuming you are ...


7

The good: You like the way it looks. It makes it easy to identify your blog (uniqueness). The bad: Check the file size. Large images can slow down the site. I'd try to limit it to 150KB. It ends up being the branding for your website (what makes your website identifiable), but it looks rather generic. You probably want to brand your website more ...


7

Text/content is usually hidden for one of two reasons: That content should not be displayed until a certain event occurs (i.e. a user performs an action like clicking on a link or pressing a button). That content is only necessary for users who have special needs (e.g. accessibility). I didn't review swiss.com but based on the snippets you posted it looks ...


6

It seems to me that you have nothing to lose in contacting your old client to see if they require work to be done to their website. You will achieve nothing by not asking and it could be profitable if you do. You don't have to be so blunt by saying "your site looks terrible", simply regaining contact and enquiring about work could be sufficient. You cannot ...


5

Technically, you can get sued (at least in the United States). The logo images are owned by social networks. They have copyright on them. You have to have a licence for to use them at all. (Generally, the sites give a licence to use them for social sharing buttons when unaltered.) They generally have policies against modifying the logo images in any way: ...


4

This is a bit tricky to answer. There are obviously some big differences between displaying your page offline to online (in your test server). All URL paths (root-relative, absolute and even relative) are going to be different depending on your setup. Content-Type headers (normally sent from the server) could differ, so files are interpreted differently, etc....


4

Google requires that sites be up and running with a representative sample of content before they are approved for Google AdSense. At least 30 pages of content (for example 30 blog posts) with complete sentences and paragraphs Enough text content for content matching to work (not just images, videos, or Flash) No "under construction", "beta", or "coming ...


4

First of all, there's a 3rd option. You can serve a dedicated mobile site on separate URLs, e.g., m.example.com, or you can take an adaptive approach whereby mobile specific content is delivered on the same URLs as your "desktop" site. Which option is best for users? From a design and architecture point of view, which is best depends a lot on what your ...


4

You could have a look for some kind of PDF to HTML converter and perhaps this question on Stackoverflow might help? However, I have not tried something like this myself and I would be very sceptical as to the quality of the HTML/CSS produced. An automated tool might be able to make it look acceptable, but there is a lot more to creating a web page than ...


4

You will never find an application that does the job perfectly but their are some PDF to HTML convertors online that can convert simple to fairly complex PDF designs. The other option would be to pay a designer to take the PDF design and make it into a friendly HTML design that works as intended, AI/PDF/SVG > HTML convertors are not perfect and sometimes ...


4

As a rule, what makes sense for semantic markup and accessibility usually also makes sense for SEO, and you should certainly not damage usability or code quality for the sake of any SEO that Google have not recommended to webmasters. On-site SEO should be about helping Google index your site thoroughly and accurately, and not trying to find loopholes in ...


4

You can literality use any font you choose regardless whether or not they have the font installed on their OS. This is done by using CSS @font-face which informs the users browser to download the font to their device. However the font needs to be served as multiple compatible web font formats because different operating systems use different formats. This ...


4

You have a couple options, each with its own implication / visibility. As you mentioned, have a blank or simple logo html file. Note you can have this return either a 200, or as a customized 404 page, so the visitor sees the blank or simple logo page, but to the search engine it is viewed as a 404. If you do want this to leave a bread crumb to you ...


3

It sounds like what you're describing are microsites. You might find that the reaction to this idea is not very good. See this for more as to why: Microsites. A Bad Idea Most of the Time, as referenced by Matt Cuts in his video discussing them here: What's your opinion on microsites? As covered in those, a few microsites may not impact your SEO results, ...


3

Unless a lawyer comes along that knows about the appropriate law in your jurisdiction then all you're going to get is people's opinion. Take a look around on the web, literally countless websites use their own themed social media icons as you say. Unless you're trying to imply some sort of affiliation or endorsement then I don't see what a social media ...


3

The Waiting time is the big problem here. This is the time your web server takes to generate the HTML page once it has received the request. Long waiting times are generally a result of the server needing to do a lot of processing to create the page - for example fetching information from a database or from an external web service. EDIT: You need to find ...


3

The best thing to do here is inspect the source code. I notice right away each block has -webkit-transform assigned to it. For example: -webkit-transform: translate3d(288px, 0px, 0px); As can be seen in this screenshot: Then, I found the class isotope-image assigned to the div. A quick Google search turns up: http://isotope.metafizzy.co/demos/layout-...


3

This method of deploying a newer version of a prior established website to a different domain is very much flawed as you've probably come to realize now from comments and posts above, mainly relating to the issues of Page Rank effect of aged domain and index history, the duplicate content issue and the 301 redirects. I would strongly recommend your next ...


3

Compelling and valuable content. Some of the best sites ever still do not do social media, blogging, forums, etc. It not only about good content but compelling content and valuable content. A user has to have a reason to come back over and over again. From there organic backlinks. Lot's of organic backlinks. Social media helps along with blogs, forums, etc....


3

This is a subject that could end up on discussions, but I'd say; considering the widespread use of Windows, the agreements that Apple has with Microsoft, the early versions distributed from Microsoft and the different ways to install fonts on Linux, that the best options, are the Core fonts for the Web from Microsoft. Specifically the Georgia and Verdana. ...


3

It is quite a dynamic, responsive design. They use is-visuallyhidden on many of elements which need to be shown/hidden at various times, and then use the css or javascript to toggle between the two states. For example, shrink your browser window down, and you will see certain page elements appear or disappear depending on the window size. This is common ...


3

No. Even though the layout is exactly the same across all pages, that accounts for a small percent of the entire source code of any page. If you have tons of unique content per page, then the layout code would make up an even smaller percentage of duplicate content. However, If your layout consists of a side panel with almost the same text for every page, ...


3

Create a new document file like file.txt (In most OS you can do that by clicking on right button) and edit the extension from file.txt to file.xml or sitemap.xml, whatever you want. Add your all URL's in simple line. No need to add XML sitemap tags like <loc> <url> etc. Just plain absolute URL name like google use on their sitemap Upload your ...


3

The common issue of this error is that is we forgot to attach the google analytics id again or there is mistake in google analytics tracking code. It has happened to me quite often carefully analyzing should fix the issue.


3

Using the same image in several places isn't necessarily bad. I think it can actually be good UX if you use it for a recurring type of post. That way, your users will easily recognize this type of post while scrolling down your blog. In terms of SEO I would consider if you can make the image more specific to each post and/or keyword (if that's possible with ...


2

Responsive Design Lets You Host Content All Under One Roof Responsive allows you to host the same content for multiple platforms all on one page rather than multiple pages this has awesome SEO value purely because your back link gains from desktop platforms will boost the mobile pages and vice versa without leaking due to unnecessary extra pages which could ...


2

For an average website that supports both rel="canonical" links for both m.domain.com and www.domain.com should only ever need to use 1 sitemap by using Annotation in Sitemaps. So even if your website is responsive or supports both using different URL you should only ever need to use one sitemap (for standard sites). Now since your question is about ...


2

Spriting can be used for JPEGs too. Just remember the rules: Use JPEG for photos, PNG for art (or WebP for both) Spriting is for decorative images, not content. e.g. don't sprite photos on a photo sharing website, or a web page discussing image optimisation! Do sprite background images and other decorative pictures. Carelessly spriting JPEGs together is ...


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