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You can edit the local dns file on your computer to direct any domain (including ones already in use) to any Ip address. I forget where the file is or what it's named though. Anyone who wanted to access your site would have to do this though. This works because when you type in a domain your computer will refer to that file first. Then if that file can't ...


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The home page for a website is served based on the configuration of the web server that hosts it. Typically, the default setting would be that on attempting to reach the root of any directory, the server would attempt to serve a file named index, either index.html, index.php, or index.asp (this is generally down to the preference of the person building the ...


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You can set your canonical to be the current page URL. According to Get the full URL in PHP on stackoverflow.com, you just need to initiate your $canonical variable like: $canonical = (isset($_SERVER['HTTPS']) && $_SERVER['HTTPS'] === 'on' ? "https" : "http") . "://" . $_SERVER['HTTP_HOST'] . $_SERVER['REQUEST_URI']; Maybe right where your $title ...


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Essentially, your biggest problem is that you have 78 broken links. You need to find and fix those--mostly because people will get stranded looking for your content. Switching to a different platform or reinstalling your site to the existing platform is likely to make this kind of issue worse before it gets better. Find a good analytical spider (I use this ...


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All of your errors look fixable to me. It is a lot of work to switch to a different website framework or content management system. Fixing broken links is relatively easy. None of those errors or warnings are going to prevent Google from indexing or ranking your content. Fixing the issues may improve SEO slightly, but none of the issues are going to ...


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